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ba1drick

join:2004-07-01
Baraboo, WI
reply to ba1drick

Re: One visible SSID broadcasted by 2 routers?

I think I should try to manually power down each camera (while both APs are running) and see if they will connect to the stronger/closer one...


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

said by ba1drick:

I think I should try to manually power down each camera (while both APs are running) and see if they will connect to the stronger/closer one...

i would do the opposite. i would unplug 1 AP and see if they auto connect to the other one while monitoring the program to see if there is any down time/flickering while it reconnects to the wifi.


ba1drick

join:2004-07-01
Baraboo, WI

I already did that. If I manually power down or reboot AP#1, all cameras connect to AP#2 and vice versa. Tried both ways. They keep that connection afterward.

Also, on need of 2 APs serving same SSID - I added a note about wireless speaker system to one of my previous posts. What used to happen with 1 AP, it would screw up entire wifi. Not sure what happens, but SSID was just wiped off the list of available networks. Now, with 2 APs, I haven't had that problem for past 2 weeks... I am not saying it fixed it 100%, it it might as well had.

Ie. now, with 2 APs doing same SSID, one set up at channel 1 and other one at channel 11, if that wireless system jumps, I am hoping it just goes up or down (vs completely taking over entire spectrum), so 1 of the APs would still survive.


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

personally, i think you are creating a bigger issue by trying to have a more redundant setup (w/o the proper hardware).



ba1drick

join:2004-07-01
Baraboo, WI

Not sure why you are implying that my hardware isn't proper for such a simple setup.

I tried scanning the available wifi networks from my smartphone and SSID shows just once. I am guessing it will also be the case with Windows, but I won't know until one of my friends shows up with laptop loaded with Windows, as I haven't used it for close to 8 years now (and I am not missing it


tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1

the setup is simple, i agree, but i dont know if what you are trying to do with consumer equipment is a feature of said equipment.



clarknova

join:2010-02-23
Grande Prairie, AB
kudos:7
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to ba1drick

The wireless client (the cameras in this case) makes its own decisions on how it handles roaming. In some cases, the client will prefer the SSID with the stronger or cleaner signal. In other cases, it may consider other factors, but in most cases it will deprecate the use of an AP whose signal strength and quality is below a certain threshold.

If you want your cameras to prefer a certain AP, but still fail over to the other in case of an outage, you could try reducing the output power on the secondary AP. You may find a point at which the cameras will not prefer it, but are still able to connect to it if the preferred AP goes down.

If you find your speakers are usually causing interference on a specific channel, you may want to put the secondary AP closer to that end of the spectrum and leave the preferred AP at the cleaner end.
--
db



ba1drick

join:2004-07-01
Baraboo, WI

Speakers situation is still a mystery for me. It's a discontinued model with limited literature and no current support. Awesome sound and everything, but pretty impossible to guess what channels it's using. It has selectable 1-2-3-4 channels and they are not visible by any network discovery tool. My guess is 1-2-3-4 has nothing to do with IEEE 802.11.

That's why I thought that 2 APs with distant (1 and 11) channels would possibly cure the problem when wireless speakers go out of control. BTW, using my linux laptop, I can see both SSIDs (same ones) throughout the house and at all camera locations, obviously with various signal strengths.

As far as camera connections, I will try to look for connection pattern.



billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5
reply to ba1drick

said by ba1drick:

I think I should try to manually power down each camera (while both APs are running) and see if they will connect to the stronger/closer one...

This is what I would suggest. This will give the camera the opportunity to connect to the AP with the strongest signal. Once connected to an AP, it will maintain that connection until something prevents it from doing so. Ideally, the load will be balanced with each AP having half of the wireless devices connected to it. Just remember that you will need to repeat the process whenever an AP is rebooted, or if a camera is forced to another AP due to temporary interference from the wireless speakers.


billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5
reply to ba1drick

said by ba1drick:

Speakers situation is still a mystery for me. It's a discontinued model with limited literature and no current support. Awesome sound and everything, but pretty impossible to guess what channels it's using. It has selectable 1-2-3-4 channels and they are not visible by any network discovery tool. My guess is 1-2-3-4 has nothing to do with IEEE 802.11.

That's why I thought that 2 APs with distant (1 and 11) channels would possibly cure the problem when wireless speakers go out of control. BTW, using my linux laptop, I can see both SSIDs (same ones) throughout the house and at all camera locations, obviously with various signal strengths.

As far as camera connections, I will try to look for connection pattern.

Borrow a Windows Laptop and load up inSSIDer (or a comparable tool on your Linux Laptop). While watching the signal strength of your AP's, fire up the wireless speakers and cycle through each channel option. With your AP's set at channels 1 and 11, I'm guessing that option 2 or 3 on the speakers will cause the least interference.