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This is a sub-selection from That's AWESOME!!!

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to en103

Re: That's AWESOME!!!

The landline PHONE is nearly dead. HOWEVER, the need for that infrastructure to bring us The Internet (which is how a lot of people get their home phone) is far from dead. Wireless is an absolutely horrible way to get internet access... it's a relatively small pipe with an almost uncontrollable number of users -- the tech is inherently mobile.


openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

said by cramer:

the tech is inherently mobile.

Mobility is obviously the best use of wireless technology. As the world continues trending toward increasing mobility, I doubt wireless services are going to trail off anytime soon. Yes, wired infrastructure is still critical for communications infrastructure...especially to backhaul the wireless portions.


djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO

1 recommendation

reply to cramer

said by cramer:

Wireless is an absolutely horrible way to get internet access... it's a relatively small pipe with an almost uncontrollable number of users -- the tech is inherently mobile.

Totally agree, although it might make more sense in sparse rural areas. In that scenario there just aren't as many endpoints competing for bandwidth.

If LTE Advanced gets up to 1gbps, it could serve a lot of customers. Compare that to my cable company who's offering 50mbps service on 4 38mbps 256QAM channels per neighborhood node.

In more densely populated areas wireline will still be necessary - they'll need all this capacity just for mobile devices.

--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.


Monos

@sbc.com
reply to cramer

Landline is in no way dead, it is in decline but there are still hundreds of millions of Landlines out there in use every day. I will never disconnect mine willingly, when the power goes out Voip does not work for more than 20 minutes, if you are lucky.


patronanejo

join:2009-09-10
EC2R 8AH

2 edits

said by Monos :

...when the power goes out Voip does not work for more than 20 minutes, if you are lucky.

What are you talking about--VoIP on a desktop powered by UPS? I don't think lucky applies to any part of that.

You realise that cell phones carry their own UPS--and operate on expressly designed voice-over-GSM/CDMA networks--right?

Not to mention the ease with which you can access VoIP services over LTE- or 3G networks....

Most cell towers--but not all--have backup battery power. Last year, the FCC looked into requiring carriers to harden emergency power at all cell sites--but was sued by the CTIA and lost.

Hurricane Sandy made the FCC's point pretty firmly.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9

1 recommendation

It made the telco's point as well... the facilities necessary to keep a cell tower (much less *all* of them) operational until the grid is restored would be *cough* extreme. (sizing the generator to the site, the cost of MANY generators, quite sizable amount of on-site fuel, security to keep people from stealing it, and contracts to manage filling/cycling the fuel.)

Keeping CO's powered is trivial by comparison. There aren't as many of them. And many (almost all?) are manned sites -- techs work from there or are in there regularly.


whozzit

join:2003-03-26
Westwood, CA
Reviews:
·DigitalPath

1 recommendation

reply to cramer

All of that seems to be relative. I've been subscribed to a fixed wireless ISP here in northeastern California since it was offered in 2002 (Digitalpath). I've found it to be robust for more than ten years now (5 MB down and 1 MB up), the house is online 24/7 and there are no useage caps of any kind. This all came about because the telco had the DSL situation locked up (in their favor). Digitalpath overcame this by not using and phone lines or cable to get to their suscribers... they used the air instead. It has always been robust enough to use VoIP (telephone) over 24/7; both incomeing and outgoing.