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jkoblovsky

join:2011-09-27
Keswick, ON
kudos:2

2 edits
reply to resa1983

Re: Copyright - Roles and Responsibilities of ISPs

said by resa1983 See Profile
I doubt it'll be decided before court on the 14th, as they'll want to argue additional reasons as to why they wish to intervene.. There are additional ones other than the ones in their motion to intervene filed last month.

Knopf blog raises a lot of my concerns with respect to the legalese of all of this. Knopf also represented the CIPPIC the last time this came up.

Even though the CIPPIC is involved here TSI still needs to come clean to it's customers with respect to why they are not directly challenging this. Marc statements with respect to not challenging this due to the "new copyright legislation" are false and misleading within law. Knopf who is one of this country's top copyright experts and lawyers pretty much backed up that claim with this post.

The privacy implications of this are huge. I've written about this, in fact I had a lengthy conversation today with an internet security expert, who pretty much is stating that there are currently no laws around data-mining. It's quite easy to obtain information and build a profile through social media sites, facebook in particular (whether it's private or not). The privacy commissioner has warned several times on this, stating that information obtained this way can lead to false profiling. This is one of the reasons why the privacy community is strongly recommending a re-write of privacy legislation to ensure that there is no misuse of consumer information.

Once they have your name, they can pretty much build a case against you. There is an entire industry built around that right now. We're seeing pretty much the tip of the ice burg here and because of current privacy legislation it's pretty much legal.

There is a forthcoming white paper on the subject that in fact will be presented to the government in the next few months. I'm pretty sure I'll be getting a copy of that.

If a company is choosing to expose it's customer base to this, the least they owe is an explanation as to why they are doing it and why they feel the plaintiff's evidence is strong enough, that they have chosen not to directly oppose it.
--
My Canadian Tech Podcast: »canadiantechnetwork.podbean.com/
My Self Help and Digital Policy Blog: »jkoblovsky.wordpress.com/


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
said by jkoblovsky:

The privacy implications of this are huge. I've written about this, in fact I had a lengthy conversation today with an internet security expert, who pretty much is stating that there are currently no laws around data-mining. It's quite easy to obtain information and build a profile through social media sites, facebook in particular (whether it's private or not). The privacy commissioner has warned several times on this, stating that information obtained this way can lead to false profiling. This is one of the reasons why the privacy community is strongly recommending a re-write of privacy legislation to ensure that there is no misuse of consumer information.

Which in and of itself is a really good reason to NOT use Facebook & other social media sites; to always use different pseudonyms on each different site/forum you use; to use TOR or other means of obfuscating the IP trail back to you -- even if you NEVER do anything illegal.