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Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12

2 edits

Digital Clock Without Electricity or Moving Parts

Keep this one in mind for the person that has everything...A solar digital clock!

Theres even a smaller version for your window



usa2k
Blessed
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join:2003-01-26
Redford, MI
kudos:3

Re: Digital Clock Without Electricity or Moving Parts

In these days of cell phones, even a watch seems mostly irrelevant now.

Expand your moderator at work


Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·AT&T Midwest
reply to Dude111

Re: Digital Clock Without Electricity or Moving Parts

Then they'll need a solar powered watch with atomic timekeeping.

»www.gshock.com/watches/Classic/MTG900DA-8V

I have one like this and really like it.



Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12
reply to Dude111

 

Atomic time keeping? (Does that mean it auto syncs with a time server?)



Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·AT&T Midwest

said by Dude111:

Atomic time keeping? (Does that mean it auto syncs with a time server?)

Yes, it syncs with the shortwave radio time calibration signal from the atomic clock in Fort Collins, CO. every night, when the signal propagates best.

I have an atomic wall clock too.

»www.lacrossetechnology.com/8117o···ndex.php

James_C

join:2007-08-03
Florence, KY
reply to usa2k

Re: Digital Clock Without Electricity or Moving Parts

I feel the same about credit card multitools. Never again will I need a real screwdriver, saw, wrench, or can opener.


Thane_Bitter
Inquire within
Premium
join:2005-01-20
reply to Dude111

Re: Digital Clock Without Electricity or Moving Parts

Given it's costs a sundial does the same and for much less, hell you can build one out of a sheet of cardboard and a bit of tape. If you want something more elaborate there are sundials that give mean time rather than solar time.



Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·AT&T Midwest

said by Thane_Bitter:

Given it's costs a sundial does the same and for much less, hell you can build one out of a sheet of cardboard and a bit of tape. If you want something more elaborate there are sundials that give mean time rather than solar time.

The Deluxe model...




EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Callcentric

Click for full size
Here's my pocket sun dial with compass that my lovely bride gave me for Christmas
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.


Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US

Very nice.

Expand your moderator at work

broccoli

join:2007-11-29
Portland, OR
reply to Trihexagonal

Re:  

said by Trihexagonal:

Yes, it syncs with the shortwave radio time calibration signal from the atomic clock in Fort Collins, CO. every night, when the signal propagates best.

I am nitpicking, but WWVB carries the atomic time signal these timepieces sync to, on 60 kHz, which is longwave. You might be thinking of its sister stations WWV and WWVH, which indeed do broadcast on shortwave frequencies.


Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·AT&T Midwest

said by broccoli:

said by Trihexagonal:

Yes, it syncs with the shortwave radio time calibration signal from the atomic clock in Fort Collins, CO. every night, when the signal propagates best.

I am nitpicking, but WWVB carries the atomic time signal these timepieces sync to, on 60 kHz, which is longwave. You might be thinking of its sister stations WWV and WWVH, which indeed do broadcast on shortwave frequencies.

Nitpick away.

I referred to it as a shortwave radio signal, not to the frequency it was transmitted on. The Radio Shack DX-398 shortwave radio has what is considered to be a SW reception range of 50 kHz - 29.999 MHz.

quote:
Frequency Range:

LW, AM, FM, FM Stereo
SW (continuous 50 kHz - 29.999 MHz, AM & SSB/CW modes)
»support.radioshack.com/support_e···6356.htm

So to make it simple, I referred to it as the shortwave radio time calibration signal so as not to be confused with standard AM radios with a lower range of 530 KHz or FM radio signal.

Before you nitpick me on that :

quote:
At 60 kHz, there isn’t enough room on the signal (bandwidth) to carry a voice or any type of audio information. Instead, all that is sent is a code, which consists of a series of binary digits, or bits, which have only two possible values (0 or 1). These bits are generated at WWVB by raising and lowering the power of the signal. They are sent at a very slow rate of 1 bit per second, and it takes a full minute to send a complete time code, or a message that tells the clock the current date and time. When you turn a radio controlled clock on, it will probably miss the first time code, so it usually takes more than one minute to set itself (sometimes 5 minutes or longer) depending on the signal quality and the receiver design.
»www.nist.gov/pml/div688/grp40/ra···ocks.cfm

I have a Radio Shack DX-394 and a Grundig Mini 300 World Band Receiver.

I'd like to part with the DX-394, it's never been modded. I live in an apartment building and can't string a wire and it's been years since I've listened to it. I won a contest on the Taipei Taiwan shortwave radio station several years ago using the 394 to listen to it though.


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12
reply to Dude111

I have a DX-440 and i think thats pretty much the BEST reciever they ever made

Only thing i dont like is ITS OFF FREQUENCY BY 1 (If a station is centered on 1.090Mhz it will show up @ 1.091 on this)