dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1143
share rss forum feed


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN

User backup software

What software do you recommend for your users to back up their data?

I know they should back it up to (and/or keep it on) the network, but with 400 users with 30GB+ of "must keep" data that just isn't possible. This doesn't include the workgroup data and the files that they do actually keep out there.

My main issue has been users don't (or won't) have admin rights. On Windows 7 64-bit this seems to cause issues with scheduling backups (as we all know if it isn't scheduled it won't happen).

Looking to see what others are using/recommending.
--
“Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.” ¯ Robert A. Heinlein

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
Active Directory and using GPO's is a very wide spread method of keeping users data backed up, I'm not a Sysadmin, but the AD class I took goes into details of this feature

FYI, 30GB doesn't seem like allot for a user dataset, Thats 12TB which can be done with 4 drives these days? also the backups are incremental mostly ...

tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1
reply to Kilroy
i wouldn't leave that responsibility to the user.

why are you not able to supply them with additional storage space?


ritchanon

@ziggo.nl
reply to Kilroy
By workgroup data do you mean you don't use AD?

If so, why not? 400 users and no AD to manage them is way less than ideal.

If not try looking into roaming profiles and folder redirection and/or homeshares. For instance My Documents get redirected to a fileserver or SAN, that way you can use backup software to backup the fileserver/SAN. And perhaps utilize Shadow Copies so users or your org's servicedesk can restore the users' files

You can expand on that a bit, by for instance using a GPO to hide local drives, so they can only save their stuff to their homeshares or redirected userfolders. If that's not an option try to educate your users by explaining to them that only the stuff they save to the redirected folders gets backupped, otherwise they are on their own...

Off course you need some backing from management to enforce such a policy.

»www.grouppolicy.biz/2010/08/best···ization/

Take note though, this is NOT something you cobble together in a couple off days, but requires some thinking and careful planning.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to guppy_fish
said by guppy_fish:

FYI, 30GB doesn't seem like allot for a user dataset, Thats 12TB which can be done with 4 drives these days?

Four desktop drives, not four server drives, big difference. A quick look over at New Egg shows their SAS drives are a bit more expensive than a desktop drive. Then they have to work in the existing hardware. I'd love to keep them on the network. Just have to find someone to pay for more storage space, yeah, that's easy. As anyone who has ever managed network storage will tell you, "The more space you give to the users the more ways they will find to fill it." Plus when you add more drive space you also have to add more back up capacity. This is a never ending circle.

Let's just say that putting it on the network is not an option. Users must back up to an external USB device as files must be kept on the local drive as users are frequent travelers and need all of their data with them all of the time. However, should their machine be stolen or the drive crash they need to have as much of their data as possible without having to send the drive off for data recovery.
--
“Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.” ¯ Robert A. Heinlein

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1
reply to Kilroy
God, and here I thought I was in the midst of a chickenshit operation. Thanks for making me feel better, OP.

By the way, 8 or 12 of these bad boys in a nice hardware-RAID driven RAID 10 would do the job.

»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···tb%20re4

tomdlgns
Premium
join:2003-03-21
Chicago, IL
kudos:1
reply to Kilroy
how about MS Synctoy?

»www.microsoft.com/en-us/download···id=15155

run it as a scheduled task (not sure how it works if the user is logged out never had to mess with it in that scenario)

probably not the best option, but it is a start.


exocet_cm
Free at last, free at last
Premium
join:2003-03-23
New Orleans, LA
kudos:3
reply to Kilroy
said by Kilroy:

said by guppy_fish:

FYI, 30GB doesn't seem like allot for a user dataset, Thats 12TB which can be done with 4 drives these days?

Let's just say that putting it on the network is not an option. Users must back up to an external USB device as files must be kept on the local drive as users are frequent travelers and need all of their data with them all of the time. However, should their machine be stolen or the drive crash they need to have as much of their data as possible without having to send the drive off for data recovery.

First:
Does it have to be SAS?
Why not build a small storage server using enterprise-class SATA drives?
Can you buy a Dell or similar brand NAS on eBay? I did recently for my house (they aren't that expensive depending on what you buy).

Second:
Enable offline files.
Push out a GPO to redirect files and folders to the NAS.
Configure your GPO to not redirect the music and videos folder of your users.
Or you could configure Windows Backup to redirect all of the workstations to a network storage location and do it that way.
El-cheapo "backup" solution.

The cheapest I've done it: 8 total (2 arrays) of 4x 1TB Western Digital Caviar Blacks in RAID 10 (mirrored-striped, desktop-class drives don't like RAID 5, 6, etc, since the on/off TLER option was removed from user changes but mirrored plays nice) installed in two PowerEdge T310 servers.
Configured GPO as above (redirect files and folders except music and video). Enabled offline files.
Configured DFS between server 01 and server 02 using the two arrays of RAID 10 and pointed users to the DFS \\mydomain.com\DFS01\user files\(user name)\my documents\
Has been working for 5 years now.
--
"All newspaper editorial writers ever do is come down from the hills after the battle is over and shoot the wounded." - Bruce Anderson

"I have often regretted my speech, never my silence." - Xenocrates


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
I'm not in charge of server drive space. Suffice it to say, storing it on the network is NOT an option as it is outside of my control and would take an act of god to get changed. You know feasibility study, determine the cost using the company standards and so on. Getting things done in a larger company is at times more challenging as you don't have to just sell the cost, you have to work with the 20 other groups that are involved, server operations, network storage group, backup group, data retention group, enterprise server standards, and so on. Without fail when dealing with that many groups you'll come up with more than a couple of people who are against your plan for one reason or another.

A good part of the issue is that I work at a company that has merged with other companies, merged locations, and had people who didn't understand how things should be set up on network shares and didn't teach users how to use network shares properly. In reality the whole thing needs to be blown away and recreated properly. However, in the real world that's not going to happen.

I'm sure other people who have networks that have been around since the 90s have similar issues. They were set up by people who knew the basics, but there were no standards so they made it up as they went along. Eventually they found what worked best, but fitting 20 years of bad data management into that mold just can't happen.

A huge part of the issue could be resolved if users just cleaned up the space they have already used. Do we really need pictures from the 2005 kids at work day on the network?
--
“Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.” ¯ Robert A. Heinlein

royhandy

join:2012-11-05
USA
reply to Kilroy
Sounds like hard work to convince all those groups that backing up their data is a good idea. Better get crackin'!


Badger3k
We Don't Need No Stinkin Badgers
Premium
join:2001-09-27
Franklin, OH
reply to Kilroy
You are kinda in a catch 22. If you put in some solution to backup the machines you still need storage. Even if that means buying 2TB external drives for all your users. Granted that might be an easier approval for you than additional server storage.

Best option as others have said is to redirect it to a server and enable Offline files for those that travel/need it. Besides that, you could look at something like Acronis or something else along those lines.

For those that travel a lot, I'd probably look at setting up Crashplan/Mozy/Carbonite/etc. With something like Crashplan you can have it backup locally as well to the Cloud.
--
Team Discovery: Project Hope