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morisato

join:2008-03-16
Oshawa, ON
Reviews:
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A question about Linux ISOs, No Really LINUX ISO's For real!

So i have some real Questions rofl about actual LINUX isos Not the " Linux" isos P:) i am looking to runmyself a simple Server box for Universal Media Server, SABNZBD, Sickbeard headphones and lazy Librarian etc.. Just curious recomendations for a good Linux Build thats easily remote controllable from another pc and friendly to a techie But new to Linux person.
--
Every time Someone leaves Sympatico an Angel gets its wings.

tedrampart

join:2011-12-13
London, ON
I use ubuntu 12.04 (been a ubuntu user since the early days, before that slackware) for home use.. I also exclusively run debian for all my servers I maintain..

I'd normally recommend ubuntu, but the latest release has some privacy concerns over the online/local search results in the 12.10 release.. if you try it, use the 12.04 release.. it's very easy to navigate.. and apt has a lot of good stuff..

also for newsgroups, sabnzbd is great for a backend, and i like lottanzb as the download manager.. seems to work well.. just make sure you install the former if you're going to use the latter as it relies on it.. but yet the dependencies don't flag it as required for some reason.

morisato

join:2008-03-16
Oshawa, ON
Reviews:
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ya I have never Used Any Linux, but i can rip windows apart with my eyes shut I use all the apps That Linux users do rofl, Just windows versions So i really Should try and switch. maybe i will dual boot on my main machine to get used to it. I think most of my steam games will run on it. who knows.
--
Every time Someone leaves Sympatico an Angel gets its wings.

tedrampart

join:2011-12-13
London, ON
well steam for linux is about to be released, but sadly needs ubuntu 12.10 from what I've read of it.

I used to used steam in Linux using WINE (wine is not an emulator, recursive acronyms .. get used to those haha) for a long time, played the half-life series that way actually.. worked well but not a forsure.. good luck, it's quite liberating being free from closed corporate software and be at peace with it!

n2burns

join:2012-11-27
Chatham, ON
"Officially" Steam for Linux only supports Ubuntu but works with most other distros. My distro of choice is Crunchbang, which is an Openbox based Debian distro and I'm running the beta of Steam just fine.

n2burns

join:2012-11-27
Chatham, ON
reply to morisato
I suggest running VMs to test out distros. Try a few different distros to see what you like. I would recommend trying Ubuntu (though I hate the new DE, Unity), Crunchbang, Mint but give a go to any other versions that perk your interest a go.


ekster
Hi there
Premium
join:2010-07-16
Lachine, QC
kudos:3
Reviews:
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1 recommendation

reply to morisato
From my experience, Ubuntu or OpenSuse are the easier builds to use for someone who never touched linux before.

There's also Mint, that's the most popular one right now according to Distrowatch, which is based on Ubuntu, but is more or less ready to use out-of-the-box and supposed to be a lot easier to use, but I never tried it.


Angelo
The Network Guy
Premium
join:2002-06-18
reply to morisato
i'd recommend freebsd, however fedora is user friendly

freebsd would be mid ground and a lot faster…

shepd

join:2004-01-17
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
reply to morisato
Linux mint is the new hotness for people looking for easy and simple.

For those looking for difficult but totally customized, gentoo.

For those who enjoy doing everything the Unix way and don't care that it makes their life hard, Slackware 14 is out.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to morisato
If you want to keep a familiar user experience kind of like windows, but still want to stick to Ubuntu (because it's the most popular and has the best support from third party companies like Valve), you can try Kubuntu (KDE), Xubuntu (Xfce), or Lubuntu (LXDE). That is actually in order of how "lightweight" they are. KDE is a full-featured but heavyweight desktop environment, Xfce is traditionally a lightweight environment that is cleaner and less complicated than KDE, while LXDE is newer and has slightly lower memory usage than Xfce.

They're pretty close though. In mid 2011, Phoronix tested RAM usage, and came up with these averages in their test:

KDE 4.4: 522 MB
GNOME 2: 400 MB
Xfce 4.6: 342 MB
LXDE 0.5: 311 MB

If I had to pick a desktop Linux distro to install today, it would either be Xubuntu 12.10 or Mint 14.1.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org

comminus

join:2012-12-18
Langley, BC
reply to morisato
Most people coming from Windows are going to find the learning curve with Ubuntu to be quite friendly. There is a large support community to help you along the way and a ton of software packages available.

There are many of different flavours of Linux, I'd recommend you try a few before deciding for yourself. The suggestion of using VMs to test-drive different distributions will make this much easier.


Tx
bronx cheers from cheap seats
Premium
join:2008-11-19
Mississauga, ON
kudos:12
Reviews:
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reply to Guspaz
said by Guspaz:

If you want to keep a familiar user experience kind of like windows, but still want to stick to Ubuntu (because it's the most popular and has the best support from third party companies like Valve), you can try Kubuntu (KDE), Xubuntu (Xfce), or Lubuntu (LXDE). That is actually in order of how "lightweight" they are. KDE is a full-featured but heavyweight desktop environment, Xfce is traditionally a lightweight environment that is cleaner and less complicated than KDE, while LXDE is newer and has slightly lower memory usage than Xfce.

They're pretty close though. In mid 2011, Phoronix tested RAM usage, and came up with these averages in their test:

KDE 4.4: 522 MB
GNOME 2: 400 MB
Xfce 4.6: 342 MB
LXDE 0.5: 311 MB

If I had to pick a desktop Linux distro to install today, it would either be Xubuntu 12.10 or Mint 14.1.

I've been pretty impressed by Mint. Good choice here, then again all of which Gus suggested is good

morisato

join:2008-03-16
Oshawa, ON
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1 edit
Thanks for the suggestion I think i will Setup like 7 vms p:) one for each distro and go to town, Then once i find one i like parition up my ssd and install, Unfortunetly finding out blizzard hates linux users in d3 means i have to keep a w7 just for d3

ROFL This is funny i just downloaded 10 gig of actual Linux isos... I bet Out of all the folks who claim they downloaded a ton of linux isos i am one of the few to actually be telling the truth
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Every time Someone leaves Sympatico an Angel gets its wings.


Tx
bronx cheers from cheap seats
Premium
join:2008-11-19
Mississauga, ON
kudos:12
Reviews:
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said by morisato:

Thanks for the suggestion I think i will Setup like 7 vms p:) one for each distro and go to town, Then once i find one i like parition up my ssd and install, Unfortunetly finding out blizzard hates linux users in d3 means i have to keep a w7 just for d3

ROFL This is funny i just downloaded 10 gig of actual Linux isos... I bet Out of all the folks who claim they downloaded a ton of linux isos i am one of the few to actually be telling the truth

Lol though you're probably right, i download a lot of them myself for my openVZ and Xen servers and then of course my main nodes development and live environments

morisato

join:2008-03-16
Oshawa, ON
So far not so good ubuntu installer crashed during install on VM #1 oh well bed time i have 10 distros to setup tommorow.
--
Every time Someone leaves Sympatico an Angel gets its wings.


ekster
Hi there
Premium
join:2010-07-16
Lachine, QC
kudos:3
I believe you can also use most of them live. Don't even need to install it to use it... just put it on a disc or USB and it's good to go.

n2burns

join:2012-11-27
Chatham, ON
reply to morisato
You can also save a bit of time by installing pre-built images.
For VirtualBox:
»www.oracle.com/technetwork/commu···dex.html
»virtualboxes.org/images/


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to morisato
Ubuntu is normally installed by booting the install disk as a live-CD, and then running the installer from inside of Ubuntu itself. IIRC it will remember the changes you make before the install, so the install process is actually more like a "make permanent" process.

The idea was that it gets you up and running instantly, and then you can install while actually using your system.

Another neat thing to try is Wubi (»www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/···nstaller). It's pretty cool. It installs Ubuntu with a Windows installer, and it shows up in the Windows Add/Remove programs and everything. It installs Ubuntu to a disk image on your Windows drive, and when you boot into Ubuntu, it mounts your Windows drive and then mounts the Ubuntu disk image from that. So if you do actually choose to uninstall Ubuntu (from the Windows uninstaller no less), it just has to delete the disk image and undo the changes to your bootloader (the one system-level change it has to make so that it can actually boot into Ubuntu) and that's it. It's very low-impact, and good for trying out Linux without really committing your machine to it.

Wubi also comes with a tool that converts a Wubi install into a full-blown installation. In that case, it will shrink your Windows partition and copy the Wubi disk image's data into the real partition, and bam, now you've got a normal Ubuntu install instead of the running-from-a-disk-image-on-windows-partition install.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org

sil

join:2007-06-30
ON
reply to ekster
this is how i'm giving mint a try.. (I used this »www.pendrivelinux.com/)


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23

1 recommendation

reply to morisato
Linux Mint ships WUBI on all their install disks (they call their fork "mint4win"). You should be able to put any 64-bit (apparently 32-bit one has the software but doesn't support it) Mint install disc into your Windows machine and install Mint via mint4win.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org

abcjak

join:2012-12-18
reply to morisato
I would recommend sticking with the main distros...any one at all. Maybe you could start with one of the distro's geared towards a certain type of user but you're really killing yourself in the long run. If you learn how things are done in the generic way, you can use ANY distro afterwards...and i mean ANY other distro because they're 95% the same at their foundations. If you want a bsd, pick a mainstream BSD.. freebsd, openbsd, whatever. BSD ports kicks butt, btw.

If you want a linux, start with fedora, slack, debian, turbo, or another main distro, and learn how to use them from the command line. After that, you can avoid all the proprietary utilities and config tools that railroad you into doing things in unconventional ways. when you realize they are all the same underneath, you will be free to switch between most distros transparently, it's completely liberating when you learn to config and do things from a terminal. go vi! the cli is of of the best ways to manage a server remotely too.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to morisato
Slackware is definitely NOT a good distro to start off with, nor is it particularly mainstream these days (DistroWatch has it as #11 amongst all *nix). TurboLinux is super niche, #96, so I don't know why you would suggest sticking with a mainstream distro and then naming one of the most obscure niche distros possible.

The order of popularity of *nix distros is a bit surprising these days, but the ordering is:

1) Mint (3.5k HPD)
2) Mageia (2.6k HPD)
3) Ubuntu (1.9k HPD)
4) Fedora (1.4k HPD)
5) openSUSE (1.3k HPD)
6) Debian (1.3k HPD)
7) Arch (1.2k HPD)
8) PCLinuxOS (1.1k HPD)
9) Zorin (0.9k HPD)
10) CentOS (0.8k HPD)
11) Slackware (0.8k HPD)
...
96) TurboLinux (0.1k HPD)

Those are average hits per day over the last 6 months; it's not actual marketshare, but it's the best indicator anybody has about relative distro popularity.

EDIT: Mageia is what used to be Mandriva which is what used to be Mandrake which was an ease-of-use focused fork of Redhat Linux, FYI.

The difference between Linux and BSD is, at the heart, pretty much invisible to the users, and the kernels are largely interchangeable. They're both POSIX kernels that run all the same software. The differentiation comes more almost entirely from the typical userland provided by the distro. When you look at a multi-kernel distro that provides the same userland for Linux versus a BSD kernel, like Debian Linux versus Debian kFreeBSD, you'd be hard pressed to spot the difference in day to day use.
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Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org

abcjak

join:2012-12-18
yeah, that would be the case if you think the global authority on linux is distrowatch.org ...now .com. and even distrowatch themselves say their rankings don't mean a lot, it's only the sum of clicks on their own website. Turbo is the biggest distro in china and several other asian countries, that is why it's important on a global scale and easy to get support with. It IS one of the leading distros globally speaking.

Learning the generic ways to deal with configs, common problems and methodologies by avoiding the smaller niche market distros enables you to jump distro at any time and your knowledge can be applied across all distros.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to morisato
A distro that is only popular in China is not going to have good support resources outside of China, so unless the OP speaks Chinese, that's not going to be helpful.

Slackware is one of the "do everything by hand manually" distributions. It didn't even have a package manager until very recently, and even then it doesn't handle dependencies at all. It's a distribution strictly for extremely experienced linux admins, and it's a terrible choice for somebody just getting their feet wet.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org