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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

Crooked business practices

Before I upgraded to the Xfinity Triple Play Premium (that includes the AnyRoom DVR, all the premiums, and the Sports Entertainment Package in the base price), I had to pay extra for the Sports Entertainment Package to get Turner Classic Movies and Fox Movie Channel (which I want those channels because my mother likes old movies).

Here's a thought: Put TCM and FMC on the expanded basic or digital preferred and put all the ESPN channels on the Sports Entertainment Package as ESPN is a sports channel. Putting TCM and FMC on a $7.95/tier is another way to milk elderly customers (many who are on fixed incomes) out of their limited dollars just so they can watch the movies of their generation. My mother is 56 years old but TCM and FMC are popular among elderly subscribers as those channels play the movies from their glory days when they were young (and grandma tells me about the days when you could get into the movies for 11 cents and popcorn and soda were 5 cents each). Now you need to mortgage the house just to afford admission to the movies. Forget about popcorn and soda, that will be a whole paycheck just to pay for that.

Grandma was a child (born 1932) during the Great Depression so people back then had very little money. Her mother died in 1934 when grandma was 2 and she was raised by her grandmother and eventually her aunt and they had very little money. They got $5 per week in welfare payments, the rent was $3.50 per week. This is in 1930s dollars.

Many people from the Depression era are very frugal, they drive in hot cars because they don't want to turn on the A/C, they buy the cheapest store brand food at Walmart, and they are very cheap with their money. Some of them keep cash in their house because they don't trust banks.


jc100

join:2002-04-10

1) Older people do enjoy their movies
2) 56 is elderly? I'm guessing you are very very young.

56 is Middle Aged not elderly. You make someone that age appear to be an invalid. My mom is in her 60s and if my dad were alive, the mid 60s. Grandparents are approaching 90. Lifespan is a lot longer and trust me bud, 56 isn't "elderly".

Set in their ways and having not grown up with technology? - Possibly. However, by no means elderly.

Now you want elderly, check out folks in their 80s+ and then you'll definitely have the demographic you're referring to.



FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

said by jc100:

1) Older people do enjoy their movies
2) 56 is elderly? I'm guessing you are very very young.

56 is Middle Aged not elderly. You make someone that age appear to be an invalid. My mom is in her 60s and if my dad were alive, the mid 60s. Grandparents are approaching 90. Lifespan is a lot longer and trust me bud, 56 isn't "elderly".

Set in their ways and having not grown up with technology? - Possibly. However, by no means elderly.

Now you want elderly, check out folks in their 80s+ and then you'll definitely have the demographic you're referring to.

My uncle is 91 and is on Facebook almost every day and uses a smartphone. So even some of the "elderly" stay up somewhat on latest technology. But he is probably an exception. My dad is 90 and he has mastered a cable remote control. But that is the extent of his being able to deal with technology.
--
A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves money from the public treasury.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to jc100

said by jc100:

1) Older people do enjoy their movies
2) 56 is elderly? I'm guessing you are very very young.

56 is Middle Aged not elderly. You make someone that age appear to be an invalid. My mom is in her 60s and if my dad were alive, the mid 60s. Grandparents are approaching 90. Lifespan is a lot longer and trust me bud, 56 isn't "elderly".

Set in their ways and having not grown up with technology? - Possibly. However, by no means elderly.

Now you want elderly, check out folks in their 80s+ and then you'll definitely have the demographic you're referring to.

I am not saying my mother is elderly (she is middle aged and she comes from the baby boomer generation, whom are rapidly approaching retirement) but they do play a lot of the movies from the '60s and '70s on there. She just enjoys the older movies as her viewing preference. She also likes Law & Order (as long as the episode has Jerry Orbach in them).

What I was saying that those channels are popular among the older generation. The point to my post is to address the fact they charge extra for channels popular among the older generation (many of them on fixed/low income). There was controversy a few years ago when Comcast wanted to move EWTN (which costs Comcast nothing in carriage costs) to the expanded basic from limited basic and that channel is popular among elderly viewers as well and basic is $5.32 per month whereas expanded basic is $60 per month. The mayor of Holyoke (MA) where the controversy was taking place even offered to forfeit a PEG channel but Comcast would not budge. Comcast made some lame excuse. Milking elderly or disabled customers is not an ethical business practice.

Comcast and Time Warner should bring on the carriage disputes with ESPN and drop them if necessary to get ESPN to cave in with lower fees. Comcast seems to never have carriage disputes but Time Warner is famous for carriage disputes.

jc100

join:2002-04-10
reply to FFH

My grandfather is 88 and uses Email and basic browsing. My cousin has helped my 89 year old grandma use skype.

However, we're talking EXCEPTIONS to the general rule. I'd say a large majority the WWII Era generation (80 plus) aren't abreast with computers.

Of course, computer literacy increases with each prior generation. Individuals my mother's age (60+) or say 50-70 are moderately to mildly proficient. Again, we're generalizing but you've got a lot of diversity within this subset.

30-49 I'd say are pretty proficient though some segments aren't connected. I fall into this category. I've got friends who can't do more than email and basics, but own smartphones, and so on. Others are a lot more tech savvy than I. The large majority know computers to some degree.

29 and Younger I'd say are proficient and grew up with technology. Depends on what Generation Expert, 29 and younger are Millennial. Population Census Bureau lists anyone 1983+ as Gen Y (1982 is a Cusp Year with Some listing it as "X" and Others "Y"). All agree 1983 is Gen Y. Kids in this group other than the oldest have had technology their whole life and run laps around the above.


jc100

join:2002-04-10
reply to IowaCowboy

Unfortunately,

T.V. Stations know their demographics and how to monopolize on revenue. Public outcry en masse is the only way to enact a reversal of policy. A few people complaining is overlooked as a couple of unhappy individuals. The good thing about truly old people is if you mess with their stubborn ways, they do speak out.



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to jc100

My mother (56 years old) is pretty proficient using a Mac and surfing the web. She likes to play computer games and go on forums (she is not on DSLR as she does not share the same interests that I have). She knows the operation side of computers but does not know much about the technical side. She has a basic phone (Samsung Convoy II) on my Verizon ShareEverything plan and she knows how to operate that. She uses her cell phone for her primary phone but uses the home phone to locate her cell phone as she is notorious for misplacing it in the house. I use the home phone at home and my iPhone 5 on the go and the home phone (Comcast digital voice) also feeds the burglar alarm dialer.

I am 29 years old (born 1983).


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms

3 recommendations

reply to jc100

said by jc100:

Of course, computer literacy increases with each prior generation. Individuals my mother's age (60+) or say 50-70 are moderately to mildly proficient. Again, we're generalizing but you've got a lot of diversity within this subset.

I'm 57 and am pretty damn proficient with computers and with VoIP.

My wife is 57 and is a retired software engineer (IEEE and ACM member).

Bill Gates is also 57.

A lot of the younger generations don't stop to think of who MADE the PC and the Internet in the first place!


Steve Mehs
Gun Control Is Using A Steady Hand
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1
reply to IowaCowboy

quote:
Comcast and Time Warner should bring on the carriage disputes with ESPN and drop them if necessary to get ESPN to cave in with lower fees. Comcast seems to never have carriage disputes but Time Warner is famous for carriage disputes.
That would be the dumbest move ever. Care to guess what is by far the highest rated cable TV event of the week, every week from the beginning of September to the end of December? That would be Monday Night Football on ESPN. Despite what sports haters wish to believe, sports on TV and sports in general is insanely popular.
--
iPhone: 4” 1136 X 640 Display, 1.30 GHz Dual Core Processor, 1 GB RAM
MyPhone: 5” 1920 X 1080 Display, 1.50 GHz Quad Core Processor, 2 GB RAM
So tell me, why is exactly is the iPhone so great?
Droid Does What Jobs Won’t Let You Do.


skuv

@rr.com
reply to jc100

While 56 is certainly not elderly, it is also clearly not middle aged either.

The expected lifetime of someone in the US is not 100+ years.

Middle age is around 40.


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms

The New American Heritage dictionary defines middle age as "the period between youth and adulthood, generally 40 to 60." The Oxford English Dictionary cites 45 to 60, while Webster's and the U.S. Census Bureau peg middle age at 45 to 64. The nonprofit Pew Research Center uses 50 to 64 (dubbing it the "threshold generation") and classifies those between 30 and 49 in its "younger adult" category.

»www.aarp.org/personal-growth/tra···tin.html


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to Steve Mehs

said by Steve Mehs:

quote:
Comcast and Time Warner should bring on the carriage disputes with ESPN and drop them if necessary to get ESPN to cave in with lower fees. Comcast seems to never have carriage disputes but Time Warner is famous for carriage disputes.
That would be the dumbest move ever. Care to guess what is by far the highest rated cable TV event of the week, every week from the beginning of September to the end of December? That would be Monday Night Football on ESPN. Despite what sports haters wish to believe, sports on TV and sports in general is insanely popular.

Think of the revenue they'd get if ESPN was on a premium tier. They'd be rolling in even more cash if Monday Night Football was on Pay Per View.

I pay a boatload for my cable subscription. Why should I be paying for for a channel I don't watch (especially since it cost them $5 out of the $199 per month on my triple play). They need to roll over and get tough on programming costs to cut down on cord cutters.

The only interest I have in Sports is hoping the Chicago Cubs win the World Series in my lifetime and I sport a Chicago Cubs hat when I go out (at least it keeps me out of the heat of the Yankees vs Red Sox debate. I also like minor league baseball and my favorite team in minor league is the Cedar Rapids Kernals.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to PX Eliezer7

because those people are not calling into tech support.

Younger generations are actually very poor with computers. They might be better at facebook than me(im 32). But most do not even know what a router is. when i was working Comcast Tech support I would get people who I could tell where in college and they did not even know how to power cycle a router or how to hook the cable box to the TV set.(even worse when its HDTV, the HDMI cable is not rocket science.)

Better at tech my ass.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


PX Eliezer7
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Reviews:
·callwithus
·voip.ms

said by Kearnstd:

Younger generations are actually very poor with computers....

Better at tech my ass.

You are correct.

When my daughter started college last fall, we needed to visit the IT department because of a specific glitch getting her computer on their LAN.

I was astounded to see college kids down there who had NO IDEA how to do easy tasks such as updating their Windows software (which was a requirement for getting online with the college).

jc100

join:2002-04-10
reply to PX Eliezer7

PX,

With your subset, I know a large many of people who know computers and a large many of people who can barely power on the device. The 50-70 age range is extremely diverse. The younger batch 50-60 are far more likely to integrate than their older counterparts. None the less, there are more than plenty who fear computers. Again, I stated this is a generalization.

Yet, you can be sure that you are neither the normal nor the exception. You're the Median. It's a very large bell curve. Your generation might have invented the computer, but your generation excluding the engineers, lacked technology growing up.


jc100

join:2002-04-10
reply to Kearnstd

And being we fall into the 30-49 Age range... Id say we've seen technology quite a bit. However, I'm 30 and I didn't own a personal computer (not counting the Atari) until I was 16. I taught myself much of what I know. i have friends nearing a few years older than I that are using smartphones but are pretty limited on their understanding of computers.

I'd put it this way. Kids growing up now are connected from birth. Whether they know the fundamentals is a bit tricky. Most are younger so while they know Facebook at 12 or 13, we can't surmise what 15 or 20 years brings. Kids understand their phones, browsing, etc.

Certainly, kids today have no clue about DOS. I took Dos in high school and I forget just about every bit of it. I also despise Linux (ya ya string me up). I know some but nothing to brag. However, I can set up a router, build a computer, troubleshoot, get file sharing going, etc etc. I'm sure a lot kids today don't know.

However, they are still young and we're second guessing their abilities once they reach adulthood.

Remember folks, the first time 50 percent of the U.S. owned a home computer wasn't until the year 2000 and internet hit the 50% mark in 2001.

Census Bureau Source on Computer Ownership



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to Steve Mehs

said by Steve Mehs:

That would be the dumbest move ever. Care to guess what is by far the highest rated cable TV event of the week, every week from the beginning of September to the end of December? That would be Monday Night Football on ESPN. Despite what sports haters wish to believe, sports on TV and sports in general is insanely popular.

MNF is also just a single "episode" (usually) each week. Look at the ratings usually for #2-20 for cable tv programming. Spongebob Squarepants, WWE Wrestling, and History/Discovery channel "reality tv" programming like Pawn Stars and Storage Wars almost always dominates. Many people would definitely would be pissed if ESPN was dropped. I bet however even more would be pissed if their 3 year old demon spawn didn't have their daily spongebob or they regularly missed their Swamp Pawn War Restoration Picker episodes.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to PX Eliezer7

said by PX Eliezer7:

said by Kearnstd:

Younger generations are actually very poor with computers....

Better at tech my ass.

You are correct.

When my daughter started college last fall, we needed to visit the IT department because of a specific glitch getting her computer on their LAN.

I was astounded to see college kids down there who had NO IDEA how to do easy tasks such as updating their Windows software (which was a requirement for getting online with the college).

If I were in college, I would obtain Internet service through a commercial provider (using a mobile broadband card if necessary) as I would not want the college snooping on my Internet usage.


JNagarya

@verizon.net
reply to jc100

What do you mean by "technology"?

When I was a kid, we had a hand-wound 78 RPM record player, and radio. I got my first one-speaker 45-LP record player at 12 -- and that was used. Got my first stereo at 16 -- and that was used. Got my first Quadraphonic (derived) at 22-ish -- and built it myself. Next was a high-end Quad I built myself.

All of that is technology.

I've been online since mid-1986 -- before the "Internet" was publicly-accessible -- beginning with a 300 baud modem. At that time we answered email online. In time we downloaded a ZIPPED file with our email, then answered those with offline readers, then uploaded the email.

All of that was dial-up. All of that was technology.

I preferred DOS, and was a late "convert" to Windows because by ISPs to switch.

Until the explosion in "devices" I was always ahead of the curve on the latest electronic technology. It is the portable phones, the cell phones (which few young people know how to use without over-amping and garbling themselves), the tablets -- all that stuff, most of which are too expensive to buy let alone learn to use.

How much repetition do we need? How many ways do we need to send email? How did the pioneers in covered wagons ever survive without "texting"? And did they have as limited a conversational ability as to find "Tweeting" acceptable?

"Facebook"? Untrustworthy; and Zuckerberg is a greedy jerk.

As for the switch from DOS to Windows: "everyone" knows how to use a GUI (Graphics User Interface); it's what goes on behind it of which they are ignorant. They are, in a word, superficial. I've built not only stereos but also computers.

What the young don't know -- they'll have to be "old" before they get it -- is that the older one becomes, the more -- not less -- one tends to know. Not being up to speed on the latest duplicative handheld electronic gadget is not spelled "stupid".


jc100

join:2002-04-10

Hmm... My response didn't post for some reason? Either pc is caching the page or what the heck happened.

Well a quick rewrite as it's late.

Technology is relative to the generation. People of the early 1900's were amazed by the advent of photography, industrial age, the radio, and television. All forms of these technologies while existing in their basic forms are far from representative of their original design. If you took a person from 1940's and stuck them in 2012/2013, they'd be at a loss.

How can a camera be the size of a pinhole? A television project 3d? A radio be portable? For these folks, black and white television, a Victrola, rudimentary automobiles, etc were the norm.

My point? Growing up with a specific technology doesn't guarantee one stays abreast or had access. There is always a segment, and while narrowing as generations become more tech savvy, that are scared of change. Usually, folks 50-60 plus are where you begin to see the "I might break it" attitude.

Yes, you are an exception to the norm. Your generation of the 50-70 has a wide variance between those who fear and those that embrace.

I'm 30 and people my demographic didn't own home computers either. The U.S. census listed 2000 as the first time 50 percent of Americans owned a computer and 2001 as the first time internet surpassed 50 percent, too. All and all, I didn't own a real personal computer until 1998. I had an Atari 800 as a kid, but played games versus any computing power. Good old 5.25's.

I give Kudos to knowing dos. Dos is the foundation of operating systems as is Unix. I know basic dos from courses I took in school. I don't remember much as I'm not much of a command line fan. Linux skills are on a need to know basis, too.

That being said, duplicating skills and technology isn't the problem. Having modern versions of an item is still crucial. You telling me that a 20 year old cell phone weighing 5 pounds and resembling a Walkie Talkie is still relevant? Times change and so do early adopters. If you don't keep up, you do lose the skills.



Steve Mehs
Gun Control Is Using A Steady Hand
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1
reply to IowaCowboy

said by IowaCowboy:

said by Steve Mehs:

quote:
Comcast and Time Warner should bring on the carriage disputes with ESPN and drop them if necessary to get ESPN to cave in with lower fees. Comcast seems to never have carriage disputes but Time Warner is famous for carriage disputes.
That would be the dumbest move ever. Care to guess what is by far the highest rated cable TV event of the week, every week from the beginning of September to the end of December? That would be Monday Night Football on ESPN. Despite what sports haters wish to believe, sports on TV and sports in general is insanely popular.

Think of the revenue they'd get if ESPN was on a premium tier. They'd be rolling in even more cash if Monday Night Football was on Pay Per View.

I pay a boatload for my cable subscription. Why should I be paying for for a channel I don't watch (especially since it cost them $5 out of the $199 per month on my triple play). They need to roll over and get tough on programming costs to cut down on cord cutters.

The only interest I have in Sports is hoping the Chicago Cubs win the World Series in my lifetime and I sport a Chicago Cubs hat when I go out (at least it keeps me out of the heat of the Yankees vs Red Sox debate. I also like minor league baseball and my favorite team in minor league is the Cedar Rapids Kernals.

Never going to happen. The NFL has the strictest TV broadcast rights among all of the major sports leagues. They would never allow what has become an American tradition for decades to be available on a PPV basis only. People on here seem to think us sports fans are some type of minority. That couldnt be more untrue. Look at football stadiums, the vast majority of games are sold out every week, if you dont count Jacksonville. When the NHL isnt lockedout look at the arenas in hockey hotbed areas like Minneapolis, Detroit and Buffalo. It was reported a while back that the Yankees sell something like 3-3.5 million tickets a year. On TV, NFL Sunday Ticket is the crown jewel of DirecTV and draws big every Fall, the UFC has no problem getting a TV audience at $50 a pop. During hockey season, here in the Buffalo market, 3 out of every 4 TVs are tuned into Sabres telecasts. When were in the playoffs, not only is the Arena jam packed with 19K fans but there is another estimated 10-12,000 people outside the Arena, last night the Arena was sold out for a minor league hockey game, making it the fourth largest crowd in AHL history. The Super Bowl is the biggest TV event of the year, the Daytona 500 brings in the ratings. People love this stuff, people want this stuff.

I dont understand why sports is so polarizing. I dont give a damn about Lifetime, MTV, BBC America and others but I dont complain. Even though I subscribe to Showtime, outside of Homeland, Californication and the sports programming, Showtime has become utterly pathetic and a waste of bandwidth since CBS and Viacom split. You dont see me on here crying about how I pay for Showtime and watch it for at most 2 ½ hours a week. People need to learn to shut up and stop crying about this stuff.
--
iPhone: 4” 1136 X 640 Display, 1.30 GHz Dual Core Processor, 1 GB RAM
MyPhone: 5” 1920 X 1080 Display, 1.50 GHz Quad Core Processor, 2 GB RAM
So tell me, why is exactly is the iPhone so great?
Droid Does What Jobs Won’t Let You Do.