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RobThompson
Caution - Newbie Alert LinuxMint
Premium
join:2012-02-14
Lasalle, QC
Reviews:
·AcroVoice

[Other] Does "Google Translate" translate "VoIP Speak"?

Hello:

This is not me bashing this forum as I realize its' purpose is 'all thing VoIP' and I need and like that.

I have been dabbling in VoIP for about a year now, and this may be a really silly (and probably ignorant) observation, but I think that a lot more people & businesses would convert to VoIP if it weren't so damned confusing to understand what VoIPer's were talking about.

Many VoIP web sites are written in language that only a VoIPologist would understand. When a CEO reads one, his first thought is "How can I save money with this stuff if I have to hire a high-priced IP guy with a major in VoIPology?" Worse yet would be some dollar conscious employee thinking "How can I sell this VoIP stuff to the dinosaur in the corner office?"

Is it really necessary to use "VoIP Speak" to convey a money saving idea? Wouldn't, say Anveo.com or VoIP.ms, sell more services if their web site's simply referred to "lines" & "telephones"?

If you want to sell something in China, *you* write your web site in Mandarin (or some other Chinese dialect) - you don't expect them to learn English.

Just the term "VoIP" still sends shiver's down my spine, and, like I said, I've been dabbling in it for about a year. The oil companies in Alberta are attempting to ingratiate themselves to the world by simply referring to the "tar sands" as the "oil sands".

How about eliminating the word "VoIP" and substituting the words "Internet Telephone" - look Ma, no shivers!

Like I said, it is just an observation.

Rob.
--
Rob.
Blog: »googlevoiceforcanadians.com/

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13

Re: [Other] Does "Google Translate" translate "Vo

You raise some good points.

Still, this is a [technical] website or is supposed to be at any rate.

Asterisk setup, dial plan syntax, codec selection, ringback tones, router firmware, latency and jitter, you MUST have technical language.

When [mazilo] wrote his classic post, "Own a FreeSwitch on a Seagate DockStar for $24.99", once more you MUST have technical language.

Let's not dumb it down.

If there is a CEO in the year 2013 that cannot deal with the basics, then let him or her step out of the way. Heaven knows that these execs are paid obscenely high salaries for bupkis.

I haven't worked much at all on the Asterisk/PBX side, but everything else I know (ATA's, IP phones, routers....) I taught myself. I have no computer or IT background except for an ALGOL programming course in 1975. Anybody can learn this stuff.

Again to your hypothetical CEO, let natural selection take its course. Companies that have more capable CEO's will flourish better. Darwin would be pleased.

But one fallacy you have is that you think this website is for the education or elucidation of those corporate execs. It's not.

They're going to go to business-oriented websites designed to appeal to that audience.

For example:

»www.onsip.com/what-is-onsip
»www.xo.com/services/voip/Hosted- ··· iew.aspx
»grasshopper.com/
»www.aptela.com/
»www.windstreambusiness.com/small ··· /bundles

Yes, you are correct, most of those sites de-emphasize the term Voip.

Still, there is nothing wrong with the word....

....and businesspeople who can toss around words like FIFO, EBITDA, ROE, ROI, NAV, and so forth should be able to handle VoIP.


RobThompson
Caution - Newbie Alert LinuxMint
Premium
join:2012-02-14
Lasalle, QC
Reviews:
·AcroVoice
Hi PX:

Just musings of a neophyte.

I respect this forum and accept it for what it is.

And you are probably correct about the CEO that I presented. I guess my frame of reference, people my age & older, is no longer germane to the real world out there - most of us have been Darwinized to the sidelines.

I guess it's just that the look of fear I see in the eyes of my contemporaries when I suggest saving some money by using an ATA & VoIP at home - it's like I am suggesting that they go get a root canal done. They just don't want to know...

Anyway, such is life.

Rob.
--
Rob.
Blog: »googlevoiceforcanadians.com/


ymhee_bcex
Premium
join:2006-04-21
Tarzana, CA
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·PHONE POWER
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to RobThompson
I can argue both ways... There are car enthusiasts that talk about axles, torque, and fuel injection (they talk about much more "auto speak" - so I am already dumbing it down. CEO of a retail chain doesn't need to understand all that in order to plan warehouse locations and size of the delivery trucks. The CEO of a cab company better have a direct report who does understand; and obviously, CEO of car manufacturer should understand himself.

On the other hand there is no "executive summary" equivalent for VoIP (horse power, gas mileage, 0-to-60, etc). I was trying to help a small business select VoIP provider, and the terms trunk, line, account, even telephone mean different things to different people. VoIP industry as a whole would benefit tremendously if it found some middle ground between cheesy Vonage commercial and this forum!
--
Technical problems are more often than not management incompetence masquerading as technical issues


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON

1 recommendation

reply to RobThompson
Any good CEO understands the language of Business and the Key phrase that all CEO relate to is "What is the Value Proposition and what's my Payback"

For example:

How much do you Pay Bell each month?
I can shave your Bell Bill by 70% and your Payback is inside 6 months!

CEO's do not care about details [they care about money and performance] -- details are left to their designated managers.

So I do not sell VoIP to CEO --- I sell CEO the Value Proposition and then deal with their designated managers on the details.
--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business


XCOM
digitalnUll
Premium
join:2002-06-10
Spring, TX
Reviews:
·Vestalink
reply to RobThompson
said by RobThompson:

Hello:
Is it really necessary to use "VoIP Speak" to convey a money saving idea? Wouldn't, say Anveo.com or VoIP.ms, sell more services if their web site's simply referred to "lines" & "telephones"?

This will never happen.
It is simple.... ITSP can not sell something that is not.... VoIP is an application not a line or a telephone. This would be false advertisement and would be setting the expectations wrong.
--
[nUll@dcypher ~]$


RobThompson
Caution - Newbie Alert LinuxMint
Premium
join:2012-02-14
Lasalle, QC
Reviews:
·AcroVoice
reply to RobThompson
"...VoIP is an application...", that's sort of my point.

Why not differentiate the product/service/benefit, "Internet Telephony", from the delivery system?

It's really just the "P" in "VoIP" that gets to people. Tell them "VoI" (Voice over Internet) and they'll immediately understand and feel comfortable; add "Protocol" and their eyes will glaze over and they'll begin to sweat.

Like I said, it's just an observation...
--
Rob.
Blog: »googlevoiceforcanadians.com/


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
said by RobThompson:

Like I said, it's just an observation...

I like your observation .... Voice over Internet is the point.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to RobThompson
Maybe even "POI" (Phone Over Internet) would seem friendlier. Maybe "VOIP" could be explained as "Voice Over Internet, Phone" or something.

For a totally non-tech person they really only have to understand a few things: They need an always-on Internet connection, they have to have an open port on their router (which means they know what a router is and that they may have one), they need to order and plug in (Internet, power and phone) a pre-configured box (that may have a built-in router, possibly making the other point moot, or not) from a provider, they have to understand that heavy Internet use can interfere with phone calls (can be ameliorated, but not easily by a non-tech person) and that, in a power failure, the phone is out.

It doesn't get simpler than this, really, but if this still sounds too complicated for some people then they ought to stick with POTS or have someone set it up for them.


XCOM
digitalnUll
Premium
join:2002-06-10
Spring, TX
Reviews:
·Vestalink
reply to RobThompson
It does not matter how you pain it... The picture still the same. Once you dive in to it is a whole different world and it will all ways be complicated no matter how you call it... Examples lies all over this forum just search and you will see... By the way those term are all ready been used for years now by company's like Vonage and Magic Slack I mean Magic Jack
--
[nUll@dcypher ~]$

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Vonage started as company called Min-X.com ("The Minute Exchange").

Then they realised that VoiceOverNet + Age (or perhaps VoiceOnNet + Age) gave them the great name Vonage.

Which unfortunately some people insist on calling "Vontage".

I think that from a marketing POV the companies that don't include [Voip] in their names but which DO maintain a mention of communication, were smart at least in that aspect.

CallWithUs, CallCentric, PhonePower, NetTalk, Localphone, Phone.com, ViaTalk, Broadvoice, MagicJack, TeleBlend....

An exception to this, but nevertheless brilliant is Skype. One memorable syllable which can be used as a noun and a verb.

A negative exception: SunRocket. I mean, if you send a rocket to the sun, it gets burned up. That's exactly what happened.

OTOH a fellow named Gates [was] pretty successful describing his business as Micro-Soft.

---------------------

A few years ago the Pedigree dog food company adopted this advertising concept: We're not a "dog food" company. We're a company about dogs.

Some people are for the whales. Some are for the trees. Pedigree is for dogs, because "Dogs rule."

---------------------

On the other end of the spectrum are companies which base their names on Voip: Voip.com, Voipo, Voipgo, VoipVoip (really!), and Voip.MS (formerly Swiftvox).

I guess there are pros and cons to that approach.

It is true that "Maypo" has been around since 1953....

gweidenh

join:2002-05-18
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Internet Telephone?

VoIP is so much more than that. Thats what this forum spends 99.9% of the time talking about though.

Voice over Internet Protocol is just fine thanks.


ymhee_bcex
Premium
join:2006-04-21
Tarzana, CA
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·PHONE POWER
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to PX Eliezer70
said by PX Eliezer70:

A negative exception: SunRocket. I mean, if you send a rocket to the sun, it gets burned up. That's exactly what happened.

Should they have called the company Icarus? Well, Hungarian bus company survived for over a century...
--
Technical problems are more often than not management incompetence masquerading as technical issues

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI

1 recommendation

I never understood the name "SunRocket," it made no sense. Maybe as a laxative to be used outdoors, or a new fireworks company, but nothing about that name implied communications, talking, the Internet.

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
From "Star Wars":

C-3PO: [I'm terribly sorry about all this. After all, he's only a Wookiee!]

Similarly, the people behind SunRocket were only from AOL.

engineerdan

join:2006-12-07
Manassas, VA
reply to RobThompson
said by RobThompson:

It's really just the "P" in "VoIP" that gets to people. Tell them "VoI" (Voice over Internet) and they'll immediately understand and feel comfortable; add "Protocol" and their eyes will glaze over and they'll begin to sweat.

Like I said, it's just an observation...

I see your point. And, you may be on to something here.

Perhaps if VoIP had a friendlier name, it would be more widely accepted by the general public. For example, the term TouchTone was broadly accepted by the public whereas the technical equivalent DTMF seems to only appeal to us geeks.

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
reply to RobThompson
VoIP will [truly] have arrived when no one thinks to mention it.

Do you say to your spouse in the morning, "I'll call you later using electric pulses that travel over copper wires" or "Call me later by sending radio waves through the air to a tower".

Vonage, Skype, Ooma, OptimumVoice, Comcast Digital Voice: These are among the brands that have been the most successful at glossing over the details of how they are carried.

--------------------------

Way back when, TV networks made a big FUSS when a show was going to be broadcast in colour:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=BR3UtOZk ··· UtOZk5Oo


Who would think to even mention that now?


VexorgTR

join:2012-08-27
Sheffield Lake, OH
kudos:1
Reviews:
·voip.ms
Since I also work the sales end of things..... I usually leave the tech terms out while talking to non-techs.

I normally explain it as an "Internet Phone".... your phone calls use your internet connection to complete the connection. Then I hook one up to their Internet and try it. If it sounds good, then you show the price. Explain the setup parts needed......

You usually schedule the install right after that.