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elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to yyzlhr

Re: Cisco DPC3010 Cable Modem

said by yyzlhr:

Most customers who are not on these forums would be pissed if they were told by tech support to contact their modem retailer/manufacturer if they were experiencing issues.

IMHO standalone modem issues are pure myth. 99.999% of name brand modems run rock solid forever on original factory issued firmware. For Rogers to blame "customer service requirements" as the reason behind their restrictive hardware usage policies is ridiculous.

This "modem swapping racket" Rogers engages in is nothing more than a smoke screen to protect incompetent CSRs, Rogers network failures, and as usual, making a fool out of their customers.

Oh, and did I forget to mention Rogers world famous firmware updates that manage to decimate every decent piece of hardware they come in contact with..........


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by elitefx:

said by yyzlhr:

Most customers who are not on these forums would be pissed if they were told by tech support to contact their modem retailer/manufacturer if they were experiencing issues.

IMHO standalone modem issues are pure myth. 99.999% of name brand modems run rock solid forever on original factory issued firmware. For Rogers to blame "customer service requirements" as the reason behind their restrictive hardware usage policies is ridiculous.

This "modem swapping racket" Rogers engages in is nothing more than a smoke screen to protect incompetent CSRs, Rogers network failures, and as usual, making a fool out of their customers.

Having worked in customer support for many MSOs including ones that allow 3rd party modems, standalone modem issues are certainly not a myth.

I do agree that Rogers should officially support, but NOT advertise their support of 3rd party modems. Only those who specifically ask about it should be told about the capability of using a 3rd party modem. This would produce a healthy balance of catering to both the tech savvy and non-tech savvy customer base.

Hooter

join:2009-08-17
Scarborough, ON

1 recommendation

What Rogers really needs to do is to support and authorize at least one good, decent stand alone D3 modem on their system. It has been explained to me that the reason Rogers is using only gateway modems is to make things "easier" for their customers. The theory seems to be that you simply hook up your gateway modem and you are done - kind of a no mess, no fuss type of logic. The customer who is not terribly literate when it comes to technology does not have to go through the so-called hassle of setting up their own router, since with the Rogers gateway, it is all done for you - one nice, neat package.

Now, if the gateways worked as advertised, all would be well. This is what it states on the Rogers Website regarding the Hitron.
-Our furthest reaching Wi-Fi modem, delivers maximum signal strength anywhere in the home with virtually NO dead zones!
-This is our best performing and most consistent Wi-Fi modem yet.
The problem though is that not only does the Hitron not work as advertised, none of the D3 modems are providing adequate wireless coverage within the home. So the irony, in the end, is that the customer who is using one of these gateways and is experiencing dropped connections and poor range, may have no clue what to do.

So, when they cannot get decent WIFI, they call Rogers. First, they are told to reboot the modem. Then they are told to try a direct connection if using wireless. (But Mr. Rogers, it is the wireless connection that I am concerned about.) Then they might be told to take the modem in and exchange it. At no time does a Rogers agent actually explain to the customer that the wireless component of the gateway is not very good and that the customer might need to have the modem placed in bridge mode and then have their own router hooked up. This would be admitting that their equipment is inferior and no way does Rogers want to do that. So in the end, what was supposed to make things easier for the customer has actually made things more difficult. By going on-line or talking to others, they may discover how to bridge the modem and use their own router. And of course they realize that they are now paying an extra $3 or $4 more per month for a modem that does not work properly.

Rogers continues to offer higher speeds and usage allowances for customers who switch to a D3 modem, but so far have not addressed the issue of the D3 modems which are far less than desirable when it comes to their performance as an "Enhanced Wi-Fi Modem".