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McBrain
BRB Face Melting

join:2010-05-06
Kalimdor
kudos:2
reply to TruSm0ke

Re: Intel Haswell i5 and i7 line-ups leaked

Currently I'm going with:

AMD Phenom II x4 965 Black Edition @4.0GHz
ASRock Extreme 3 970
MSI R7870 HAWK TwinFrozrII
750w PSU
2x4GB DDR3 1600 Corsair Vengeance RAM

I want to switch from AMD to Intel. I plan on keeping the GPU and getting another to CrossFire. I'll also be going from 1 23" monitor to 3 in a trifinity setup (or going to a Korean 27" 2560x1440).

Budget is somewhere in the vicinity of $1000 for CPU, Mobo, monitor(s), and GPU. I'm still in the planning stage. I won't be making any moves until roughly March.

Right now it looks like I can get an I5-3570k, Mobo, and GPU from newegg for roughly $600. That leaves ~400 for the monitor and maybe a couple extra bucks for 8 more GB of RAM.
--
McBrain#1430

Name's Ash...Housewares.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
The AURIA 27" is $400 from Microcenter (I have one and love it). The advantage being that you can get it shipped to you AND you get a 30-day no-questions-asked return policy.

With the Shimians/Catleaps are you on your own should you get a faulty one off Ebay.
--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.


McBrain
BRB Face Melting

join:2010-05-06
Kalimdor
kudos:2
said by Krisnatharok:

The AURIA 27" is $400 from Microcenter (I have one and love it). The advantage being that you can get it shipped to you AND you get a 30-day no-questions-asked return policy.

From what I've seen, the other two from ebay are relative in price and yes, definitely are more risky. I've been leaning towards an AURIA from the start.

Conversely, there are a dozen different 23" monitors in the $109-$139 range on amazon.

I would more than likely end up only paying $40-$50 more for the trifinity set-up. Obviously going that route would have pros/cons in comparison to the AURIA...I think a lot of that choice will depend on mood at the time of purchase.

Edit: that's $40-$50 more for just the monitors...doesn't count the dongles and shit I'd have to buy.
--
McBrain#1430

Name's Ash...Housewares.


Moos
Tequilablob
Premium
join:2008-12-11
Salt Lake City, UT
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast
I started with the 3 monitor setup and ended up not liking it, so I bought a korean and absolutely love it. In addition to Auria if you dont feel comfortable buying overseas, checkout overlord. you can even get a 120hz 2560x1440 27 inch if they ever get em in stock.


TruSm0ke

join:2005-07-21
Michigan
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to TruSm0ke
Click for full size
Haswell Leaked Line-Up
To get back on-topic, I've found another leak on the new i5 & i7 line-ups. These are slated to be released Q2 2013.

quote:
"Tech rumor site VR-Zone claims to have an authentic list of Intel’s first wave of “Haswell” desktop processors, and while we can’t confirm it outright, the parts listed seem highly plausible. Of the 14 CPU’s detailed, 6 fall under the category “standard power” with TDP’s of 84W, and 8 are referred to as “low power”, with TDP’s ranging between 65W - 35W."

"Perhaps the most interesting tidbit of information here is the omission of Core i3. All of the chips on the list fall under the Core i5 and Core i7 family, and range from 3.0GHz to 3.9GHz when you factor in the Turbo Boost. Dual core parts also appear to be on the way out. Only one of the 14 CPU’s isn’t quad core, and Hyper Threading continues to be a Core i7 Exclusive."

"Integrated graphics potential is also getting a bump. All of the Haswell desktop parts here will have Intel HD 4600, and depending on how it fairs in the benchmarks, 4600 may finally lay the kiss of death on the sub $200 discrete graphics market." - Maximum PC

What is most interesting to me is the lack of K processor options. Perhaps they noticed people were getting such large overclocks with the K series that they were losing money on people not upgrading or it was cannibalizing their upper-tier processors. As it looks from that chart, they are doing away with K processors UNLESS you're willing to drop a pretty penny(i'm sure) on the i5 4670K or i7 4770K if you want overclocking.

And it also appears like the socket debate can be put to rest. It's going to be Socket 1150, supposedly.

Source: »www.maximumpc.com/article/news/r···_release


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
Sandy Bridge had only two initial “K” series processors at launch. The Core i7 2600K and the Core i5 2500K. This was later supplemented with the Core i5 2550K and Core i7 2700K. These were late entries though.

Ivy Bridge again had only two initial K series parts, Core i7 3770K and Core i5 3570K.

Therefore I see nothing different about Haswell being launched with two K series parts such as the 4770K and 4670K. In fact it’s a fairly predictable pattern. Hopefully pricing will be similar too although anyone with Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge parts would seem to have little reason to upgrade.

The BGA only processor rumor was presumably for processors after Haswell so in this respect nothing is proved or disproved. Although Intel has already made a statement that they will keep sockets for the foreseeable future,.....or something like that.

***Edit***

I see you meant the LGA socket pin count. As far as I can recall LGA1150 was never in dispute.


TruSm0ke

join:2005-07-21
Michigan
Reviews:
·Comcast
@Octavean - You're right.

As for the socket, because these have only been leaks and not official word from Intel. Many people have discussed what they think the next official socket will be for these processors. Because both Ivy & Sandy Bridge are sockets LGA 1155 and the Extreme Edition 3960X is LGA 2011... there is room for discussion on what Intel's next socket will be. Especially since nobody knows for sure at this point.


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
My understanding is as follows:

LGA1155 had its final processor upgrade with Ivy Bridge. LGA2011 will presumably receive an Ivy Bridge-E upgrade in mid 2013 but will receive no new chipset and no Intel Thunderbolt support (since an Intel video subsystem is a requirement of the spec). Haswell will use LGA1150 but there may be a different socket for servers based on Haswell.

I don’t consider anything final until we hear it from Intel or see the new hardware.


McBrain
BRB Face Melting

join:2010-05-06
Kalimdor
kudos:2
reply to Moos
I've looked at the overlord site, and I'm not too stoked about 1) the price...nearly $600 for the 120Hz monitor, and 2) if I wanted one I'd have to get on the waiting list by paying for the monitor now...that just seems shady to me.

I'll either go with an AURIA, or put my name on the waiting list for a Catleap for free at 120hz.net


TruSm0ke

join:2005-07-21
Michigan
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by McBrain:

... or put my name on the waiting list for a Catleap for free at 120hz.net

Thanks for the link, I've been curious about these displays.

EDIT: The site owner/forum moderator drives a sweet, brand new BMW(shown in forum). Someone's making some very good money selling these displays to Americans!


McBrain
BRB Face Melting

join:2010-05-06
Kalimdor
kudos:2
Read around the forums on there a bit.

Those things are claimed INSTANTLY when he puts out a shipment date.


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to TruSm0ke
Intel Core i7 "Haswell" M-Series Notebook CPU Lineup Detailed

quote:
Intel's Core i7 "Haswell" line of high-performance mobile processors will launch around roughly the same time as its first desktop counterparts, in April 2013. The April launch will consist of three models, which occupy conventional TDP ratings, making them fit for performance/gaming classes of notebooks, they're not quite Ultrabook-material.


»www.techpowerup.com/177548/Intel···led.html


C0deZer0
Oc'D To Rhythm And Police
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Tempe, AZ
reply to TruSm0ke
What about an Ivy Bridge-E? And even if it's a 2011, I bet that intel will intentionally alter things to require yet another new motherboard purchase, too.

I don't know about the rest of you, but the only reason intel video would even exist in my system is because of how apparently superior that Quicksync is.

If anything, one thing I wish intel would do for this next line of CPU's is to allow more PCI-E lanes in general. As it is now, even if my system were kaput and I needed to rebuild in a hurry, there isn't a single motherboard I like enough to bother with, and far too many compromises all due to the fact that intel won't allow more PCI-E lanes except for those that buy Xeons.
--
Because, f*ck Sony


pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
Premium
join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1
said by C0deZer0:

If anything, one thing I wish intel would do for this next line of CPU's is to allow more PCI-E lanes in general. As it is now, even if my system were kaput and I needed to rebuild in a hurry, there isn't a single motherboard I like enough to bother with, and far too many compromises all due to the fact that intel won't allow more PCI-E lanes except for those that buy Xeons.

Is there something I'm missing, because AFAIK if you pony up for an LGA 2011 setup (not necessarily Xeon, an i7 38xx or 39xx) then there are 40 lanes of PCIe straight straight to the CPU if you buy a motherboard that can use them.

Also I think it's confirmed that Ivy Bridge-E will work on the current X79 chipsets.


C0deZer0
Oc'D To Rhythm And Police
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Tempe, AZ
The cynic in me believes intel will find a way to mess with Ivy Bridge-E (if they ever put it out) so that it won't be compatible with existing X79 boards, and thus require yet another motherboard replacement.

On one end, even though there's little reason to, no current X79 board is certified for PCI-E 3.0 operation... which is about the only reason now to go for a z77 over an x79.

On the z77 front, it's not that there isn't a variety of boards, but many have significant compromises. Heck, even to just get one thunderbolt port at times seems like you're giving up half the available options anywhere else. And according to Tom's, just two thunderbolt ports could theoretically flood the existing z77 chipset, and not even leave enough bandwidth to handle commands from the keyboard and mouse.

And this is before even taking into account that (IIRC) z77 still doesn't have chipset-native USB 3.0 (as opposed to requiring additional controllers and drivers), and only (at most) two SATA 6gbps ports natively. Having been bitten once before already on third-party controllers that required additional drivers in the past, I'm twice shy regarding any boards that have integrated controllers that require a separate installation.
--
Because, f*ck Sony


pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
Premium
join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1

1 edit
Does anyone even do CPU upgrades anymore? Upgrading from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge is burning money IMO, and if you're burning money on that you probably want the features in the newer chipsets anyways.

I was initially a bit miffed about my i7 860 on lga 1156 basically being the end of the line for that socket. But in the end would I really pay hundreds of dollars for a slightly faster CPU on the same chipset? I don't think so, it's been 3 years now and if I did want to upgrade I would want to move to a new platform with native USB 3.0 and PCIe 3.0 and so on.

Thunderbolt...giant meh from me in a desktop environment. But of course z77 has bandwidth issues in certain cases, with Intel's strategy the last few years of having mainstream and performance platforms it is the performance platform you want if you are concerned about things like chipset bandwidth.

The rub is that, at least these days, the performance platform cycle is behind the mainstream one. So if you want tons of PCIe 3.0 lanes and such, waiting for Ivy Bridge-E and the chipsets that drop with it is the only way to go.


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to C0deZer0
Well like I said before, I’ve heard that there wont be a new chipset for Ivy Bridge-E and that LGA2011 will remain C606 / X79. I’ve also heard that there will be no additional cores so the enthusiast level LGA2011 Ivy Bridge-E processors will presumably remain no more then 6 cores 12 threads (no 8 cores 16 threads). And as stated before no Intel Thunderbolt support even though it’s the higher-end platform and best suited for it.

However, if a new chipset were added take note of the naming scheme of Sandy Bridge-E to Ivy Bridge-E closely mirrors that of Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge which had rare yet noteworthy interchangeable compatibility. Recall that the X79 chipset had its features truncated at launch and lost features like 14 SATA ports (SAS) and an enhanced version of Intel SRT SSD caching so the chips seems overdue for an upgrade compared to lower-end / lower positioned cheaper solutions like the Z77 (and upcoming Haswell Z87,..!?!).

Some Haswell chipsets / motherboards will presumably have 6 native Intel SATA 6G ports and motherboard manufacturers will likely add more. Z77 already has native USB 3.0.

I don’t intend to upgrade my Core i7 3930K / Asus P9X9 Deluxe / 32GB / HD 6870 system to Ivy Bridge-E even if everything I have heard about it is wrong because I am reasonably happy with the platform as it is,… I might upgrade the video card to a GTX 660 Ti though,….


C0deZer0
Oc'D To Rhythm And Police
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Tempe, AZ
reply to pnjunction
Funny thing is, it didn't use to matter that much, until I started noticing why it seemed that some boards have like half their ports chopped off in the name of having ONE (or maybe two) thunderbolt ports, is kinda nuts. That and apparently a big reason for this from the Tom's Hardware article was because intel was insistent on trying to keep its integrated video available.

I know that in my case, if I have the ports available, I want to use 'em. It's why my dream rig(s) usually involve waterblocking the vid cards - so I can make use of all the expansion slots on the board. It is with dismay that even the water-cooled edition of a GTX 680 is still two slots. Though that's more because of how many displays it can support. Highest end I've seen that is a pure one-slot with liquid is still the GTX 580. And I'd been bitten too much with ATI to look at their stuff again.
--
Because, f*ck Sony


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
quote:
Top Intel Ivy Bridge-E Core Processors To Still Pack Six Cores

Intel's 2011-launched Core i7 "Sandy Bridge-E" HEDT platform is based on a 32 nm silicon that's common with Xeon E5 series processors. While the silicon physically packs eight CPU cores and 20 MB last-level cache (LLC, or L3 cache), client Core i7 processors are configured with only a maximum of six cores, and up to 15 MB L3 cache. According to a MyDrivers.com report, the maximum core count won't change with next-generation 22 nm Ivy Bridge-E Core i7 processors.

Ivy Bridge-E will be an upscale of Ivy Bridge. Similar to Sandy Bridge-E, the silicon will feature up to eight cores and 20 MB L3 cache. In its Core i7 avatar, however, the chip will be configured with no more than six cores, and no more than 15 MB L3 cache. The new chip will introduce IPC improvements, PCI-Express Gen 3.0 certified root complex (one which NVIDIA will approve of), higher CPU core clock speeds, and support for faster memory.
TDP could be the only reason Intel isn't willing to unlock cores 7 and 8 on client processors. Eight core, 20 MB LLC-laden Xeon E5 models based on today's 32 nm silicon, with 130W TDP, barely manage to scrape the 3.00 GHz mark. Given that, the prospects for Ivy Bridge-E client CPUs to run with all cores and LLC enabled, and yet deliver higher clock speeds than predecessors were always going to be low.

Intel Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT processors are compatible with existing socket LGA2011 motherboards (subject to BIOS update), and are slated for Q3-2013.


»www.techpowerup.com/174811/Top-I···res.html


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to TruSm0ke
Intel Haswell and Broadwell Silicon Variants Detailed

»www.techpowerup.com/forums/showt···t=177817

There is indeed a Broadwell LGA 1150 option on the roadmap.