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robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo

Re: Sump pit cover - To seal with my subfloor

Check with a sheet metal shop before ruling it out. Everything they do is basically custom.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to robbin
said by garys_2k:

I think he just wants to seal the raw edges, but allow water that finds itself under his floor to be able to flow to the sump. Also, presumably, water ON the floor should be able to flow through the slots and into the sump, too.

Yes, seal the raw edges.
A PT would trim could work, that's another idea to contemplate.

said by robbin:

Go to a good sheet metal shop and have some custom pieces made to protect and reinforce the edges.

Here everything custom is exceedingly expensive.
The edges don't need reinforcing anyway, so the PT wood is a simpler material if I make a trim. Thanks though.

Overall, the idea of a trim/frame is pretty good. I'd cut a bigger sized hole to accomodate the extra width added by the trim of whatever material I end up using. The final floor can still extend over that trim so it's not visible.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo
Go to a good sheet metal shop and have some custom pieces made to protect and reinforce the edges. They can usually work in most metals so some choices would be galvanized, stainless and copper. Take a good drawing and accurate measurements. Probably want minimum of 24 gauge but maybe thicker. At a good shop, they can help you with design with the best way to achieve what you are wanting.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to Jon
said by Jon:

I guess from your picture I might not be understanding what you're trying to do. You want to seal the lid to the floor or just the raw edges of the floor where the hole is?

I think he just wants to seal the raw edges, but allow water that finds itself under his floor to be able to flow to the sump. Also, presumably, water ON the floor should be able to flow through the slots and into the sump, too.

Give this (and now that I wrote it, it's clearer in my mind) I'd suggest some PT wood trim, painted to approximately match the finished floor's color.


Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL
reply to alkizmo
I guess from your picture I might not be understanding what you're trying to do. You want to seal the lid to the floor or just the raw edges of the floor where the hole is?


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to Jon
said by Jon:

What about gluing on a piece of plastic U-Channel.

To what? Two u-channels facing each others so they interlock?

said by VioletVenom:

I was thinking something along the lines of this, not the peel and stick weather stripping. Like you said, that stuff is about worthless.
»www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware···KnOVZ6QY

That seems pretty good.

With all the suggestions from this thread, I'll wait to build the actual panel, then visit home depot to "visualize" the products

Thanks guys!


Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL
reply to alkizmo
What about gluing on a piece of plastic U-Channel.


VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL
reply to alkizmo
I was thinking something along the lines of this, not the peel and stick weather stripping. Like you said, that stuff is about worthless.
»www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware···KnOVZ6QY


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to garys_2k
said by garys_2k:

Plumber's putty? A foam back rod and GE II caulk on that?

How often do you think you'll need to open it? Will you just wait until it doesn't work, monthly, semi-annual or annual inspections?

I think that something like this may be your best bet »www.dynamicrubber.com/inflatable···dex.html but I don't know where you'd pick one up.

Maybe maybe... all ideas are valid The rubber thing seems a bit hard to find as you said, but the principle is similar to the rubber seal at the bottom of garage doors (another idea).

As for the frequency: I'm guessing it would be a semi-annual inspection. It's the first time I deal with a sump pump. The pit was originally filled with gravel by the previous owners for what look like DECADES so that pit will probably not see much action (yay dry land!).

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to alkizmo
Plumber's putty? A foam back rod and GE II caulk on that?

How often do you think you'll need to open it? Will you just wait until it doesn't work, monthly, semi-annual or annual inspections?

I think that something like this may be your best bet »www.dynamicrubber.com/inflatable···dex.html but I don't know where you'd pick one up.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to VioletVenom
Rubber seal for windows or doors is what I had in mind when I wrote about a rubber gasket, though as VioletVenom said, I'd rather have a small gap. The gap doesn't have to be unseen, I mean for sure with the way the vinyl planks will be cut, it will be visible... unless the vinyl planks go out further than the panel in an uneven way hmm that gave me an idea for aesthetics...

ANYWAY,

the weather stripping tape is another idea but then those things aren't made to last and are only made to seal gaps under the sticky side. They don't form a seal when their back (non-sticky) sides are against each others. Though there is almost no avoiding having a small leak in there but the idea is to make it as air tight as possible without going nuts


VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL
reply to alkizmo
I wouldn't use the area you indicated as your seal area. I'd want that gap to be fairly nonexistent for esthetics. How about some type of weather stripping on the vertical face of your sump pit. So the weight of your access panel makes a nice tight seal around the edges. Perhaps some door weather stripping would do the trick.


mibagent_x
Go giggle the handle
Premium
join:2001-03-04
Barnhart, MO
reply to alkizmo
My first idea was rubber door seal from an auto parts store. Maybe even a thick rubber window seal.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
My sump pump is submerged and the drain pipe is hidden inside my wall frame (the pit is flush against a wall).

This means I can finish my basement floor and use the floor space above my sump pit by creating an access panel/cover that matches the rest of my floor.

My floor is Delta+XPS+Plywood+vinyl planks.

My idea is to make a 2x2 opening in the floor over the sump pit and make a 2x2 panel of the exact same material as my subfloor, all glued together into one piece (or use a dricore panel).

I'm just wondering what I can use to protect/seal the edges of the subfloor around that opening and of the edges of the panel.

Here's a drawing

You see I drew the seal line going from the top of the delta and under my final floor (probably vinyl). The delta stays open to let air/water floor to the pit that way.

So what can I use to create a seal between the subfloor and the panel?

A piece of vb sheet? That could get ripped when taking off the cover panel.

Spray foam? It would be brittle and uneven.

Tuck tape? Same problem as the vb sheet, but easier to fix if ripped.

Caulk? If so, which type?

A rubber gasket of some sort?

Spray foam? Tricky to just cover the plywood and XPS, but it's possible.

Tuck tape? Same problem as the vb sheet, but easier to fix if ripped.

Caulk? If so, which type?

A rubber gasket of some sort?