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Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada

Need help building a desktop gaming computer

This is the first time I'm assembling my own computer, but I have experience swapping parts.

I'm looking to build a middle class gaming computer. Nothing too fancy, around $500-600. I'll be playing Blizzard and Maxis games, for the most part. If affordable, I might also play more demanding games like Far Cry 3. I would also like this computer to be reasonably quiet, I know some fans are better than others. Maybe even future proof in some regards.

So far, I have a Windows 8 Pro 64 bit license and a monitor. I need the actual computer, including the case/power supply.

I would rather stick with Intel and Nvidia parts. I've seen people say the i5 is sufficient for gaming, but I'd like to hear more opinions on that. If the i7 isn't much more expensive, I would rather get that.

I'm looking for some general guidance here. I'm not familiar with the different cases, power supply, video cards, etc. I'm not sure how to avoid bottlenecks or anything like that.

I'll be using NCIX.com or newegg.ca

Any help would be greatly appreciated.



Ghastlyone
Premium
join:2009-01-07
Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

You definitely aren't "future proofing" much on a 500-$600 budget. You're going to be limited on what you can do with such a small amount.

CPU and GPU are going to take up most that amount.

Even a lower end locked i5 is going to run you ~$170. That might be the cheapest.

You might have to look into getting maybe an AMD FX-4100 processor to save on money.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Maven

I think you're being a bit unrealistic. You are not affording much of a discrete GPU on that budget, and the CPU is not the weakest link in a gaming setup--the GPU is.

Nearly all gamers today, except the top 0.1%, are using an i5 (the i5-3570k) as the ideal CPU of choice. The only reason to get anything more powerful (X79), is *not* because of anything about the number of cores or hyperthreading, but because X79 offers 40 PCIe 3.0 lanes over 16 in Z77. This *only* comes into play if you are running a multiple-GPU setup at the very high end of things.

For your budget, you should definitely be considering an i3 with about a Radeon 7770 or GTX 650.

Consider this a starting point: »pcpartpicker.com/blog/budget-gam···-hd-7750

Take the OS out of this build and bump the GPU to an Radeon 7770/7850 or Nvidia GTX 650Ti/660 (whatever you can afford) and the power supply to a 450-500w model.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Ghastlyone

said by Ghastlyone:

You might have to look into getting maybe an AMD FX-4100 processor to save on money.

Whatever price-range he is in, Intel is the right answer, still.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Ghastlyone
Premium
join:2009-01-07
Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

said by Krisnatharok:

said by Ghastlyone:

You might have to look into getting maybe an AMD FX-4100 processor to save on money.

Whatever price-range he is in, Intel is the right answer, still.

That's true, I guess an i3 would be a nice setup also.

It gets tougher building a gaming PC with such a low amount of money.


signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5
reply to Maven

700 dollars is low end, some people would even so not serious gaming possible.

Just saying that to reinforce what others have said.

You want to budget at least 200 for the gaming video card, alone. Gaming video card capable power supply, certainly more than 60 dollars. Motherboard, more than 150. RAM, well it depends, but easily 100? CPU, if Intel, we're talking 150+. OS (legit license of windows), 100? Optical drive, 30 bucks. Hard drive, 100. Cables and sundries, 20 bucks. That is all MINIMUM, LOW BALL. That is over 800.

I've built crummy systems for less, but something always failed in the build, usually the cheap motherboard (good brands but low end models), or the RAM, or the CPU (once), or the HD, or, 3 times, the SMPS. Building on the cheap can be expensive.

Also, you are in Canada? OOPS, things go up even more...

I don't say this to dash your hopes, but IF you can save money up, take that route.
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.



Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada

I appreciate everyone's honesty. I thought desktop PCs were quite a bit cheaper than that, especially compared to laptops.

If I need to pay around $700 for a good setup, then I won't go any further. I'll probably just get a decent laptop that can handle Starcraft 2 and the upcoming SimCity at mid settings or even low.

Thanks everyone



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5

1 edit
reply to Maven

Oh, well, once again, you need to be realistic. A gaming grade laptop will cost up to 100% more than an equivalent desktop.

Furthermore, gaming laptops are notorious for overheating and failing (solder joints separating, chips frying, connectors breaking). Pay 200 for a gaming video card on a desktop home build? Well, first of all, you can't buy or install a gaming video card in a laptop, second of all, 200 turns into 400 on a laptop for comparable performance, or MORE.

A gaming laptop for low end will cost you upwards of 1000 dollars and will be more prone to failure, in fact, if you buy for quality AND performance, look to spend much more, hundreds more.

On top of this, Gaming laptops are huge, bulky, cumbersome contraptions. They almost only come in Large and wide screen versions, run hot as hell, and if any part fails, the entire thing must be sent in for replacement or, if you are very lucky, repair.

A 700 desktop will be a 1000+ dollar laptop, actually, really, much more.

Want to add hard drives? You can't on most units, and certainly NOT more than one more drive, and be prepared to pay the manufacturers for the drive and adapter!!! Want to upgrade to bluray? Good luck. Want to significantly upgrade RAM? Sorrrreeeee. Want to swap CPUs or heatsinks, NOPE, won't happen.

I think BEFORE you make any decision, you might just read up a little in our and other forums first.

Basically, for 1200 you can build a damned nice desktop, an equivalent laptop will either cost more than 2000, or you won't even find one of equal caliber.

Building your own IS a good idea, so long as your not the kind of guy that breaks lawnmowers trying to fix them (I have a sibling whose wife does all the mechanical stuff).

My impression is at this point, you will benefit from becoming as informed as possible on various chipsets, processors, and GPUS and what they can handle, and THEN shop accordingly.

Few people here would say, oh, gee, if a desktop costs that much, I'll get a laptop. People here say the reverse more often.

And that reminds me, chipsets/BIOS... Laptops use MUCH MUCH more limited ones, a home built desktop will afford you the opportunity of owning a wide range of chipsets and BIOS. AND VASTLY SUPERIOR COOLING!

Here's medium-low/medium level game card for desktop:

»www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi···3A339726

Now, as your fist project, find a laptop for cheap that will give the equivalent. How much more will it cost?

And keep in mind, laptop video and processors trail desktop as far as up to date technology, IOW, laptops lag months behind desktops in current tech.

Before you make ANY decisions, let's be rational and start learning from each other. What questions do you have, and how might we guide you on your knowledge endeavor?
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.


billydunwood

join:2008-04-23
united state
kudos:2

2 edits
reply to Maven

You don't need Intel CPU, AMD will do just fine. Here is my breakdown of what I got of Newegg that would be just fine for you:
AMD FX-6300(6 core) CPU- $139.99
AsRock 880GM-LE Motherboard- $59.99
Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB(2x4gb) - $$34.99
EVGA GTX650- $109.9(with a $10 rebate)
Seagate Barracuda 500gb Hard Drive- $59.99
Gigabyte GZ-F5HEB Case- $22.99
Cooler Master ExTreme 500w PSU- $39.99(AND $10 rebate)
Artic Freezer A30- $29.99
Asus DVD Burner- $19.99

Total: $517 before taxes and shipping, and before $20 rebate. It is under your $600 budget. It would be perfect for gaming, and all of this is on newegg.com.

EDIT: Replaced the 550ti with a GTX650
--
No Victim=No Crime



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5

1 recommendation

a 60 dollar motherboard? Surely you jest. AMD? Surely you jest? Coolermaster crap power supply? Surely you jest. Outdated video card? Just much? Crap case? Oh, why do I bother, who is posting this anyways...


billydunwood

join:2008-04-23
united state
kudos:2

said by signmeuptoo:

a 60 dollar motherboard? Surely you jest. AMD? Surely you jest? Coolermaster crap power supply? Surely you jest. Outdated video card? Just much? Crap case? Oh, why do I bother, who is posting this anyways...

#1, this is a BUDGET gaming build with a $500-$600 price range. AMD is perfectly fine, I have one myself. Now, he doesnt need a $150 motherboard to play his games. He can upgrade it if he wants, and it has good reviews. Coolermaster supply has good reviews, will power everything and is a good price. Outdated video card, just fixed it with a GTX650 for $10 more. Crap case, doesnt really matter. The case will fit everything, and again, he can upgrade if he wants.
If this was a higher price range, surely I would have different parts.
--
No Victim=No Crime


Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada
reply to Maven

OK, just toying here. How is this build?

Zalman Z9 Plus ATX Mid Tower Case Black 3X5.25 1X3.5 5X3.5INT No PS w/ Fan Controller & Temp Display - $50

Intel Core i5 3570K Unlocked CPU & MSI Z77A-GD65 DDR3 SLI Motherboard - $375

ASUS GeForce GTX 660 OC DirectCU 1020MHZ 2GB 6.0GHZ GDDR5 2xDVI HDMI DisplayPort PCI-E Video Card - $240

Kingston KHX1600C9D3B1K2/8GX 8GB Kit 2X4GB 1600MHz DDR3 240PIN DIMM Unbuff Hmp HyperX CL9 - $47

Corsair CX Series CX500 500W ATX 12V 80 Plus Bronze Power Supply 140mm Fan - $70

For a total of $781.94 before taxes and shipping. I realise that this is way over my budget.

Is this a good deal, or just as expected?

Keep in mind I have a spare HDD, a Windows 8 license and a monitor.



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5

Before I reply, read tomshardware, anandtech, jonnyguru, hardwarecanucks, hardocp...

For example:

»www.tomshardware.com/charts/cpu-···140.html

Maven, we usually use a dealer link to compare hardware lists, that might help, because it attaches price and shipping and other things to the consideration of the quality and features. Plus it is easier for people to look up. Many here use newegg links.

No need to buy an oc video card, get a stock and OC it yerself.

Yes! a K version processor IF you're gonna buy a good heathink, so you can clock to your heart's content.

Too little RAM by today's standards, of course it is fine, but RAM is CHEAP! get 16!

Corsair 80+, good, bronze on the lower end, but good.

Case, I have to look it up, make sure it will have enough room for the video card length and depth, has good inward and outward fannage (side case and top case fans, or at least fan mounts). Has USB 3.0 outlets, other quality features...

MSI, a good brand, Z77 chipset, good idea.

I can't advise as well as gamers here, but that build should be fine. If you compare your build and the other one suggested for 200 less, there is a massive difference in quality, power, and features. Massive.

Few people are building game boxes with AMD any longer. I don't know what reviews he is talking about, as I haven't done reading of late, but at least a while back, Coolermaster power supplies were crap. A 60 dollar motherboard is asking for trouble. I've had 120 dollar mainboards fail. For a gaming build, with a good chipset and features, 150 bucks is the start of the sweet spot in many cases.

Billy is nice to try to help, but I myself defer to more experienced members here, no offense to dunwood, but, well, sorry...

Billy, he was talking about a MEDIUM build, not a bottom of the wine barrel rotgut...

Maybe your build is fine for you, but I wouldn't advise to anyone with his expectations do that build, just too risky.
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.



Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada

Could you recommend one of these "dealer links"? I'm in Canada, so it might complicate things.



MacGyver
Don't Waste Your Energy
Premium,ExMod 2003-05
join:2001-10-14
Canada
kudos:2

Some Canadian computer part sources are:
newegg.ca
canadacomputers.com
ncix.com


billydunwood

join:2008-04-23
united state
kudos:2

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to signmeuptoo

said by signmeuptoo:

Before I reply, read tomshardware, anandtech, jonnyguru, hardwarecanucks, hardocp...

For example:

»www.tomshardware.com/charts/cpu-···140.html

Maven, we usually use a dealer link to compare hardware lists, that might help, because it attaches price and shipping and other things to the consideration of the quality and features. Plus it is easier for people to look up. Many here use newegg links.

No need to buy an oc video card, get a stock and OC it yerself.

Yes! a K version processor IF you're gonna buy a good heathink, so you can clock to your heart's content.

Too little RAM by today's standards, of course it is fine, but RAM is CHEAP! get 16!

Corsair 80+, good, bronze on the lower end, but good.

Case, I have to look it up, make sure it will have enough room for the video card length and depth, has good inward and outward fannage (side case and top case fans, or at least fan mounts). Has USB 3.0 outlets, other quality features...

MSI, a good brand, Z77 chipset, good idea.

I can't advise as well as gamers here, but that build should be fine. If you compare your build and the other one suggested for 200 less, there is a massive difference in quality, power, and features. Massive.

Few people are building game boxes with AMD any longer. I don't know what reviews he is talking about, as I haven't done reading of late, but at least a while back, Coolermaster power supplies were crap. A 60 dollar motherboard is asking for trouble. I've had 120 dollar mainboards fail. For a gaming build, with a good chipset and features, 150 bucks is the start of the sweet spot in many cases.

Billy is nice to try to help, but I myself defer to more experienced members here, no offense to dunwood, but, well, sorry...

Billy, he was talking about a MEDIUM build, not a bottom of the wine barrel rotgut...

Maybe your build is fine for you, but I wouldn't advise to anyone with his expectations do that build, just too risky.

said by signmeuptoo:

Before I reply, read tomshardware, anandtech, jonnyguru, hardwarecanucks, hardocp...

For example:

»www.tomshardware.com/charts/cpu-···140.html

Maven, we usually use a dealer link to compare hardware lists, that might help, because it attaches price and shipping and other things to the consideration of the quality and features. Plus it is easier for people to look up. Many here use newegg links.

No need to buy an oc video card, get a stock and OC it yerself.

Yes! a K version processor IF you're gonna buy a good heathink, so you can clock to your heart's content.

Too little RAM by today's standards, of course it is fine, but RAM is CHEAP! get 16!

Corsair 80+, good, bronze on the lower end, but good.

Case, I have to look it up, make sure it will have enough room for the video card length and depth, has good inward and outward fannage (side case and top case fans, or at least fan mounts). Has USB 3.0 outlets, other quality features...

MSI, a good brand, Z77 chipset, good idea.

I can't advise as well as gamers here, but that build should be fine. If you compare your build and the other one suggested for 200 less, there is a massive difference in quality, power, and features. Massive.

Few people are building game boxes with AMD any longer. I don't know what reviews he is talking about, as I haven't done reading of late, but at least a while back, Coolermaster power supplies were crap. A 60 dollar motherboard is asking for trouble. I've had 120 dollar mainboards fail. For a gaming build, with a good chipset and features, 150 bucks is the start of the sweet spot in many cases.

Billy is nice to try to help, but I myself defer to more experienced members here, no offense to dunwood, but, well, sorry...

Billy, he was talking about a MEDIUM build, not a bottom of the wine barrel rotgut...

Maybe your build is fine for you, but I wouldn't advise to anyone with his expectations do that build, just too risky.

The reviews of the product are on Newegg, where I got it from. The PSU was 4/5 starts with 348 reviews. That wouldn't indicate crap. And AMD is a good value. If an AMD FX-6300 6 core processor will run his games and more just fine, what is the point of getting an intel? Regarding the motherboard, yes I would get something a bit better than what I posted, but again, the ASRock had good reviews. I base my specs off of reviews as well as price. Oh, and I have an AMD processor, older but good graphics card and a $60 motherboard, and I am running games just fine, and have been for 2.5 years. All products, no matter how cheap or expensive fail eventually. Oh and if you OC a video card yourself, you most likely void the warranty.
--
No Victim=No Crime


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to billydunwood

said by billydunwood:

#1, this is a BUDGET gaming build with a $500-$600 price range. AMD is perfectly fine, I have one myself.

Sounds like Post-purchase rationalization and choice supportive bias.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

1 recommendation

reply to Maven

Alright OP, people are spreading FUD in your thread about AMD vs. Intel, so as it pertains to you, I am going to settle it for you and let you decide which way you want to go (despite the fact that you have already said you prefer we go with Intel).

Let's humor the fanboys for a second. In Tom's "Best Gaming CPUs - Dec 2012" article, the 3.3 GHz dual-core (w/HT) Intel Core i3-3220 and the 4.2 GHz quad-core AMD FX-4170 tie in the $120 category, with the following caveats:

tl;dr Buy the 4170 if you plan to aggressively overclock it to maximize its potential in games. Buy the i3-3220 for better out-of-box stock speeds.

AMD FX-4170
At its stock clock rate, AMD's FX-4100 isn't a compelling gaming product compared to lower-priced options from Intel. We've seen in the past, however, that enthusiasts appreciate its unlocked ratio multiplier and available headroom to scale up. When it's pushed, this processor helps enable similar frame rates as some of our favorite Core i3 CPUs, though it uses significantly more power in the process.

But the FX-4170 comes with a much higher 4.2 GHz base clock, and consequently offers compelling performance right out of the box. With a price tag recently lowered to $120, it's at least capable of competing against the Core i3-2120.

Unfortunately, AMD's FX-4170 uses almost two times as much power to achieve similar performance in a great many applications. If you disregard consumption and focus on price/performance, though, we've at least established that it's at least a viable option.

Intel Core i3-3220
As our sub-$200 CPU gaming comparison article proved, Intel's older Core i3-2120 was a surprisingly capable gaming processor, with the ability to beat some of the quad-core CPUs we've recommended at this price in the past. The company's Ivy Bridge-based Core i3-3220 boasts an even more efficient architecture, enabled by advanced manufacturing technology and a thermal ceiling 10 W lower.

Yes, you have to essentially forsake the potential for overclocking, given (what we consider to be) enthusiast-unfriendly locks on the multiplier and a base clock with very little room to scale beyond 100 MHz. But its stock performance is compelling, and this CPU still warrants a recommendation.

Read our review of the Ivy Bridge-based CPUs here.

This is how bad AMD has it. A 4.2 GHz quad-core CPU *can* match the performance of a 3.3 GHz dual-core CPU. Oh did we mention that the AMD has a TDP of 125w versus the Intel's 55w? That means the AMD chip is scarfing down more than twice as much power (227.27%, to be exact) for similar performance at stock speeds.

So Tom's gives a tie, with the caveat that the AMD chip must be overclocked to beat the Intel Core i3. It is worth noting that this is the only AMD chip recommended at any price point in the article.

"But what about the FX-4100, -6100, and -8120?" you might ask. Well, the $75 dual-core 3.0 GHz Intel Pentium G860 beats them all out. So don't listen to the fanboys trying to feel good about their bad purchase. If you are not overclocking, you should always go with Intel chips. If you are overclocking, you should always go with Intel chips, except at the $120 price point.

But what is the performance of the AMD FX-4170 at stock speeds? The answer is found on the last page of the article, where Tom's groups CPUs by hierarchy. The AMD FX-4170 is in the same class as the following:
• Core i7's: 860, -920, -930, -940, -950
• Core i5: 3220T, -750, -760, -2405S, -2400S
• Core 2 Extremes: QX9775, QX9770, QX9650
•Core 2 Quads: Q9650
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Maven

You asked for a build on your budget, so here it goes. This system should even be able to handle Far Cry 3 on decent settings. Prices shown are all Canadian and reflect shipping, as well as any MIRs available.

• CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 Ivy Bridge 3.3GHz LGA 1155 55W Dual-Core CPU (COMBO w/MOBO) - $130
• Mobo: ASRock Z77M LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard - $103
• Memory: G.SKILL Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - $46
• GPU: SAPPHIRE 100358L Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 - $116
• HDD: Western Digital WD Black WD5003AZEX 500GB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache - $90
• PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX500 500W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - $51
• Case: Rosewill LINE-M Micro-ATX Mini Tower Computer Case, Dual USB 3.0, come with Dual Fans, Support up to 4 Fans, 12.5" card - $51
• ODD: ASUS 24X DVD Burner SATA - $27
TOTAL: $614 w/shipping and rebates

Possible upgrades:
• $54 will step you up to a considerably beefier Radeon 7850 GPU
• $15 will step you up to a full-size mobo (COMBO)
• $15 will step you up to a full-size case--recommended if you upgrade your mobo to full-size (try this one or this one)
• $20 more will upgrade the HDD to a 1TB Caviar Black
• $97 will add a 90 GB SSD for much faster boot times and loading screens

Hope this helps--feedback is appreciated.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Maven

Start here:
»techreport.com/review/24059/syst···-current

Everything you need to know is in there.

Now if you are doing an upgrade and are keeping general things like HD's, DVD drives, case, P/S, etc. then this is what I would do:

Core I5 - K series for overclocking
Pick a good heatsink from www.frostytech.com

Make sure your current case and P/S can handle the new load and all the new stuff going into it.

Get a GOOD P/S if yours is a no name brand or al cheapo.
(I have a good case and P/S so I'm not worried about it.)

Any DVD drive is fine (I'll keep my old one)

HD's if you are not using a WD Caviar Black 1TB, or Samsund Spinoint F3 tb get one. (I already have 2)

Use TR's recommend mainboard, ram, etc.

Go with Radeon 7870 or equivalent Nvidia

If you already have a 22" to 24" monitor, keep it, (or if you are happy with what you have even if it is bit smaller)

then finally add a caching SSd such as this: »www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···20171667
Review here:
»www.hardocp.com/article/2012/10/···review/1

Total upgrade will be about $800 depending on what and where you decide to spend.

Your videocard is going to have bigger impact on games than processor. Don't skimp on the card.



Ghastlyone
Premium
join:2009-01-07
Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

1 edit
reply to Krisnatharok

said by Krisnatharok:

snip

Damn dude, I didn't know it was that bad. Literally taking a 4.2ghz overclock on an AMD Quad Core just to match an i3 Dual Core @ 3.3ghz. And more power usage and heat at that.

I feel ashamed now even recommending the AMD FX that I did.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Aranarth

Good information but not really germane to the OP and his $600-Canadian budget--you can't really fit an i5-3570K and 7870 without cannibalizing money from other areas (i.e. bottom-of-the-barrel mobo/ram/psu/case).
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Ghastlyone

said by Ghastlyone:

said by Krisnatharok:

snip

Damn dude, I didn't know it was that bad. Literally taking a 4.2ghz overclock on an AMD Quad Core just to match an i3 Dual Core @ 3.3ghz. And more power usage and heat at that.

I feel ashamed now even recommending the AMD FX that I did.

4.2 GHz (4.3 GHz turbo) is the stock speed out of the box. You could probably push it a couple 100 mhz faster to match or edge out the i3 with a good cooler, but that will add additional cost.

It's really only the remotely viable choice for fanboys--any other Bulldozer/Piledriver is a waste of cash.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada
reply to Maven

Thank you for the suggestions. I will be looking into them tonight.


Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Krisnatharok

said by Krisnatharok:

Good information but not really germane to the OP and his $600-Canadian budget--you can't really fit an i5-3570K and 7870 without cannibalizing money from other areas (i.e. bottom-of-the-barrel mobo/ram/psu/case).

I was giving an example of what I would do as an idea to save some money by upgrading a current machine. The article I linked is definitely related to the OP's question. Especially the Econobon on the 2nd page.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

You're right, I missed the Econobox, although their prices will be less than what you can get it for in Canada. It's very similar to what I put together.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.



Gordo74
Premium
join:2003-10-28
Monroeville, PA
reply to Krisnatharok

said by Krisnatharok:

You asked for a build on your budget, so here it goes. This system should even be able to handle Far Cry 3 on decent settings. Prices shown are all Canadian and reflect shipping, as well as any MIRs available.

• CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 Ivy Bridge 3.3GHz LGA 1155 55W Dual-Core CPU (COMBO w/MOBO) - $130
• Mobo: ASRock Z77M LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard - $103
• Memory: G.SKILL Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - $46
• GPU: SAPPHIRE 100358L Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 - $116
• HDD: Western Digital WD Black WD5003AZEX 500GB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache - $90
• PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX500 500W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - $51
• Case: Rosewill LINE-M Micro-ATX Mini Tower Computer Case, Dual USB 3.0, come with Dual Fans, Support up to 4 Fans, 12.5" card - $51
• ODD: ASUS 24X DVD Burner SATA - $27
TOTAL: $614 w/shipping and rebates

Possible upgrades:
• $54 will step you up to a considerably beefier Radeon 7850 GPU
• $15 will step you up to a full-size mobo (COMBO)
• $15 will step you up to a full-size case--recommended if you upgrade your mobo to full-size (try this one or this one)
• $20 more will upgrade the HDD to a 1TB Caviar Black
• $97 will add a 90 GB SSD for much faster boot times and loading screens

Hope this helps--feedback is appreciated.

Build this, but make the video card a 7850, which is still $50 under you $700 budget. This will easily play any game on High settings for years to come as long as it is on one monitor.

To save an extra $20, you could go with a WD Blue Series hard drive, which I actually find runs quieter and just as fast in real world performance.

»www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.as···22136769


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

Maven initially said "$500-600," then came back and said "If I have to pay $700, I'll just get a laptop."

I think the laptop reasoning is flawed as all he'll be able to buy at that point is a GT630M and a 768p LCD at either 11, 13, or 14" form factors. Not much of a computer.

If he could afford the computer I put together for him with the 7850, that would be a rather beastly rig that should have no problem with any current games.

Add a 32GB SSD for caching and it should fly.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.



Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada
reply to Maven

Hey guys, I'm kinda swamped right now so this whole computer buying business is on the backburner, but I should be able to looking into this Sunday (hopefully).

I haven't abandoned the idea of buying a desktop BTW, so I appreciate all the suggestions.



Maven
Premium
join:2002-03-12
Canada
reply to Krisnatharok

Hey Krisnatharok, thank you for your suggestion. I think I may just go with your build.

Quick question though - what is the point of moving up to a full sized motherboard and case?

Also, do you know if the build you outlined would be reasonably quiet? I'm kinda difficult about fan noise.