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mix

join:2002-03-19
Utica, MI
reply to misiek

Re: External air supply for an 80% AFUE furnace?

Every service tech says this about every furnace...

Inducer motors are easy to change yourself. See if you can find the part online to at least figure out the cost.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by mix:

Every service tech says this about every furnace...

Every single one of us are evil humans. Not a single one of us will ever look at your safety, comfort, or budget. We'll never warn you of possible issues unless we can get maximum money from it. Each and every one of us are just looking for your wallet, nothing more. Every one of us does this every day with every customer and every heating system. It's how we roll.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
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They learned all their evil conniving tactics from electricians and plumbers.

I am curious about the subject though. Would an ERV make any difference in an old drafty house. E.G., would the "least path of resistance" rule apply to air as well?

In my house I have the furnace, water heater, bath vents, and dryer. I'm sure they are pumping copious amounts of air out of the house, which means air is coming in from somewhere anyway.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
Reviews:
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said by nunya:

Would an ERV make any difference in an old drafty house. E.G., would the "least path of resistance" rule apply to air as well?

In my house I have the furnace, water heater, bath vents, and dryer. I'm sure they are pumping copious amounts of air out of the house, which means air is coming in from somewhere anyway.

We have an old leaky house. I had an energy audit with a blower door test, and was given an ordinal list of improvements to reduce outside air infiltration. We did the top items on the list: Insulating all outside walls, weatherstripping doors better, sealing unused windows. Other items on the list were rebuilding windows to eliminate window weights, and then insulate those cavities, insulating basement walls. The ERV didn't even make the list. So in a loose house, your money is better spent on other stuff.

I also draw air with the bath and range vents, but I am not worried about backdrafting because I have a direct vent water heater and 90+ furnace drawing outside combustion air. Only the gas dryer draws combustion air from inside.

So anyway, after the insulation and weatherstripping, the auditor re-did the blower door test, showed me the reduced infiltration, and gave me my rebate certificate. With that, the state program paid for most of the audit and paid me for part of the improvement cost.
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Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

They learned all their evil conniving tactics from electricians and plumbers.

I am curious about the subject though. Would an ERV make any difference in an old drafty house. E.G., would the "least path of resistance" rule apply to air as well?

In my house I have the furnace, water heater, bath vents, and dryer. I'm sure they are pumping copious amounts of air out of the house, which means air is coming in from somewhere anyway.

An HRV/ERV takes in approximately the same amount of air as it exhausts. On the better units you can adjust the intake to exhaust ratio. But overall you are not bringing in a substantial amount of extra air for combustion. And the more you bring in compared to exhausting, you are lowering the ERVs efficiency anyway. It's bringing in more cold air compared to less warm air exhausting. So there is far less heat transfer to condition that incoming air.

For example, lets say your ERV brings in 100cfm. It is exchanging that air by also exhausting about 100cfm. This is what they do, create air changes per hour for better air quality. But your standard efficiency furnace is still consuming combustion air and pumping it out the stack. So where is that combustion air coming from? It's not from the ERV, as it is already pumping out what it brings in. Combustion air comes from same places it has always come from. Leaking windows, uninsulated walls, doors, vents, etc.


JustBurnt

@rr.com
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

They learned all their evil conniving tactics from electricians and plumbers.

Can't leave out Roofers