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PX Eliezer7
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reply to ccclark

Re: [General] June 15, 2018

When I first saw your headline I thought that this was the new calculated date for the Mayans.

It was quite a shock.

Think this will go smoothly? Will they keep the target date?

Near the end of [Blazing Saddles] this dialog occurs:

[Bart is bidding farewell to the people of Rock Ridge]

Bart: Work here is done. I'm needed elsewhere now. I'm needed wherever outlaws rule the West, wherever innocent women and children are afraid to walk the streets, wherever a man cannot live in simple dignity, wherever a people cry out for justice.

Crowd: [in unison] BULL-SHIT!



ccclark

@astound.net

Not sure what you mean with the Blazing Saddles reference. Are you saying that this replacement of the underlying switched network structure is already done and it is bullshit?


PX Eliezer7
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1 edit

said by ccclark :

Not sure what you mean with the Blazing Saddles reference. Are you saying that this replacement of the underlying switched network structure is already done and it is bullshit?

I'm saying:

1) It's just bull.

2) This is a Daniel Berninger vehicle. Actually this is redundant with (1). 'Nuff said.

3) Did you read the comments following the article you linked to? Almost every person was negative, raising objections relating to reliability, security, cost, practicality, etc.

4) The telephone landscape is even more diverse than it used to be. Even if AT&T, Verizon, and CenturyTel agree on something (which is far from certain because Wall Street looks to the short term) there are a lot of other players involved.

5) I point out to you also the extreme lack of progress with IPv6, and for that matter that this country can't even adopt the metric system (except for one highway in Delaware).

Old "Benny Hill" routine, paraphrased:

Reverend: I'm lost, can you please tell me how to get to the post office?

Biker guy: Well, just go two blocks up this street, turn right at the crack house, turn left at the cathouse, and you'll see it.

Reverend: My son, leave your evil life. Follow me, and I will lead you to the Kingdom of Heaven.

Biker guy: Follow you to the Kingdom of Heaven ?! You don't even know where the bleedin' post office is !

Thus my view of Mr. Berninger in 2012/2013.


ccclark

@astound.net

said by PX Eliezer7:

2) This is a Daniel Berninger vehicle. Actually this is redundant with (1). 'Nuff said.

You say Berninger's name with considerable venom. I'm just a home VOIP user and not an industry insider. I've never heard of him. Does this guy have a long history of lies that has pissed you off and I should be aware of?

said by PX Eliezer7:

3) Did you read the comments following the article you linked to? Almost every person was negative, raising objections relating to reliability, security, cost, practicality, etc.

I did read the comments in the at the tail end of the IEEE article, but they appeared to me to center mostly around the "last mile" issue of maintaining basic service (dial tone) if the power goes out. I thought they missed the point about these changes occurring internal to the switched network ***BEHIND*** the last mile. Does the consolidation of central offices (the real estate "windfall") imply that the last mile copper would be ripped out or abandoned for everyone? Must fiber to the curb necessarily omit the power aspect? Couldn't the cable to the user's phone/modem end up being something akin to a USB cable that bundles power and data?

I thought a more interesting point in the IEEE comments was about the regulatory aspect. That pressing to have all their network services be classified as unregulated broadband (FCC Type II?) so that the major carriers can get out from being regulated telecom.

garys_2k
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I think the idea is to eliminate the copper runs from each premises to the Central Office. Those CO's usually have diesel generators that supply the loop current powering the customers' phones (simple phones, not wireless or those that need to be plugged into a wall wart).

If you eliminate the copper you eliminate the ability to centrally power the customers' equipment, so no more days-long power outage phone use. Most customers that have fiber may have a few hours of backup use, run by batteries in their local equipment, if the power is out. Same for subscribers to cable company phones or VoIP users. You may be able to run a backup generator at your house for days but unless all the upstream stuff is powered, too, your phone will still be dead.


PX Eliezer7
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reply to ccclark

You raise many interesting points and issues.

I can only say relating to your original question that this changeover will not be complete, not even substantially complete, by June 2018.

---------------

Mr. Berninger has been associated with Free World Dialup (innovative in its time) which later became FWD and then sputtered away.

Actually, they decided to start charging $ 30 a year but since the same thing could be obtained elsewhere for free, it just died.

See for example:
»[FWD] Free world dialup

Fast-forward:

A later project of his is SIPtoSIP (not to be confused with Sip2Sip) which charges people $ 100 a year for the same SIP services that you could get for free (including HD wideband G.722) from a CallCentric IP Freedom account or from a number of other providers.

Here:
»www.siptosip.net/

Note that that website has a suggested devices page, and the devices it links to are no longer current (such as a Gigaset A580IP). Indeed, the content of the pages seems to have been not updated for several years....



mgraves1
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Have you actually met Mr Berninger? Discussed things with the man? I have, and on more than a few occasions. I expect that the two of you merely travel in very different circles. In the regulatory space he's doing good work with the major ILECs, even if its value to you may not presently be obvious.

Michael


PX Eliezer7
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said by mgraves1:

In the regulatory space he's doing good work with the major ILECs, even if its value to you may not presently be obvious.

I am glad to hear that, and wish him success.

But this whole project has previously been discussed here.
»(Ooma) Voice Communications Exchange (VCXC)

In that thread, it was discussed that this "committee" requires payment of $10,000 per MONTH per COMPANY.

This committee does NOT actually provide any phone equipment or such, they just TALK and make REPORTS and RECOMMENDATIONS.

Sort of like the United Nations....

Now, consider the finances of this committee:

$10,000 a month multiplied by 12 months multiplied by about 45 companies who are members is well over 5 million dollars a year.

I may be an ignorant dope, but that seems like a lot of money to spend on coffee....

Especially when the biggest players (AT&T and Verizon) have huge in-house engineering and business staffs of their own.

So is this really needed, or is it like the fairy tale [The Emperor's New Clothes]?

We will see.

Best of luck to those involved.


mgraves1
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said by PX Eliezer7:

$10,000 a month multiplied by 12 months multiplied by about 45 companies who are members is well over 5 million dollars a year.

I may be an ignorant dope, but that seems like a lot of money to spend on coffee....

I expect that VCXC is a lot like USTelecom or CTIA, but As an industry trade association with a legal and regulatory focus it has a requirement for lawyers and lobbyists...hence the need for funds.
--
Michael Graves
Houston TX
»www.mgraves.org

PX Eliezer7
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Good points, and as I said I do wish them luck.

But they depart from other industry and trade groups in charging the same dues to every company [regardless of size].

Most industry groups---even down to local Chambers of Commerce---charge based on relative annual revenue, or numbers of employees, or some such.

Charging the same 10,000 monthly dues to a huge company like AT&T as to a tiny company like ZipDX, just seems strange.

As Trev said in the older thread, such a policy ensures that the smaller companies will not join, or will drop out.