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batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

Warranty on used vehicle...

I know you can't tell me specifics, but I'm looking for some general info, regarding getting a vehicle serviced, after I've purchased a Premium warranty when I purchased a used vehicle at a dealership. I'm asking, because every time I call the dealership, I get transferred to this guys voicemail, who doesn't call me back...

I purchased a premium warranty that covers 5yr / 60,000mi, and is about the same as a new car warranty, according to the brochure. I purchased a Jeep Grand Cherokee from a Ford dealership. Question: When I need service, is this Ford dealership the ONLY entity that will honor the warranty, or can I go to a Chrysler dealership for service? Who here has had experience with a warranty on a used car?

Specifically, one of the valve stems on the wheels is broken / corroded, and I can't fit a tool on it, to pump up the tire, or manage the tire pressure. Replacement involves taking the wheel off the car & dismounting the tire to replace the entire air-pressure sensor. I'd obviously like this done under warranty.

Now I'm stuck thinking about the Ford dealership's ability to service my Jeep -- will they ever have the right part in stock, or will it always be, "we need to keep your car overnite, so the part can get here..."



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

You need to look at the warranty brochure and contact the company that holds the policy. My guess is that there are a wide range of places you can take it to and be covered.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to batsona

said by batsona:

I purchased a premium warranty that covers 5yr / 60,000mi, and is about the same as a new car warranty, according to the brochure. I purchased a Jeep Grand Cherokee from a Ford dealership. Question: When I need service, is this Ford dealership the ONLY entity that will honor the warranty, or can I go to a Chrysler dealership for service? Who here has had experience with a warranty on a used car?

A lot depends on who the service plan is through. Some are through the dealership itself and some are aftermarket that the dealership just sells keeping a portion of the sold value. As Ropeguru said above, you'll have to check your documentation. My guess is that it's aftermarket company and you can go to certain repair shops or any repair shop for vehicles other than the dealership's brand.

Also, you don't have an extended warranty. You have an extended service contract. There are legal differences between the two.

Specifically, one of the valve stems on the wheels is broken / corroded, and I can't fit a tool on it, to pump up the tire, or manage the tire pressure. Replacement involves taking the wheel off the car & dismounting the tire to replace the entire air-pressure sensor. I'd obviously like this done under warranty.

Any tire shop should be able to replace the valve stem for $10-25. If it's more than that go somewhere else. You'll also need to check to see if such repair is even covered by the service plan. Tires/wheels often are not covered by the service plan. Damage not caused by a manufacturing defect may not either. If it is covered, also check to make sure you don't have a deductible that is more than what the service would just cost straight up.


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to batsona

If I were in your shoes:

1st gather up all paperwork surrounding the sale and purchase, especially the warranty. What is covered, how to make claims, where to take the vehicle for coverage/repairs and more will be covered in that document/s.

My story and only exposure to an Aftermarket Warranty, was when my wife bought a Dodge Stratus from a Dodge Dealer while I was out of town. Car was past in miles and months as to Manufacture's Warranty. She paid just shy of $2000.00 for it, cannot recall the length or mileage.

We had quite a bit of trouble and kept the vehicle for less than a year, till she traded it in on a new Hyundai. New Transmission, new exhaust, new rack and pinion, cooling, a.c. stuff, and a bunch more. Repair costs, I think were in excess of $5,000.00. She always took it back to the selling Dodge Dealer and there was a $50.00 deductible each incident. The Aftermarket Warranty they had sold her, also provided Rental and towing. In that year we picked up many upgrades and free rentals with Enterprise.

When the Dodge was sold, I finally read the Contract and learned that it was not transferable, but the unused portion could be cashed in. Its been 9 years, but I think we got a refund check around $1100.00. One of the few times, that I know one of those warranties being worth anything.

So the moral of my story, is to read for yourself what is provided in the Contract and how to get the most out of it. And it is the contract papers that control how the product works.

Good luck.



DeltaElite
We Dont Dial 911

join:2002-03-29
Tucker, GA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to batsona

Go to the dealership sevice department with paperwork in hand and make a BIG LOUD UGLY STINK....if noone in service will help you or can help you go to the slaes floor and get in the used car managers face loud and obnoxiously.

Your car will get fixed.

Your Mantra for this expedition should be "you sold me this F-in car and I need it fixed" and it should be said loudly and often.

--
Protect your right to keep and arm bears!



Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

said by DeltaElite:

Your Mantra for this expedition should be "you sold me this F-in car and I need it fixed" and it should be said loudly and often.

That sounds like a recipe for getting the police called.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.

batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
reply to batsona

OP here: I'm a big fan of accountability... If there's a warranty, please explain it to me, and show me how /who will honor the warranty.



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

1 recommendation

said by batsona:

OP here: I'm a big fan of accountability... If there's a warranty, please explain it to me, and show me how /who will honor the warranty.

That question should have been asked when sitting in the sales office at the dealership by the purchaser at the time of purchase..


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to batsona



It's important for you to take note of what cdru See Profile already noted, which is you *do not* have a warranty, you have an extended service contract. Only an original manufacturer can offer a warranty, and even they don't extend them, they sell service contracts.

That being said, in 99% of all the contracts I dealt with in my Dealership years, the work was able to be performed at any proper repair facility. The dealer would love to convince you that they must do the work, but that isn't the case.

I would take it to the repair facility of your choice, show them the service contract, and see if they will make the needed repairs.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by mattmag:

I would take it to the repair facility of your choice, show them the service contract, and see if they will make the needed repairs.

Or before you go, look at the contract company's website and see if they have service provider or what the procedure is.

batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

OP here... Found out all info.. will post here for others' benefit...

The warranty provider is "Ford". The finance guy at the dealership that sold me the Jeep gave me the 'claim number' for Ford. When a repair shop does a repair, they submit the entire invoice to Ford to get a decision on how much they'll cover. A credit card number is supplied, for the shop to charge the amnt to Ford. I am responsible for a $100 deductible per repair. This way, anyone* can perform the repair, and then be compensated by Ford.
.
.
*I called a highly-recommended, privately-owned repair shop in my city, and they flatly told me they do not do warranty repair, or deal with any warranty companies at all.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by batsona:

The warranty provider is "Ford". The finance guy at the dealership that sold me the Jeep gave me the 'claim number' for Ford. When a repair shop does a repair, they submit the entire invoice to Ford to get a decision on how much they'll cover. A credit card number is supplied, for the shop to charge the amnt to Ford. I am responsible for a $100 deductible per repair. This way, anyone* can perform the repair, and then be compensated by Ford.
.
.
*I called a highly-recommended, privately-owned repair shop in my city, and they flatly told me they do not do warranty repair, or deal with any warranty companies at all.

It's NOT a warranty. He doesn't do warranty work because it's not under a warranty. Even if you substitute service contract for warranty, you said why he doesn't deal with the companies in what you wrote.

The work gets done, then the invoice gets submitted for what the warranty company will pay minus the $100 deductible. The customer only thinks they are going to pay the $100 deductible. What happens when what they warranty company pays + $100 doesn't equal the repair bill? Local parts may be more expensive, local labor rates may be more expensive, additional labor due to an unforeseen but necessary issue. The list goes on.

batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

OP here: Welp, I've got a pamphlet at home that shows what is covered under the Ford Premium ESP; I would hope that Ford will pay for the items that are covered. --otherwise, thats fraud. Sorry if I keep calling it a warranty -- it's technically a service-contract. I did buy the Premium contract, it's the one closest to the way a new-car "warranty" would look at feel. It's the one that covers the most items.



hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to batsona

said by batsona:

OP here... Found out all info.. will post here for others' benefit...
.
*I called a highly-recommended, privately-owned repair shop in my city, and they flatly told me they do not do warranty repair, or deal with any warranty companies at all.

Think it is safe to say that all here realize you purchased a Service Contract. So let's substitute "Warranty" above with "Service Contract".

Reading in other Forums at other sites, many Repair Shops will not work on vehicles and their associated Service Contracts. It is an individual choice they make.


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to batsona



I always accepted jobs covered by *reputable* contract companies. I was aware of who was good, and who was not.

As far as the statement; "they submit the entire invoice to Ford to get a decision on how much they will cover", well, I never went into a repair without FIRST getting authorization. If you don't, chances are good they will deny the claim in its entirety.

I never had a problem getting paid a fair amount for my work. Sometimes you needed to justify amounts or costs, but I was always polite, and established a good rapport with the rep on the phone. If you went at them with both barrels and demanded things, then you may as well have not bothered to call.


batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

Mattmag -- excuse my ignorance --- it sounds like you're speaking from the standpoint of a mechanic? --or are you speaking from the standpoint of a vehicle-owner? Am I supposed to phone the service provider before I walk into a repair shop & tell them what repair I want to have done & see what the coverage is first?

The person I talked to at a Chrysler dealership said that they submit the claim to the service provide after the work has been done, and the bill has been totaled.

Are we also 'kinda' saying that the service provider are aware of the bad repair shops you say, "oh, the bill will be paid by this big faceless company with deep pockets, so I'm going to inflate my rates, so i get more money from them....? (Just like with prescription meds back 20 years ago, before the crackdown?)

I think I'll post a scan of the brochure just so we can all see..



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3

2 recommendations

said by batsona:

Mattmag -- excuse my ignorance --- it sounds like you're speaking from the standpoint of a mechanic? --or are you speaking from the standpoint of a vehicle-owner? Am I supposed to phone the service provider before I walk into a repair shop & tell them what repair I want to have done & see what the coverage is first?

No problem-- I'm speaking as a former shop owner/operator and a dealership service manager for 25+ years.

No, you aren't supposed to do anything beyond taking the vehicle to the shop to report the issue with the car, and make note that you have a service contract. In *all* the cases I ever dealt with, -and I am talking hundreds if not into the thousands,- the shop will perform the needed diagnostic work, which will then determine the cause of the problem and what the required repairs will be.

At this point, the shop needs to prepare a written estimate of the job, including a detailed labor and parts breakdown, and get your authorization to perform the work. Then, the shop calls the service contract provider, and begins the authorization process. This includes confirmation that that the required repair is a covered expense under the terms of the contract. Unfortunately, not all failures are covered, and some providers are downright shitty about what they actually cover. That is what I mean by "knowing who the good companies are".

The repair is explained, and the diagnostic work is also explained, and then the labor amounts and each individual part, fluid and supply is approved at a specified price. The contract providers are fully aware of the actual cost price of all the parts, and either list price is accepted or the mark-up is specified by them. They are also fully aware of book labor times, and any deviation from book time and/or additional parts during the repair must be approved. The shop labor rate must fall within regional norms, and they would on occasion request printed documentation of rates.

After all this has happened, it is then, and *only* then, that the actual repair work starts. Every company I dealt with had a strict policy on this, and if the work was done first without authorization of *both* the customer and the service contract provider, the claim would be flat-out denied, end of story, don't bother asking again. In the case of a "major repair", such as a transmission or engine failure, it was customary for the service contract provider to send out an inspector to visually confirm the failure. Obviously, that was to reduce fraud, but it also was to our benefit in cases where unusual circumstances required extra labor. The inspector could substantiate those requests to the provider.

When the job is completed, the repair order is totaled, and must be signed by the customer. The end cost must match the approved amount, and any deductible is collected from the customer at this time, and the vehicle is released. The service contract provider is then given a copy of the completed repair order, generally via FAX. The provider in most cases would then call back with a credit card number and approval code that we could immediately submit for payment. In a few cases, the providers would mail a check.

Now, this summary is for third-party service contract providers. In the case of manufacturer-supplied contracts, such as the Chrysler Service Contract, Ford ESP and General Motors GMPP, it is a little easier process when handling those contracts from within the issuing manufacturer's dealership. In other words, a GMPP service contract repair done in a Chevy dealership gets processed nearly the same as a regular warranty claim, with the exception that the parts mark-up is calculated at the Retail rate. This is also what the fellow you talked to at the Chrysler dealership was speaking of when he said they do the work first, then submit the repair. But-- and this is a big but-- it must be a Chrysler contract for him to do that. If it is a third-party or other manufacturer (Like your Chrysler with a Ford ESP contract) it has to be pre-approved.

So there you are, a step-by-step rundown from a person who dealt with contracts on nearly a daily basis. I probably left out some smaller details, and if I didn't answer a question, just ask. As you can see, there is no room for "inflating rates so I get more money"; everyone is on a level playing field.

Hope that helps.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to batsona

Well put Matt.


batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage
reply to mattmag

Excellent! This is about what I was told; so I'm glad that you helped prove it is indeed reality. I have an appt on Wed morning to take the Jeep to the Chrysler dealership for the replacement of the tire pressure sensor. The sensor is ~$89 they said, and they may charge up to 1hr of labor, so that's another ~$109. Let's say a total of $200, before tax etc etc....


batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

OP here: Last post, then we're done. I got the Jeep back. Total repair was $160, and Ford ESP paid everything except my $100 deducible of course, and $19 for "shop supplies". So, a $160 repair was knocked down to $119. Everything worked as advertized I guess....



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3



Well that's better than nothing at all. Service contracts, like health insurance, don't always provide much relief on the smaller jobs such as this, but if you have a major repair, you will be feeling quite relieved that you have the added coverage.