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randun5
Premium
join:2005-10-08
Hillsborough, NC
reply to Fleeced

Re: [TWC] User Guide/Manual

Why would you allow TWC to give you a crap modem? Accept ONLY Motorola 6141. NEVER accept a junk modem that has supposedly router, family controls, etc. Use YOUR ROUTER. Accept only a MODEM without other junk included.

said by Fleeced:

Or you can have it bridged so none of the "junk" is present. Lots of people on here do that and don't have an issue.

Let me first address Mele20’s comments.

Why do you feel that the Ubee is a “crap” modem? I’m in the Raleigh-Durham area of NC & the Motorola 6141 is not an option for me; only the Ubee or an Arris.

What “JUNK” are you referring to? I had a Cisco Valet M20 router, whose signal wasn’t performing well in my home. I had thought about upgrading to another router of my own, but of course, TWC is not going to be responsible for servicing it. In addition, I had a problem awhile back with a different TWC modem & my own router & they tried to blame the issue on my router.

Bottom line for me is if the TWC equipment performs the way I expect it to, I’d rather leave well enough alone.

Now to Fleeced’s comment about bridging so that none of the “junk” is present. I’m presuming that you are referring to bridge the TWC modem with a router of my own if I chose to go that route, correct? If not, why would I want to bridge my LAN & local network at this point?

My understanding of bridging is that by creating one between an Internet connection and a network connection creates an unprotected link between my network and the Internet, which makes my network accessible to anyone on the Internet. True?

Fleeced

join:2012-10-06
kudos:2
"Bridging" in this form simply means turning off TWC's router functionality and using your own. At that point your router would handle all the firewall issues, so unless it was turned off, you would still have that protection.

The NAT funtionality on the all in ones (Not just TWC's) is poor at best. If you only have a few devices it works fine, but if you start loading up a bunch of devices, I've heard reports of the all in one routers locking up or rebooting or other strange things because the router can't handle that load, whereas third party routers have no problems. That way all of your protection/routing is handled on your side and you can make changes easier, rather than calling in to have stuff changed (if they'll even support some of it).

randun5
Premium
join:2005-10-08
Hillsborough, NC
said by Fleeced:

"Bridging" in this form simply means turning off TWC's router functionality and using your own. At that point your router would handle all the firewall issues, so unless it was turned off, you would still have that protection.

The NAT funtionality on the all in ones (Not just TWC's) is poor at best. If you only have a few devices it works fine, but if you start loading up a bunch of devices, I've heard reports of the all in one routers locking up or rebooting or other strange things because the router can't handle that load, whereas third party routers have no problems. That way all of your protection/routing is handled on your side and you can make changes easier, rather than calling in to have stuff changed (if they'll even support some of it).

We're on the same page re bridging. Just so happens that I lost my network today so having my own router would have come in handy!

I currently have only 5 devices on my network & I don't see it growing by no more than possibly 1 more device. That said, based on what happened today, I may be second-thinking getting my own upgraded router.