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brokenpromis

join:2012-01-14
Worcester, MA

[billing] Stuck on 3 Mbps in an area offering up to 7 Mbps

Currently on the grandfathered dry loop package for 1.1 – 3 Mbps High Speed Internet Enhanced which I’ve signed up years ago. However, Verizon is offering 3.1 – 7 Mbps for High Speed Internet Enhanced in my area. I’ve just spent over two hours on the phone with both tech support and customer service asking for an upgrade to the highest tier.

Their answer was that no changes can be made to my account without adding a phone line. Could someone please offer me any advice on how I should go about this? Thanks in advance.

larry2617

join:2008-03-29
Hardy, VA
The Only Option Is To Add A Phone Line Since They Ended Dry Loop(Naked DSL).


AMDUSER
Premium
join:2003-05-28
Earth,
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·Time Warner Cable

1 recommendation

The other alternative it to call Dsl Extreme [who resells Verizon], [ 1-(866) 243-8638 ]- switch - and have it upgraded. - As they are not required by VZ to have regular POTS service on any DSL service lines.

»www.dslextreme.com/dsl/residential

- Select Verizon pricing link... to see speeds and pricing.

brokenpromis

join:2012-01-14
Worcester, MA
reply to brokenpromis
Thanks... But it seems unfair since I'm paying for the highest tier package but not receiving promised speed offered for my area.

neilemon

join:2010-06-06
united state
I empathize with your situation, but I wouldn't expect fairness.

My lines were damaged from hurricane Sandy and rather than repair the lines, my DSL has been cut to 1.5 Mbs . I had 3Mbs for years, and I get lower speed at the same price now.

Only suggestion is when you talk to a rep, tell them you need to "escalate" the issue and need reach their "escalation dept." since they cannot help you.

This is an article about no more dry loop.

»Verizon Stops Selling Standalone DSL to New Users


trp2525
Premium
join:2008-02-24
Fall River, MA
reply to brokenpromis
Personally I don't think that DSL Extreme is a bargain for dry-loop service on their Verizon 7.1 pricing plan. The price with no contract is $54.95/month ($44.95/month with a 1-year contract).

Verizon offers their High Speed Internet Enhanced DSL (speeds up to 15 depending on what is available or possible in your area) along with Verizon Freedom Essentials phone service (which includes unlimited local and long distance calling plus 5 calling features) for $54.99/month with no contract required. If you don't want the unlimited long distance you can get the same package with Verizon Regional Essentials phone service for $44.99/month with no contract required. There will be additional taxes and fees added because of the phone line so check with Verizon beforehand to get that pricing information for your area.


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY
Ah, but that's really where the issue lies... taxes on top of phone service can add up to as much as $15-$20 depending on where you live, and you're stuck paying for a service you have pretty much no intention of using. Taxes on dry-loop amount to maybe $4 or $5 (sometimes even less), since it's not a regulated service. If 15 meg service is offered at the OP's loop length, it MIGHT make getting a phone line worth the aggravation, otherwise, I'd either switch to DSLExtreme or go with cable, which in many cases will likely offer much faster service with fewer tie-ups or taxes...
--
Physics: Will you break the laws of physics, or will the laws of physics break you?
If physicists stand on each other's shoulders, computer scientists stand on each other's toes, and computer programmers dig each other's graves.


trp2525
Premium
join:2008-02-24
Fall River, MA
said by a333:

Ah, but that's really where the issue lies... taxes on top of phone service can add up to as much as $15-$20 depending on where you live, and you're stuck paying for a service you have pretty much no intention of using. Taxes on dry-loop amount to maybe $4 or $5 (sometimes even less), since it's not a regulated service. If 15 meg service is offered at the OP's loop length, it MIGHT make getting a phone line worth the aggravation, otherwise, I'd either switch to DSLExtreme or go with cable, which in many cases will likely offer much faster service with fewer tie-ups or taxes...

It all depends on what your needs are, what's important to you and what you consider "true value" in purchasing these internet and/or phone services. Personally I have the Verizon Double Play Bundle that gives me 7.1 DSL service along with unlimited local and long-distance calling. I pay $54.99 plus about $13 in taxes and fees so my total monthly cost is approximately $68 which, for me, represents true value.

I have no need for more than 7.1 internet speed at this time and I actually use (and need) my home phone for faxing and for regular local and long-distance calling. I also like the reliability and dependability of a POTS line for emergencies and especially during power outages. Comcast phone service will not work during an extended power outage after its backup battery goes dead.

I investigated getting the same two phone and internet services from Comcast and while their pricing was comparable for the 6-month introductory period, my monthly cost would be over $90/month afterwards. Granted their internet speed was faster (15 Mbps I believe) but like I already stated I have no need for that speed at this time. Stand-alone internet service from Comcast for 6 Mbps service was $49.99 plus a monthly modem rental fee which brought the price to what I am paying now for phone and internet from Verizon. In addition Comcast's 6 Mbps plan would be a speed decrease for me compared to the 7.1 I am currently getting from Verizon DSL.

So the bottom line is you have to decide what you actually need at your home and shop accordingly. What might be great for me and save me a lot of money each month might not meet your needs or work for you. Generally speaking if you bundle your services with one provider (phone, internet and/or TV), you usually get better pricing/value than going a-la-carte from multiple providers but as always YMMV.


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY
*shrug* I suppose if you actually use the landline it can be argued to be a worthwhile deal... I personally don't see the point, especially with the deteriorating quality of the copper POTS network in many places (no more legendary "4 nines" Bell System reliability these days, and at least in downtown NYC, many areas were/are STILL without phone service for 2-3+ weeks because of 65+ year-old copper, and the havoc caused by Sandy), multiple cell phones in the house, and VOIP (voip.ms actually stayed up throughout the storm, as did my cell phones. Same can't really be said about cable/POTS users in other areas of NYC.)
But yes, by all means, if you want phone service, chances are that the bundles work out to a comparable deal. However, reliability is no longer really a forte of copper POTS (FiOS users with a UPS actually have MUCH better uptime than copper users, due to the required upkeep of copper compared to fiber infrastructure). Not to mention, most of the time, POTS plans and features are horribly overpriced, and depending on your area, call quality isn't the best (again, aging copper infrastructure that Verizon doesn't really want to maintain.) The only major reason to keep POTS service (as in your case) is if you regularly use a fax machine, as that is the one device in a modern household that still requires an analog phone line.
--
Physics: Will you break the laws of physics, or will the laws of physics break you?
If physicists stand on each other's shoulders, computer scientists stand on each other's toes, and computer programmers dig each other's graves.