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n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA

1 edit
reply to ejg1

Re: Want to go with a SSD now...

Click for full size
P7P55D-E manual page 2-2
I pulled that info from the manual for the P7P55D-E. Your description matches what I saw listed. Ideally you would use the video card in the top x16 slot (blue one) and use any SATA PCIe cards in the black one.

On the above picture, #11 are the Intel ports, 10 (and 9) are the JMicron ports, and 8 are the Marvell ports. The Intel ones should be turned on by default.

I second Octavean See Profile's suggestion. About the only time you'll notice any difference in speed is when doing big sequential transfers, and it will still be fast regardless. The biggest improvement with SSDs are with random access performance, and any SATA-equipped system will see big gains (even 1.5 Gbps).
--
KI6RIT


ejg1

join:2004-12-01
Pacifica, CA
Ok so considering all the information up till now…

Option 1, is to buy a Samsung Pro 256Gb SSD and run it through the Marvell. Test the throughput and compare it to the throughput of running it off the Intel SATA II ports. Total cost $269. Pros: drive can be taken to future build Cons: Pay todays price premium for the drive and only reap ½ the potential performance. It is possible this drive gets antiquated by the time I get to my next build.

Option 2, do the same as above except with an OCZ Vertex-2 240Gb SATA II drive for $140. Pros: Save $130 for most likely the same performance as what I would get with the Samsung in either scenario of option 1. Cons: Harder to take the drive to an existing build because by the time I want to do a new build, this drive will be too antiquated anyway.

Option 3, I still have not explored. I know a guy selling two 500Gb Raptors for $140 which WD says has transfer rates of 200MB/S. If I raid these two together would not they at least match/exceed the OCZ Vertez which has 285 seq read and 275 seq write? The raptors are listed as SATA III drives. My P7P55D-E Users guide also says my board has “Intel Matrix Storage Technology supporting SATA RAID 0,1,5 and 10" on the Intel P55 chipset.

I am assuming this RAID on my MB is SATA II since it is going through the P55 and since the Raptors are SATA III does this mean this option wont work? Anybody have any insight into this?


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
I've run a 4x60GB RAID 0 SSD array on an Intel SATA 3G controller and was able to hit a max of 890 MB/s seq:

»SSD Raid 0 Array 4x60GB Setup Test Run

For what it's worth I don't think Raptors will feel anything like an SSD even in a RAID 0 array.


FizzyMyNizzy

join:2004-05-29
New York, NY

1 edit
reply to ejg1
I vote for option 4. Don't get anything. Until you are getting your next upgrade.

In the meantime you could enjoy this samsung SSD song:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-d-rRkV4fo


ejg1

join:2004-12-01
Pacifica, CA
reply to Octavean
So you ran tests of
1 Kingston SSD
2 Kingston SSDs in Raid0
3 Kingston SSDs in Raid0
3 Kings+1OCZ Agility in Raid0
all on the onboard Intel SATA II ports.

This brings me back to one of my previous questions. Has anybody used the onboard Intel SATA RAID built into the P7P55D-E board? If I read your test properly I may be able to on-board RAID two OCZs for the same throughput as the Samsung Pro. I will try googling to see if anybody has feedback on my boards RAID.

Fizzy-The reason I am doing this is I need more disk space and dont see my present system being obsolete for many years yet. When I built the system, SSDs were very pricy at low capacities so I went the small WD route thinking I would upgrade later when prices subside. That time is now.


ejg1

join:2004-12-01
Pacifica, CA
I think I have my answer.

I found a post exactly fitting my needs over on the Toms threads: »www.tomshardware.com/forum/28472···hci-raid

Quote:
It is certainly possible to boot from a RAID 0 volume. I use the P7P55D-E and set up two disks in a RAID 0 config on the Intel controller. However, this I did before installing Windows 7 (Home Premium). I did not have to load RAID drivers - Windows picked it up straight away and I did not have the slightest problem installing the operating system or booting from it.

What this means to me is if I buy 2xOCZ Vertex-2 240Gb SATA II drive for $140 and Raid0 them I would pay just about the same as a single Samsung Pro 512. My throughput would be about the same as the rated Samsung and I would not be throttled by the Marvell at SATA II speeds as many posters experienced. This setup should take me out at least another 5 years into the future. From there forward, I will continue to rely on USB3.0 for backups.

Anything I may have overlooked?


trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2
reply to ejg1
There was some talk over on the HardOCP forums regarding the 840 vs. 840 Pro SSDs. The general consensus is that the 840 despite the fact that it uses TLC (Triple-Level Cell NAND) and because of that there is a chance for reduced lifetime, for most users the life of the 840 SSD will far outlive the life of the machine that it's installed in.

Write speeds are a bit reduced as versus the 840 Pro but I too compared the numbers and 95% of the users out there (at least this is my opinion) won't notice the difference.

Samsung 840 Series TLC 250GB SSD Review @ HardOCP Forums
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog | AOKP (The Android Open Kang Project)


ejg1

join:2004-12-01
Pacifica, CA
reply to Octavean
Hey Octavean,

When you did your progression of SSD raid testing, where there any concerns about how TRIM gets managed once two or more drives got put into an array?

That is, I seem to remember the TRIM topic getting complicated for those wanting to RAID their final SSD build. Would I have anything to worry about there?


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
Generally speaking I view SSD units as I would video cards. I think it best to buy the fastest single video card one can afford rather then two or more lower-end cards to SLI or XFire together.

From my experience I haven't seen much in the way of performance degradation due to a lack of TRIM support in a RAID 0 array. This was likely due to aggressive garbage collection or the fact that I didn't thrash the drives with a lot of writes / erasures.

The Kingston SSDNow V series SNV425-S2 model does very well maintaining performance with or without TRIM as was outlined in the pcper.com review I linked to in the SSD Raid 0 Array 4x60GB thread. This is partly why I was comfortable trying the Array in the first place. It was never the fastest SSD out there but it was resilient and consistent.

I'm transitioning to newer hardware like the X79 and possibly Z77 or its successor Haswell LGA1150. This hardware negates the issue of TRIM in a RAID 0 array because presumably Intel has and will support TRIM in such configurations.