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fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to leibold

Re: My addition will take almost 2 miles of Cat 6

said by leibold:

said by alkizmo:

But you'll never see a fridge with RJ45.

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.

Interestingly enough when I worked at Fujitsu in 1999/2000 they had a concept of an e-fridge and I believe they had a working prototype. It had a barcode scanner and a network jack and you would scan stuff as it went in and scanned it when it was empty. That way you kept track of stuff.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to ke4pym

said by ke4pym:

said by fifty nine:

I don't like using switches. I like everything home run. That way upgrading to a newer technology like 10 gig is easy, just replace the main switch and I'm done.

Wish you the best on getting 10G on CAT6.

Technically I have 6A but the way I have it setup I can upgrade the cabling easily and even run fiber if I wanted to.

I doubt I'll be going 10 gig anytime soon but I'm relatively future proof.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

Which fridge?

I really don't remember. I don't think it was as long as 10 years ago but it might have been. The one thing I do clearly remember is the thought that immediately popped into my head: "Oh no, I didn't wire the kitchen!".
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NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06
reply to fifty nine

And it warned you before an item was ready to get up and walk out on its own?
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to TheTechGuru

said by TheTechGuru:

I would also do some CAT3 runs for a wired phone system unless you're going to use IP phones.

with 28 runs of cat6, he certainly can use one for phone either POTS or Voip based....

ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
Reviews:
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reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

said by leibold:

Sorry, but you are wrong on that one. I have already seen that at the local Fry's Electronic store.

10 years ago?
What?
Which fridge?
And what's the point?
My car's on Bluetooth, why aren't the fridges too?

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

»www.samsung.com/us/appliances/re···HARS/XAA


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

Interestingly enough when I worked at Fujitsu in 1999/2000 they had a concept of an e-fridge and I believe they had a working prototype. It had a barcode scanner and a network jack and you would scan stuff as it went in and scanned it when it was empty. That way you kept track of stuff.

LG makes one similar - tied into a grocery service, even, so you can make a shopping list or order stuff straight from the touch screen on the door... I helped install a bunch of them in a high-end condo development a friend of mine worked on.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to ke4pym

said by ke4pym:

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

Those Samsung ones are more recent products. I looked at one of those as well (for curiosity, not with the intend to buy) and based on where the wireless antenna was located was wondering how well it would work. It seemed to me that the stainless steel exterior would block most of the wireless signal ?
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by leibold:

said by ke4pym:

Doesn't have an RJ45 jack. But does have WiFi -

Those Samsung ones are more recent products. I looked at one of those as well (for curiosity, not with the intend to buy) and based on where the wireless antenna was located was wondering how well it would work. It seemed to me that the stainless steel exterior would block most of the wireless signal ?

My original point exactly: WiFi is now for such appliances. RJ45 was 10-12 years ago when WiFi wasn't very main stream and expensive.

These were just computers in refrigerators. That fad probably came along with TVs in the refrigerator doors. It was a gimmick.

With laptops and tablets, nobody needs a computer in the refridgerator (for the women *wink wink*).

If appliances have internet hook up these days, it would only be for monitoring/remote control, which requires very little bandwidth and wifi would be most practical.

As for where the antenna is located, could be anywhere, maybe along the edge where there's a rubber pad protecting a corner so the stainless panels don't interfere.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

The antenna on the model I looked at was deep inside the door behind ice/water dispenser. It seemed to allow for only a narrow angle of exposure (towards the front of the refrigerator).

That might be fine if the fridge is installed along an exterior house wall since then the fridge front would face into the house. The only way that it would work if the fridge is installed along an interior wall is if you can pick up your neighbors wifi

It will be interesting to see what form of wireless home automation will ultimately prevail. There is nothing to prevent using wifi but Zigbee seems currently leading actual product availability (limited as it is). Bluetooth (as already mentioned) is being considered for this purpose as well.

The Internet fridge (depending on how it is being used) might be more bandwidth intensive (and hence wifi the more logical choice) then typical home automation tasks (sensors and controls).
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NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge

Why does that just sound so... cool?
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"

ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
Reviews:
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said by NotTheMama:

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge

Why does that just sound so... cool?

It really isn't. I'm a Samsung whore, I'll admit it. But their "internet-fridge" sucks. The layout of the shelves is poor. Perhaps if you lived alone and never made a turkey dinner, it'd be a fine fridge. But if you have a family or even another person living with you, it really isn't the fridge to have.


NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06

...wasn't really referring to any specific fridge--just the term "Internet fridge" (in all its varied meanings of "coolness")
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to leibold

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge (depending on how it is being used) might be more bandwidth intensive (and hence wifi the more logical choice) then typical home automation tasks (sensors and controls).

Yeah but we're talking about 1kb vs 50kb (depending on the level of useless junk is sent in between). Yet we're bashing WiFi because it can only do 8mbps in heavy traffic areas vs 1gbps wired. That 8mbps is gargantuous for any remote automation products.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
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The "high bandwidth" example I was thinking off was the case of watching a cooking show and following along in your own kitchen (or even just using it as a TV in general to follow that "must watch immediately" show while preparing a meal).
You might want a bit more then 50kbps for that but 1Mbps would certainly be enough for a quality video stream that lets you read the ingredients list clearly.

Not much bandwidth is needed for maintaining a fridge inventory even if you add online shopping to refill it.
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leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to NotTheMama

said by NotTheMama:

Why does that just sound so... cool?

If you had seen the crowd of geeks surrounding it, you would have thought it was a hot item
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to leibold

said by leibold:

The "high bandwidth" example I was thinking off was the case of watching a cooking show and following along in your own kitchen (or even just using it as a TV in general to follow that "must watch immediately" show while preparing a meal).

oh that...

well who knows if its heading that way, but I doubt it considering the trend is that everyone has a tablet (which can do a better job).


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
Reviews:
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reply to NotTheMama

said by NotTheMama:

said by leibold:

The Internet fridge

Why does that just sound so... cool?

Only if it has Youtube and Netflix.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by Cho Baka:

Only if it has Youtube and Netflix.

Yet the idea of staring at a fridge door seems.... deranged.
Is the person staring because he's having a diet dillema?
Or is he possessed like that girl in Paranormal Activity?


jeffmoss26

join:2002-07-22
Beachwood, OH

2 recommendations

reply to pandora


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

said by jeffmoss26:


do 1 also for the 12 drops of coax...lol


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to pandora

The "X ALL THE THINGS" meme is most applicable: USE ALL THE CABLES!

Or a mix:

I don't always run wiring, but when I do, I use ALL OF IT!



jig

join:2001-01-05
Hacienda Heights, CA
reply to pandora

28 drops per "bedroom" sounds more like a pay webcam site than a family home.

one plus for not having a network switch in each room - no need to have it on battery backup if you want the network to work during a power outage. yes, you can just have your WAPs on battery backup and be fine...

anyway. a downside of such a system is that you can end up with electrical ground biases that somehow couple into the cat6 and end up blowing your $1k switch every time a circuit breaker pops or the grid goes down. switches in each room can sometimes act as a surge protector, where a lot of consumer appliances aren't as electrically safe.

me... i'd design the rooms so that there was a natural placement for a desk and entertainment devices, and maybe run 4 separate cat 6 lines and two separate rg6 lines conforming to the natural layout. even that might be overkill for a bedroom... media room maybe would have a few extra cat 6 and HDMI lines run for a projector mounted to the ceiling.

i can't think of any safety reasons against running 28 cat6 lines to each bedroom... but i wonder if there's a fire hazard somewhere. i believe the shielding, to be code, has to be something that doesn't melt off or something. anyone know of a code section the OPs setup might run afoul of in a residence? do they need to be run in a conduit somehow?
--
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pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
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Only active Cat 6 cable will be energized and connected to a switch. The goal is to be able to relocate furniture within the room.

I anticipate 5-10 active wired connections per room, but wished to have the ability to move furniture around as desired.

The plan is to expand the LAN with 48 port PoE capable Cisco managed LAN switches as needed. Initially two 48 port switches will be installed with room for up to 6 in the main network rack.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

said by pandora:

The goal is to be able to relocate furniture within the room.

with 7 outlets of cat6 and rg6..how many furniture relocation are you expecting to do in say 5-10 years?

that's also a lot of outlets to cover up with furniture so it won't be unsightly...

planning is about putting in the right amount of cables and then some but not overkilling it to the max...

ImpetusEra
Premium
join:2004-05-19
00000
reply to pandora

said by pandora:

Only active Cat 6 cable will be energized and connected to a switch. The goal is to be able to relocate furniture within the room.

I anticipate 5-10 active wired connections per room, but wished to have the ability to move furniture around as desired.

The plan is to expand the LAN with 48 port PoE capable Cisco managed LAN switches as needed. Initially two 48 port switches will be installed with room for up to 6 in the main network rack.

How big are these rooms that they need that many drops? I would think 6 RG6 and 12 CAT6 per room would be a more reasonable number. For switching maybe a modular chassis would be better suited. Cisco or HP Procurve, populate chassis as needed.

pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
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reply to medbuyer

said by medbuyer:

with 7 outlets of cat6 and rg6..how many furniture relocation are you expecting to do in say 5-10 years?

The question is more what will be the useful life of gigabit Ethernet cables in a home. If these cables become useless over time, it's easy to remove the outlet and patch the wall.

The intention is to not have Ethernet outlets define the furniture layout. I don't view Ethernet outlets are more or less unsightly than any other outlet or switch.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by pandora:

The question is more what will be the useful life of gigabit Ethernet cables in a home. If these cables become useless over time, it's easy to remove the outlet and patch the wall.

The intention is to not have Ethernet outlets define the furniture layout. I don't view Ethernet outlets are more or less unsightly than any other outlet or switch.

useful life? when my house was built back in 06 and we closed in early 07, my planned ethernet wiring worked so much in my favor such that i didnt need to add / remove or have unsightly outlets to cover with furniture or consider it in mind when moving furniture..and I expect to have the wiring good for another 5-10 years at least...

it's not about what the cable can handle bandwidth wise, it's the amount of cables that's having everybody scratching their heads for you...that's like 2 outlets on 3 walls and 1 on the 4th on a square or whatever shape room...really insane...

EDIT: the op did say there were only 4 outlets in a room with 7 runs of cat6 per outlet...my bad...

i spent money where I planned it to be and expect to spend a little bit if I needed more of what I expected or planned...

i understand your intention about the ethernet outlets not defining the furniture layout but what you did may have well contradicted your intention and you didn't know it...

but then again, you're the guy who does everything in overdrive mode...400amp on a residential setting...

»The renovation continues ... today new 400 amp service!


jeffmoss26

join:2002-07-22
Beachwood, OH
reply to pandora



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to pandora

LOL! (@jeffmoss26)

Ok. I just overheard one dept guy needing to order 100K ft of Cat5e and another 200K feet of hidensity bundle (2 Cat5e, 2 Cat5 phone, multimode fiber 50micron and all wrapped around a RG6Quad).

2 miles is nothing...
--
Splat