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fishacura

join:2008-01-25
Phoenixville, PA

Could this be a FIOS issue?

For the past 24-48 hours or so, my wireless speeds when streaming to my DVD (netflix) are incredibly variable getting down to as low as 1 Mbps.....and as high as 16.

Speednet on the PC looks fine. If the wireless streaming to the home is slow, is that definitely a local issue (my router or setup) or is it possible it could be something on Verizon's end?

Wondering if my router is going or if that's just one possiblity.
--
People who don't get good service on average tell 10 others while people who do get good service on average tell 1.


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Nothing to do with Verizon/FIOS, more than likely new routers being turned on and saturating your wireless spectrum.

»netstumbler.en.softonic.com/

scan and see whats around and possibly find channels with less traffic. As more and more people use wireless, the 3 channels are getting clogged and slowing everyone down


fishacura

join:2008-01-25
Phoenixville, PA
reply to fishacura

Thanks guppy_fish (great nickname). I installed and opened. Don't see anything on how to use it. I'll tinker with it but it looks complicated.

Do you really think new routers in the area could be responsible for this type of degredation? 8-12 Mbps down to less than one?
--
People who don't get good service on average tell 10 others while people who do get good service on average tell 1.


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Absolutely, Wireless for most routers using the 2.4ghz area which while they list 11 channels, only 3 are non overlapping. Most consumer clients ( xbox, phones , older laptops ) only use the 2.4ghz range while higher end, dual radio "N" wireless can use 5ghz, but only if the clients support is as well.

There are apps for smart phones as well, just search the respective stores ( like Google play if you have an Android device ) for wireless network scanner.

I bet you will find many other wireless networks close by, they all will interfere with your network, so pick a channel that not heavily in use


fishacura

join:2008-01-25
Phoenixville, PA

1 edit
reply to fishacura

Well I have the router settings set to "automatic" so should I just pick one of the 11 channels available to me? It states three are "common". Mine was set to automatic but I could easily just pick one of the 11 randomly.

Only other change I have made recently was to move security from WEP to WPA...could that impact speed?

Looking for an app for my phone to check traffic in the area but cannot seem to find a good one.


rebus9

join:2002-03-26
Tampa Bay
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Bright House

See if your wi-fi access point (WAP) has a site survey feature, which shows other WAPs broadcasting in the area. Some do, especially if using some form of DD-WRT firmware.

Yes, it's entirely possible that other nearby WAPs on the same or adjacent channel could be interfering with your signal. There are 11 unlicensed channels for B/G/N but only 3 of them do not overlap-- 1, 6, and 11. Overlap means that channel 2 & 3 (for example) overlap channel 1 to some extent. And so on.

I support a few business locations with horrible wi-fi congestion. There are easily 20-30 other access points on the site survey, many of them fairly strong signals, most of them on 1, 6, & 11. It's difficult to get a stable connection unless you're very near a WAP because of all the "noise" from other stations, even when I narrow the access point down to thin 10 MHz channel width and use the intermediate channels like 3, 4, 8, and 9.

Our solution was to saturate the space with WAPs, all on the intermediate channels, position units on the same channels as far away from each other as possible-- and most importantly, turn DOWN the output power so our own WAPs didn't interfere with each other. Now we can walk from room to room in the building and always have at least 1, sometimes 2 or 3, signals on different channels. Using the same SSID, wi-fi devices automatically associate to the strongest signal. To the users it appears like one giant hotspot, when in reality it's a mesh of many separate hotspots using the same SSID on different channels.



buckingham
Buckingham Pa
Premium
join:2005-07-17
Buckingham, PA
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to fishacura

Honestly, I've had similar issues with using wireless for streaming to our BlueRay player and just opted to convert to a wired connection. "Losing" a movie mid-stream can be very frustrating! I did the same for the new "Smart" TV in our MBR. I fortunately had things wired in a way that I had a drop at both locations...something that's a little more challenging for some folks.