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andrew_241

join:2012-12-30

[Other] Strange device detected on Windows network

Hello!

My Windows 8 computers are detecting a "dlx" phone on my network. The properties page reveals it to be an HTC J Butterfly/Droid DNA, model HTC6435LVW. I don't have this phone, and my wireless network is locked down pretty good, with a long random WPA2 key, and only authorized MAC addressees are allowed to connect. The wireless router (a new Netgear R6300) does not report that anything is connected right now other than my gaming machine, my server (both wired), and my printer (wireless). The phone disappears after about a minute, but a refresh of the Explorer window brings it back.

Any ideas on what is causing this?

Thanks!

LLigetfa

join:2006-05-15
Fort Frances, ON
kudos:1
Maybe it is connected via Bluetooth, not WiFi.

andrew_241

join:2012-12-30
said by LLigetfa:

Maybe it is connected via Bluetooth, not WiFi.

Well, I just disabled the Bluetooth adapter on my gaming machine (with an Asus P9X79 Deluxe motherboard), as well as the second Ethernet and WiFi adapters, but the device still appears. I am in an apartment, where this can be expected to happen on unsecured networks, but as I mentioned, I think I've locked down my wireless LAN pretty well.


billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5
reply to andrew_241
I see this occasionally on the Windows network on my Win7 laptop. It will show the neighbors wireless printer. Not because it is part of my network, but because it is out there broadcasting it's availability.

HELLFIRE
Premium
join:2009-11-25
kudos:18
reply to andrew_241
This showing up in Network Neighborhood (or whatever Win8 calls it these days?)

May want to follow this thread from the Secuirty forum for some tips and tricks.

Regards


WireHead
I drive to fast
Premium
join:2001-05-09
Muncie, IN

1 recommendation

reply to andrew_241
It could be as simple as this phone with Wifi on is roaming and attempting to get an address from your router. Unless you can use DeviceID or MAC filtering then how is your router to determine if this device can solicit an IP or not? Surely it can attach to the network, get an IP and then failing the Wifi security it just sits there squatting on the IP with no service.

Without a Wifi key you can still attach to wireless networks. You may get no service but not knowing the key does not preclude you from getting an IP to ask for service.

Discover the MAC by either using the router information or attempt to ping it and use ARP to view it. Set the MAC into your deny access table or access list on your router. This will prevent the IP squatting as the router will refuse both service and an the IP to the device.
--
Retired BBR Team Starfire Team Q III Host
Live by chance. Love by choice. Kill by profession.

LLigetfa

join:2006-05-15
Fort Frances, ON
kudos:1
WireHead,
What you say is just plain incorrect. The device cannot get an IP if it cannot satisfy the security requirement.


WireHead
I drive to fast
Premium
join:2001-05-09
Muncie, IN

1 recommendation

reply to andrew_241
Yes I have seen many systems with phones allocating IP addresses and squatting on them but the phones have no key to enable traffic. I do not deny there may be configuration issues but I have seen it a multitude of times while fixing what I am under contract to fix.

Absolutly possible.
--
Retired BBR Team Starfire Team Q III Host
Live by chance. Love by choice. Kill by profession.