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TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to stevey_frac

Re: Netflix Super HD/Open Connect

I was finally about to consider getting a Netflix subscription.

However.... I'm not spending money on getting Windows 8 so I can get full functionality ("Super HD") from Netflix. Screw that.

If you can make a Windows 8 "app", then why can't you also make a Windows program that works on earlier versions of Windows? Is it really that difficult?

Sorry Netflix, you've lost a potential subscriber.



Amandapanda

@184.151.190.x

Get AppleTV


stevey_frac

join:2009-12-09
Cambridge, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to El Quintron

So, Super HD through UnoTelly is a bust during peak hours.

Right now, i'm struggling to pull the 3 mbit video profile through them.

However, using Tek's DNS, I can immediately buffer up a Super HD stream, albeit only with Canadian selection.

--Steve


34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

Unless it's changed since their announcement in 2010, Netflix uses Dolby Digital Plus (E-AC-3) for 5.1 and 7.1 audio. Dolby Digital Plus is not backwards compatible with Dolby Digital (AC-3). The Boxee does not list support for DD+, and it's unlikely to have enough processing power to decode such things in software like the PS3 could (the PS3's CPU is very slow for general-purpose stuff by today's standards, but it's still pretty fast at raw math stuff).

The Boxee Box supports AC3, E-AC3, Dolby TrueHD, DTS, and DTS-HD.

eeeaddict

join:2010-02-14
reply to El Quintron

is there differece between this and bluray? because the regular hd streams seem like a blueray rip at 6mbps so would I be right its still just a bluray rip but at a higher bitrate?


stevey_frac

join:2009-12-09
Cambridge, ON

The difference it's bitrate.

5.8 mbit vs 20 mbit.

Bluray is quite a bit higher quality.

-Steve



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to 34764170

said by 34764170:

The Boxee Box supports AC3, E-AC3, Dolby TrueHD, DTS, and DTS-HD.

That list does not match the one on Boxee's official website. You list two codecs which are not on Boxee's official list, and are missing multiple ones that are:

»support.boxee.tv/entries/2070108···-formats
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
join:2008-04-28
Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL

said by Guspaz:

said by 34764170:

The Boxee Box supports AC3, E-AC3, Dolby TrueHD, DTS, and DTS-HD.

That list does not match the one on Boxee's official website. You list two codecs which are not on Boxee's official list, and are missing multiple ones that are:

»support.boxee.tv/entries/2070108···-formats

That's intersting, because I can confirm all the codecs he listed play on my boxee. Maybe, in some cases the sound system is decoding it, and it's just being passed through by the HDMI or optical cable?
--
Support Bacteria -- It's the Only Culture Some People Have

bdoyledimou

join:2002-08-20
Markham, ON
reply to El Quintron

Has anyone found any 3-d movies on Netflix yet? or is it "we will do this, but not yet" statement?


EcHoMaN

join:2003-05-04
Toronto, ON

said by bdoyledimou:

Has anyone found any 3-d movies on Netflix yet? or is it "we will do this, but not yet" statement?

The United States selection has about 60 3D movies. The Canadian has one Piranha 3d


milnoc

join:2001-03-05
H3B
kudos:2
reply to El Quintron

Just watched The Fifth Element in Super-HD using a borrowed Sony Google TV appliance.

Wow.

While it may not be absolutely perfect (sub-SD quality for the first 15 to 30 seconds), I can definitely see casual viewers with modest to moderate set-ups ditch both their cable subscription and their Blu-Ray player for this.
--
Watch my future television channel's public test broadcast!
»thecanadianpublic.com/live


EcHoMaN

join:2003-05-04
Toronto, ON

said by milnoc:

Just watched The Fifth Element in Super-HD using a borrowed Sony Google TV appliance.

Wow.

While it may not be absolutely perfect (sub-SD quality for the first 15 to 30 seconds), I can definitely see casual viewers with modest to moderate set-ups ditch both their cable subscription and their Blu-Ray player for this.

There's not a whole lot on standard TV anyways besides a worrying amount of reality TV shows which are junk. Half of the other stuff can be seen and streamed from the broadcasters own website, at least in Canada where all you need to do is wait 24 hours after it airs for them to upload onto their site. I still don't understand why anyone pays 100$+ for a subscription to TV services. Most sports now have an app and you can subscribe to them for alot less than paying cable+packages.


milnoc

join:2001-03-05
H3B
kudos:2

Careful. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe TSN allows you to watch their live sports broadcasts online only if you're already a TSN cable/sat subscriber.
--
Watch my future television channel's public test broadcast!
»thecanadianpublic.com/live


mdrejhon

join:2004-02-02
Toronto, ON

1 edit
reply to milnoc

said by milnoc:

While it may not be absolutely perfect (sub-SD quality for the first 15 to 30 seconds), I can definitely see casual viewers with modest to moderate set-ups ditch both their cable subscription and their Blu-Ray player for this.

On both TekSavvy's and Bell's 25Mbps VDSL service using an AppleTV gen3, connected via an Ethernet cable instead of WiFi, it plays in "SuperHD" H.264 immediately from the first second (top bitrate), after just 4-5 seconds of buffering. No low-quality rampup, no long bufferings.

It is not fully Blu-Ray quality, but on non-congested 25Mbps XDSL connections, the Netflix "SuperHD" is now far better picture quality than both Rogers Cable HDTV and Bell FibeTV.

The encodes are starting to get "pretty impressive for the measly bitrates they push out". A movie "Hugo" I watched, I saw no compression artifacts at all, and I can tell apart 720p vs 1080p. Certainly far beyond YouTube quality. They are using a highly efficient encoder, and are getting direct encodes from studio masters for certain movies (I believe "Hugo" is one of them). Although a 20Mbps Blu-Ray from a similiar encoder is superior, a highly efficient 5.8Mbps good multi-pass encode (Netflix seems to be throwing almost a supercomputer to encode 'certain' SuperHD movies) and they seem to be able to do it sometimes more direct from masters.

Although H.264 is only twice as efficient as MPEG2, it's not the whole picture. Efficient multipass 5.8Mbps H.264 encodes from masters, can look better than a recompresses / single-pass MPEG2 compress transmitted at 3 times bandwidth (e.g. 19 Mbps ATSC over-the-air HDTV broadcasts, at least those transmitted using a single-pass real-time MPEG2 compressor) Lots of TV broadcasters are broadcasting recompresses nowadays "to fit their pipe". It ain't Blu-Ray bitrates, but the "SuperHD" streams are far better looking than many movies on Bell FibeTV or Rogers, on good non-congested 25Mbps connections (zero stall 25Mbps).


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to El Quintron

Netflix runs entirely on Amazon Web Services, and this includes all of their encoding. Not a super computer per-se.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10

said by Guspaz:

Netflix runs entirely on Amazon Web Services, and this includes all of their encoding. Not a super computer per-se.

Yeah.. They did a big article about how they managed to set up better loadbalancing, etc, and released the code as opensource for all AWS users.

»arstechnica.com/information-tech···oftware/
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP

mdrejhon

join:2004-02-02
Toronto, ON

4 edits
reply to Guspaz

I did say "almost a supercomputer".
Google "Amazon supercomputer" -- you can hire as many CPU's as you wish from Amazon and combine it. Technically, it can be a big economic incentive: Netflix can now afford to let a few amazon servers spend a few hours encoding/re-encoding one movie H.264 to try to increase quality as much as possible without reducing bitrate. Maximize quality, minimize bitrate, get more users.

They also have EyeIO tech, which normally used to lower bitrate -- can also be used to improve quality even further while keeping the same bitrate. (e.g. Getting a normally-10Mbps-quality H.264 stream that's apparently only 7Mbps). Google "Netflix EyeIO" and how it makes bitrates 20%-50% smaller while keeping the same quality. And how it can also improve quality while keeping the same bitrate.

I don't know the exact details, but it suffices to say that whatever I'm seeing is quite impressive for 5.8Mbps* rate. I can't even create 1080p this good looking at 5.8Mbps using easily downloaded tools. How Netflix does it, I don't know -- but it's probably a combination of throwing more resources at an encode, getting access to 4K masters to downconvert from, and the EyeIO technology. A combination of the above.
(For movies like "Hugo" and "Transformers 3").

I still prefer Blu-Ray, but what I'm seeing is better picture quality than both Bell FibeTV and Rogers HDTV (I've had both on the same display). Cheaper than purchasing 2 VOD movies a month on cable -- and you can get better picture quality on Netflix. This is the point where I gladly hop on the Netflix bandwagon for the first time, even just for a few movies a month.

*5.8Mbps video + 384Kbps DD5.1 audio (for "7Mbps"+ connections)

Lots of stuff on Netflix is crap though. The non-SuperHD stuff. aka 90% is still crap.



milnoc

join:2001-03-05
H3B
kudos:2

Now you have a choice. Purchase a single Blu-Ray title for $35, or have full access to a video collection for $8/month.

An important note to any major studio who doesn't "play ball" with Netflix. If your customers can't find your material on Netflix where you'll get paid something, they'll find your material on BitTorrent where you get paid NOTHING!
--
Watch my future television channel's public test broadcast!
»thecanadianpublic.com/live


mdrejhon

join:2004-02-02
Toronto, ON

1 recommendation

I still prefer Blu-Ray. I support the mom-and-pop type movie rental still operating in downtown Toronto, one block from Yonge-Wellesley. Good selection of Blu-Rays, newer releases not found on NetFlix.

That said, Netflix video quality now surpassed cable quality (if watching SuperHD streams) -- that's no longer "YouTube quality" of yesterday's Netflix. (But needs a connection-of-massive-safety-margin (like 25Mbps), be on Netflix Open Connect, and a direct wire instead of WiFi)

However, even for non-SuperHD stuff -- it is awfully convenient having access to the entire Futurama catalog before the current year (All shows of all series, and all Futurama full length movies ever made before current year), and even things like FlashForward (a cancelled TV series, that I missed the last few shows of), and other stuff I didn't expect to see on Netflix. Apparently, still even better image quality than cable, just not noticeably (as for SuperHD). And as a deaf guy, Netflix finally got serious about captioning (After being lazy on this for many years), so 90% of the stuff I want to watch is now captioned. Most VOD on Rogers/Bell do not have closed captions, and lots of competing services don't even support subtitles.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to El Quintron

I tried watching an episode of AdventureTime on Illico On Demand (Videotron's VoD platform). The quality was absolutely horrible. It was low res (could have been regular SD), but it used nearest neighbour filtering to scale it up to the output resolution (1080i). So not only was it low res, it was chunky blocky low res. If it had outputted it at the native 480p and let my projector scale it up, or if it had actually used even bilinear filtering for the scale, it would have looked fine...

The entire VoD interface is also laughably badly designed and painfully slow to use. To be honest, I'm surprised anybody uses it at all. Maybe their "illico next gen" platform isn't so bad, but it was unusably bad for me.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



creed3020
Premium
join:2006-04-26
Kitchener, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to milnoc

said by milnoc:

Now you have a choice. Purchase a single Blu-Ray title for $35, or have full access to a video collection for $8/month.

An important note to any major studio who doesn't "play ball" with Netflix. If your customers can't find your material on Netflix where you'll get paid something, they'll find your material on BitTorrent where you get paid NOTHING!

Now that made me laugh!


Tx
bronx cheers from cheap seats
Premium
join:2008-11-19
Mississauga, ON
kudos:12
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·FreePhoneLine
·Rogers Hi-Speed

1 recommendation

said by creed3020:

said by milnoc:

Now you have a choice. Purchase a single Blu-Ray title for $35, or have full access to a video collection for $8/month.

An important note to any major studio who doesn't "play ball" with Netflix. If your customers can't find your material on Netflix where you'll get paid something, they'll find your material on BitTorrent where you get paid NOTHING!

Now that made me laugh!

so true though. Bluray pricing is out of this world. DVD's were sold for $28-35 a decade ago, you'd think prices would drop a little bit.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to El Quintron

Most movies on bluray don't cost that much, at least not in the US. The Avengers on bluray is $25 from amazon.com, $18 new from other sellers through Amazon. Many others are cheaper.

Still a tad overpriced, tbh. At least when they charge $80 for TNG on bluray, you know that it cost them a ton of money on the remaster, and that the blurays are their primary revenue source for it, and that you're getting like 16+ hours of content. But for a movie that has already made a ton of money, the $30 price in Canada for The Avengers is higher than it needs to be.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

The entire VoD interface is also laughably badly designed and painfully slow to use.

I haven't seen an MSO with a decent interface and what's even more annoying is how often their VoD service has errors and fails to play the content.


milnoc

join:2001-03-05
H3B
kudos:2
reply to Guspaz

I used to pay on average between $30 and $50 for Laserdisc titles!


34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

Most movies on bluray don't cost that much, at least not in the US. The Avengers on bluray is $25 from amazon.com, $18 new from other sellers through Amazon. Many others are cheaper.

Still a tad overpriced, tbh. At least when they charge $80 for TNG on bluray, you know that it cost them a ton of money on the remaster, and that the blurays are their primary revenue source for it, and that you're getting like 16+ hours of content. But for a movie that has already made a ton of money, the $30 price in Canada for The Avengers is higher than it needs to be.

All of that stuff is more than a tad bit overpriced.


TOPDAWG
Premium
join:2005-04-27
Midland, ON
kudos:3
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to El Quintron

ok that is bleeping odd. on my PS3 when I try a superHD movie what it does it it will say high HD then change to high SD. WTF I take it that means it went superHD. that is one odd bug. I got 10mpbs down so shoudl be not issues getting superHD. that is enough is it not?


resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10

said by TOPDAWG:

ok that is bleeping odd. on my PS3 when I try a superHD movie what it does it it will say high HD then change to high SD. WTF I take it that means it went superHD. that is one odd bug. I got 10mpbs down so shoudl be not issues getting superHD. that is enough is it not?

SuperHD isn't up & running just yet.
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP

EcHoMaN

join:2003-05-04
Toronto, ON

said by resa1983:

said by TOPDAWG:

ok that is bleeping odd. on my PS3 when I try a superHD movie what it does it it will say high HD then change to high SD. WTF I take it that means it went superHD. that is one odd bug. I got 10mpbs down so shoudl be not issues getting superHD. that is enough is it not?

SuperHD isn't up & running just yet.

It looks to be in use for me.....


Nagilum
Premium
join:2012-08-15
Kitchener, ON
reply to El Quintron

Is anyone able to confirm whether TSI's DNS servers must be used to access the super HD content? Or can I use Google DNS?
--
"The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it." - John Gilmore, 1993