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chucky5150
Divers do it Deeper

join:2001-11-03
New Iberia, LA

Nailing crown molding question

I'm getting ready to start installing crown molding through out the house. Just finished a small testing / learning hallway (small, poor lighting, and just 4 inside corners). I cheated and used some 1 1/4" brad nails as there was some cheap molding I used as a nailing strip already up. Now it's time to get the right tool for the job.

The molding we are installing is 2 3/4"

I've read a few different ways on how to nail up the molding. Some say to nail the top and bottom of the crown in to the joists while others say to nail in the center of the molding into the top plate.

Second question I have is do I use 2" or 2 1/2" nail? Anything I should know about finish nail guns before I get me one?

Thank you.
--
Member of the US Air Force since May 7th, 2002 To March 29th, 2005

"You sneak up behind yourself and remove your pants before you realize what's going on." KOL


Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1
You are going to get so many responses here. Some say what you mentions others will say put a furring strip down so you don't have to guess where to nail. I'd say go what you feel is giving you the best results on your wall.


Trimmer

@mycingular.net
reply to chucky5150
Usually nail top and bottom. 2" nails are usually plenty long. I cope all inside corners and use cordless Paslode framing, finish and brad nail guns.

harald

join:2010-10-22
Columbus, OH
kudos:2
reply to chucky5150
Cope, don't miter the corners.


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to chucky5150
If you're using stainable grade wood crown get yourself some filler sticks/crayons (not the burn-in type) to match the stain or natural wood color. That way you can fill each hole as you go. Keep a damp rag with you in case you happen to use too much filler on the crown leaving a dull smear and keep your hands clean.

Remember your miter cuts are upside down and backwards, then cope.

Remember your miter cut is half of the wall angle, e.g. walls on a 90° angle = 2- 45° cuts, walls on a 45° angle = 2- 22 1/2° cuts etc.

Nailing into ceiling joists or wall studs is whatever is easier for you. Do you own a stud finder? Nailing every other stud is fine unless your using composite/engineered molding that tends to sag.

Leave ends hanging until you're ready make your corner for any minor adjustment due to walls being out of square, plumb or both. I use a 5 in 1 tool to slide behind the trim when making adjustments.

If painting the crown, be sure to caulk nail holes, joints and edges where necessary.

EDIT: If you're not a contractor, don't buy a Paslode. The gas canisters are dated and if the batteries sit too long without use they will go bad on you. Replacement batteries are in the $75.00 range. Get yourself one of those little pancake air-compressors. They usually come with brad/trim nailer.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing


chucky5150
Divers do it Deeper

join:2001-11-03
New Iberia, LA

1 recommendation

Thank you dolphins See Profile, I do in fact have a stud finder. We went with the paint grade wood. I just didn't know enough about the composite to go with that.

I ended up going with a Stanley Bostitch nail gun. I've used framing Paslodes while I was in the air force. It was nice, but I have an air compressor with enough hose to reach the whole house.
--
Member of the US Air Force since May 7th, 2002 To March 29th, 2005

"You sneak up behind yourself and remove your pants before you realize what's going on." KOL

scott_urman

join:2002-07-18
San Mateo, CA
reply to chucky5150
I've used a furring strip the whole length of the wall, that way I could just nail directly through the center of the molding without worrying about hitting a stud.


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to chucky5150
Sounds like your ready to get to it. I assume you already have a compound miter saw?

I started out with my father using a miter box, a backsaw and a coping saw. There were no such thing as nail guns at that time either. I'll keep an eye out for updates to this thread in case you have further questions.

Have at it.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to chucky5150
said by chucky5150:

I just didn't know enough about the composite to go with that.

If painting, there is little difference between the two for whats required to install it. If staining, you gotta go with the solid wood.

Never, ever use the wrapped styrofoam crap. Whoever invented that stuff should be shot.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to chucky5150
The result you'll get with a miter saw cannot even compare with a coping saw. Get your hands on a miter/bevel vs corner angle table first. Example this one: »www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/C···gle.html No two corners are equal, measure them and adjust the saw accordingly. A 1 degree difference is HUGE.
Nail into studs and joists when possible, when the joists are parallel use a furring strip for the top. Yes it's more work but the walls are never straight and you'll have ugly gaps if you don't. A pro told me to use construction adhesive on the back of the molding, greatly reduces shrinking and expansion when humidity changes. And when you join 2 pieces make a 45deg cut to overlap
You're not doing this by the clock rushing to go to the next job so take your time. Test the exact angles of the saw with scrap pieces first. If you do it right it will appear that it's a single piece...


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to chucky5150
Make a cheater strip. Rip some thin plywood with angle for the back of the molding to nail to. Like a few others, find studs then nail or screw this to them. Then you can nail the molding anywhere on the strip.

Tip: prime and paint BOTH sides of molding/crown. Keeps expansion low at joints (swelling from moisture)...unless these are non-wood kind.
--
Splat