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YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
Reviews:
·Comcast

Question about new 4x (a.k.a. UltraHD) TV signals.....

I was just wondering if Comcast is already transmitting an "ultragrade" HD signal as opposed to a regular HD one? I know the new TV's have hit the market already....albeit very high end market and for those that can afford them...would they be able use them and fully take advantage of the additional pixel count these TVs employ? Thanks...



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

No one is.

The TV industry is looking for the new MUST HAVE to get people buying at the top end again. 3D hasn't done it.
The "Ordinary" (but very nice) 1080 market is saturated and dropping into the very low margin area.

eventually 4k will be needed but not a lot of people are willing to drop "under $10K" and up on a new screen.



baineschile
2600 ways to live
Premium
join:2008-05-10
Sterling Heights, MI
reply to YukonHawk

Also, most broadcasters and TV providers dont even use 1080p yet. They have a few things in the Video-On-Demand library, but there are no linear channels that broadcast in that format.

1080p is dominant on BluRay, and I am sure the 4k stuff will be all disc and download format (gotta have one of those nice video cards everyone is talking about) before actual broadcast tv.


nrobot80

join:2012-12-05
Union City, GA

1080p is the next step in broadcasting. 4k broadcast is projected in 4-7 years. Movies filmed in 4k maybe 2-3 years. Save your money and sit tight for a while.


coold8
Premium
join:2005-05-15
Arlington, VA
reply to tshirt

There is no content, which is why those that can afford it, and would love to have it, see it as a hassle for basically 0 reward. I will have to go change all my large TVs to this format that does not exist, inevitably sacrifice picture quality, reliability, or both, all to have a TV that has no content, and very little ability to transmit that content to me without large infrastructure upgrades that could take several years. 4K needs 2-3 more years before I will even consider it. They need to also get rid of conventional cable and transmit it through the internet, could speed up the process.



NathanO

join:2008-08-21
Moorestown, NJ
reply to nrobot80

Sony is launching a 4K download service this year. Most movies from the past 2-3 years have been filmed in either film or >4K digital (I could be wrong about this). Most movies upscaled from film and then released on Blu Ray have been mastered in 4K or even 8K. There should actually be quite a bit of 4K content available.

Even YouTube has some 4K content!

I'd guess a 4K movie would weigh in at around 50-70GB, almost small enough for a Blu Ray disk.



Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4

4k and 8k will become more commonplace when or if Netflix ever does it, is what I'm hearing around the offices. Maybe their Super HD project they're all buzzing about could be it? »signup.netflix.com/superhd



Deee

@comcast.net
reply to YukonHawk

There was an interesting piece on NPR this morning on it.
They said a 64" TV was retailing for $24,000

But like the previous posters have said, there is no content for it, and I'd be surprised if there is content or transmission for it in the next 5 years.


Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1
reply to NathanO

said by NathanO:

Sony is launching a 4K download service this year. Most movies from the past 2-3 years have been filmed in either film or >4K digital (I could be wrong about this). Most movies upscaled from film and then released on Blu Ray have been mastered in 4K or even 8K. There should actually be quite a bit of 4K content available.

Even YouTube has some 4K content!

I'd guess a 4K movie would weigh in at around 50-70GB, almost small enough for a Blu Ray disk.

Uncompressed 60 fps 4k from a RED camera clocks in at something like 1GBps. A 3 hour movie would weigh in at like 10 TB.

Youtube does indeed have 4k content... At 6 mbps. Little b.


TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

said by Oedipus:

Youtube does indeed have 4k content... At 6 mbps. Little b.

YouTube downgraded all 4K content to 2K.

Edit: Looks like only the web player is locked at 2K. If you download the video you get full resolution.


SHoTTa35

@optonline.net

Movies from studios have been in 4K and higher (since Digital cinemas have been 4K for years already) 1080P on a 200" screen just doesn't work

I on the other hand not really feeling like I need 4K anytime soon. Give me some good (BluRay type) 1080p and i'll be happy for the next 5-10yrs. I hate this 7Mbps video being stated to be HD. Resolution alone is not the definition of HD. Hell I an make a 2KB image be HD by stretching it if I want to! LOL

Once 15-25Mbps becomes more common (for streaming anyways) then i'll be happy with that. For my household at least, 4K would be a waste.



AlphaOne
I see
Premium
join:2004-02-21
Reviews:
·AT&T Yahoo
reply to YukonHawk

According to slashgear, even Samsung admits 4k won't be mainstream for 5 yrs.

»www.slashgear.com/thought-samsun···8264153/



YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
reply to YukonHawk

Thanks everyone for the great info provided.


Extide

join:2000-06-11
84129
reply to SHoTTa35

Oops, nevermind.