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jmn1207
Premium
join:2000-07-19
Ashburn, VA
kudos:1

What Accounts for the Higher Score?

How is Google Fiber scoring so much higher? Clearly this is some artificial limit being imposed somewhere in the path. Why wouldn't every ISP be able to easily manage a measly 2.57 Mbps download stream?

Where is the bottleneck? I've seen at certain times that heavy usage probably accounts for my Netflix streams over my wired Roku device dropping out of HD on occasion with Comcast 50/10 service. It rarely, if ever, did so with my FiOS 35/35 service. When Netflix is acting up, my connection is otherwise working as expected to other sites and services.

Is this an issue with peering, encoding, or some other problem? It seems like there would be a LOT more Comcast customers using Netflix than there could be with FiOS, if only because of the vast difference in the total number of subscribers. Perhaps there is a finite limit on the total allowable bandwidth available to Netflix streams at some point along the route?

Anyone have a reasonable explanation?



88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

said by jmn1207:

How is Google Fiber scoring so much higher? Clearly this is some artificial limit being imposed somewhere in the path. Why wouldn't every ISP be able to easily manage a measly 2.57 Mbps download stream?

Actually Netflix can do as high as 5400 kbps.


jmn1207
Premium
join:2000-07-19
Ashburn, VA
kudos:1

1 edit

1 recommendation

Has Netflix done anything to make sure the test results are not skewed by the type of content being streamed? A lot of their content is not available in HD, and I doubt these SD programs even approach 2 Mbps in streaming quality. If a bunch of low quality cartoons are being streamed, it might lower the overall results when compared to a higher quality HD action movie.

Clearly the overall results are nearly identical where subscriber numbers are reasonably equal, or at least above a certain threshold, but Google would have a significantly lower number of subscribers. Perhaps if Google had 100,000 subscribers then they too would be around 2 Mbps along with the rest of the crowd, due mostly to the type of content being streamed, and not necessarily the quality of the connection?

Edit: I'm seeing references to much lower MAXIMUM streaming for HD content.

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netflix

"Streaming
Netflix streams HD content using Microsoft VC1AP encoding at a maximum bitrate of between 2600 kbit/s and 3800 kbit/s (depending on the movie).[200] A lower bitrate feed[201] may be supplied if the user's network connection is not capable of handling the maximum bitrate available for the film in question.
Netflix recommends that people stream its movies over a broadband connection with a speed of at least 1.5 megabits per second (1.5 Mbit/s), and that people use an Internet connection of at least 3 megabits per second to get better-looking video on par with a DVD.[202]
Netflix provides users the ability to choose their download rates / quality of video on their site (»account.netflix.com/VideoQuality)"


rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO
reply to jmn1207

RE: More Comcast customers using NetFlix than FIOS.

Probably but what if more customers choose naked FIOS (no TV) vs. Comcast and choose Netflix to obtain video content.

One thing is for sure, there are so many variables here that it's difficult to understand what these numbers mean. In another post I questioned whether or not the CPE equipment has any impact. Are most using WiFi which can have various interference problems causing speeds to fall back if the transmission error rate gets too high? What about the players? Are they all created equal? Another poster mentioned they use their Bluray player and complained about a lot of buffering problems.


NYGiants

join:2012-08-31
united state
reply to jmn1207

it is megabytes a second not megabits a second, i understand the confusion though

8 megabits = 1 megabyte
Ex: With 24.0 megabits per second you would be able to download 3 megabytes (of video or whatever you want) a second



jmn1207
Premium
join:2000-07-19
Ashburn, VA
kudos:1

Well, Netflix simply uses the acronym "Mbps", and I assumed that they meant megabits per second. The report shows "DEC. AVG SPEED FOR NETFLIX STREAMS (Mbps)". I can't believe they intend for this to mean megabytes per second when pertaining to average streams.

Unless you can find data to support it, I will maintain that this report is showing average megabits per second.


NYGiants

join:2012-08-31
united state

This link explains

»www.abctrick.net/2012/11/megabit···ing.html



jmn1207
Premium
join:2000-07-19
Ashburn, VA
kudos:1

1 edit

I understand megabyte and megabit, this is not new to me. I'm saying that Netflix is using megabits in their report to show the average performance of their streams.

It does not make sense that Sprint, which shows an average of .59 in this month's report, would have an average Netflix stream of nearly 4800 kbps. I'm certain the report is using megabits per second, which would place an average stream at around 600 kbps for Sprint.



NotTheMama
What Would Earl Do?

join:2012-12-06
reply to NYGiants

said by NYGiants:

it is megabytes a second not megabits a second, i understand the confusion though

There's no confusion. Netflix uses "Mbps" (megabits per second) because that's the standard [notation] used for speed of a communications link. I myself average between 2 and 3 mbps with my FiOS connection when streaming from Netflix, so I can assure you--it is not "megabytes a second". (This has been covered a number of times before, here and elsewhere.)
--
"...but ya doesn't hasta call me Johnson!"