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IowaCowboy
Want to go back to Iowa
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

MDU lockbox question

I am wondering if it is possible to have Comcast install a lockbox on the duplex I live in as there are two units and the original underground lines have both gone bad. Comcast redid my underground line and did a poor job by just pulling a bare RG 6 cable around the back of the house (where it could easily be damaged by lawn equipment) and the neighbor's line went bad so they ran an overhead from his side to a pole in a neighboring yard. I was thinking it would be easier to just pull a hard line to the back of the house, put in a lockbox with a two way tap and run the lines into each side. The neighbor's line is still live even though he canceled his subscription but he is maybe only getting 1 or 2 government access channels if that (our system is all digital and even the basic tier requires a converter).

The duplex used to be part of a complex of 52 units in 26 buildings (all townhouse style) and they were all built at the same time. The original developer sold our building to another person. I think considering the turnover of tenants in the development, Comcast should just pull hard line to each building and install two-way taps in lock boxes on the front or back of each building as the original underground drops are nearing the end of their useful lives and it would just be easier to pull one hard line to each building and run RG 6 to each unit in the duplexes. When the units were build, we had the old dual A/B cable system but I think with a single cable system, I think lock boxes with hard line going to each building would be better.

It would also make disconnects/reconnects easier for the techs considering the turnover of tenants as underground drops can be a pain in the butt (especially if the lines lack tags) as you have to tone each line and the ground blocks in these buildings are in the basements (which requires accessing each unit).



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:3

1 edit

said by IowaCowboy:

... The neighbor's line is still live even though he canceled his subscription but he is maybe only getting 1 or 2 government access channels if that (our system is all digital and even the basic tier requires a converter).
:
It would also make disconnects/reconnects easier for the techs considering the turnover of tenants as underground drops can be a pain in the butt (especially if the lines lack tags) as you have to tone each line and the ground blocks in these buildings are in the basements (which requires accessing each unit).

You do realize that you just provided an example of the main argument that the cable companies gave the FCC to lift the ban on encrypting the basic tier channels.

Cablejim1087

join:2012-09-21
Bath, ME
reply to IowaCowboy

Up here we will do that for MDU's using self support hardline if the Landlord pays for the self support cable and the design will along the new tap cut in. 9 out of 10 times its no issue. The self support is cheaper that having the regular hardline installed. It essentially hangs like a regular drop. You would probably get a terminated 4 or 8 value tap put in. Our basic tier hasnt been encrypted yet so you would still get on average 18 channels here depending on how your tv tunes in the stations. See if they would go the self support route for you.



IowaCowboy
Want to go back to Iowa
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

said by Cablejim1087:

Up here we will do that for MDU's using self support hardline if the Landlord pays for the self support cable and the design will along the new tap cut in. 9 out of 10 times its no issue. The self support is cheaper that having the regular hardline installed. It essentially hangs like a regular drop. You would probably get a terminated 4 or 8 value tap put in. Our basic tier hasnt been encrypted yet so you would still get on average 18 channels here depending on how your tv tunes in the stations. See if they would go the self support route for you.

Do they do that with duplexes or do they just run two drop wires out to the street. In my case the lines are underground. I was thinking the cable company would possibly do it this way to make their job easier because the drops in this development are reaching end of life. In my case Comcast replaced the drop at their expense.

Cable Employ

join:2012-07-23
Saint Paul, MN
reply to IowaCowboy

With the cost to install that on every duplex, it would not make financial sense to do. Running 2 RG-6 drops to the place is much cheaper to do, not to mention the fact that the rest of the plant after that would possibly have to be re-designed. Here, if it is a 4 unit building, there is a 50/50 chance of hard line being run to it, anything over 4 they will, but no chance for just a duplex. Replacing an RG-6 cable that is bad, especially if it is aerial, is a lot cheaper than running hard line for possibly two customers.


Cablejim1087

join:2012-09-21
Bath, ME
reply to IowaCowboy

Duplexes as well as apartments. I live in a duplex and it has self support with a terminated 8 value tap. Previous owner paid the install. it goes UG from arial. I have a back easement.



gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to IowaCowboy

you dont need to tone if they are tagged properly....

also from the system i worked in duplexes rarely have hardline unless they are a good distance away requiring a hardline drop.

if 2 6 drops are run, and signal is sufficient then who cares?

you say running hardline with taps is easier, as a line tech, no its not, cause then I have to come and dig up the hardline when it gets damaged, when a service guy who is called out in the first place could have done it.

that is the reason i hate when hardline is used for long drops.
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