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leo

@as13285.net

Joining two telephone wires

Original from telephone socket black green white to extension wire
yellow red black green

Please can you advise correct connections

Thanks


twizlar
I dont think so.
Premium
join:2003-12-24
Brantford, ON
kudos:3
Telephone wires don't have 3 wires, they have pairs of colors. It doesn't matter what colors you use as long as they match. Perhaps if you post a little more information.
--
Broadline Networks Inc.


EdT

join:2009-06-12
Saint-Laurent, QC
reply to leo
There should only be 2 pair of wires from the DEMARC, there should not be a white one: green/red and black/yellow. You only need the green/red pair if you only have one phone line with the your DSL service !


NytOwl

join:2012-09-27
canada
reply to leo
While the classic theme for telephone cabling is red/green ("Christmas Tree") for Line 1 and black/yellow ("Bumble Bee") for Line 2, newer buildings/homes tend to follow the networking standard for phone cabling, where Line 1 uses blue/white-blue and Line 2 uses white-orange/orange, respectively.

See this handy-dandy chart on Wikipedia for more details.

DreaMagine

join:2011-09-29
Waterloo, ON
reply to leo
You will want to buy a pack of these to splice the telephone wires:

UR-3 Connector Red 3-Wire IDC Splice 100 Pack @ Amazon

It has three wire connections which allows you to branch off another line from an existing line.
If you just want to join two lines together, you can buy the 2-wire version of the same type of connector.

MrMazda86

join:2013-01-29
Kitchener, ON
reply to leo
The following should help eliminate any confusion you may have...

Original Telephone Wiring


* This should be the kind of wiring that comes into your home.

Original Telephone Wiring to CAT3


* This is most likely the wiring conversion you'll be looking at.

Original Telephone Wiring to CAT5


* This has become the most common "standard" lately, mainly because it allows for maximum expansion.

I hope this should answer your question on how to connect the wiring properly.

mlord

join:2006-11-05
Nepean, ON
kudos:13
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to twizlar
said by twizlar:

Telephone wires don't have 3 wires

In older homes, they do. The third wire is a ground.

MrMazda86

join:2013-01-29
Kitchener, ON
said by mlord:

said by twizlar:

Telephone wires don't have 3 wires

In older homes, they do. The third wire is a ground.

Yes... On older homes, the yellow wire is used as a grounding wire in one of two ways. It will either serve as a grounding point to each of the jack points (as was the case with the reeeeeeally old homes), or more likely, red and green will carry the actual telephone line into the house, while yellow will act as ground to the middle post attachment on the master split box at the original demarcation point inside the house. Since these days however, telco carriers have relocated the "demarcation" point to a central point located in a box, usually on the side of the house. On a one-line system, the phone line will be carried from a larger bunch of wires (more pairs in the bunch) and spliced on the poles to red and green, which carry the signal from the side of the house, down to the main split point within the house. In even more modern installations, this "inner split" will actually consist of a single "demarcation" jack inside the house.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·WIND Mobile
reply to leo
White Black Green sounds like a "found wire" ... probably bell wire or thermostat wire. The only way to know the correct way is to identify which conductor goes to which pin on the socket. On an RJ11 socket, probably only the middle pins are used ... which are red and green in typical wiring. Now with additional accessories, which is red and which is green MAY matter, but for most applications it doesn't matter if red and green get interchanged along the way.


Inssomniak
The Glitch
Premium
join:2005-04-06
Cayuga, ON
kudos:2
reply to mlord
said by mlord:

said by twizlar:

Telephone wires don't have 3 wires

In older homes, they do. The third wire is a ground.

True, but it wasn't black green white.
--
OptionsDSL Wireless Internet
»www.optionsdsl.ca


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·WIND Mobile
reply to leo
Black green and white, if stranded, was a power cable. If solid a bell wire or thermostat wire. Not a phone standard. So the only way to deal with it is find which two conductors are connecting to the R/G terminals of the phone socket existing. If an RJ-11 the R/G terminals are the ones connecting to the two middle pins. If it is a 4 pin plug the size of a power plug, then the two wider apart pins are R and G.

MrMazda86

join:2013-01-29
Kitchener, ON

3 edits
reply to sbrook
said by sbrook:

White Black Green sounds like a "found wire" ... probably bell wire or thermostat wire. The only way to know the correct way is to identify which conductor goes to which pin on the socket. On an RJ11 socket, probably only the middle pins are used ... which are red and green in typical wiring. Now with additional accessories, which is red and which is green MAY matter, but for most applications it doesn't matter if red and green get interchanged along the way.

White/Black/Green does indeed sound like you have yourself a problem. Here's another tip you may find useful. White/Blcak/Green is a standard 120V AC residential wiring code. Black is ALWAYS "Hot". White is ALWAYS "neutral" or "return". Green or bare copper is ALWAYS "ground". On a 3-pole wiring, such as the wiring to an electrical socket where one side is always on and the other side is on a switch, you will have a fourth wire (Red). Red is ALWAYS "Hot", and is usually the one in the bunch to be fed from the switch, however there is nothing in the code that says that red must be the switch. In some cases, an electrician may choose to use Red as the always on, while using Black as the switched hot wire, or even have both black and red as live hot wires that are always on. Black and Red being hot wires that are always on is most commonly found in 240V AC circuits, which are nothing more than 2x 120V AC circuits bridged together with a common return wire. On a telephone wiring standards, the "ring" is ALWAYS "Hot", the "tip" is ALWAYS "neutral" or "return", and the 2nd Line "ring" is ALWAYS GROUND.

This means:

RED --> BLACK

GREEN --> WHITE

YELLOW --> GREEN

BLACK --> *NOTHING*

Hope this helps.

(EDIT: I forgot to mention one thing... This is assuming that the logic of the A/C wiring was used as a means of conforming to code. Depending on the age of your home, this may not be the case, however this is the wiring code.)

(EDIT: Added electrical coding for Black/White/Red/Green AC wiring)