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danman48

join:2007-10-11
Huntington Beach, CA
reply to Reyr

Re: Fios Media Server

Hey Again,

I didn't get back out to that side of the convention floor today sorry and I had to catch my flight home early.

According to the VZ dude...Rev I is for the second antenna, which I'm guessing means MIMO for the extra wireless bandwidth. I don't think they're going to run anything over ethernet. It'll either be wireless or Coax for MoCa.

(Side note: I did go over to the MoCa booth and the DLNA booth and talked with them for a while. It looks like Xbox is going to be a DLNA renderer now. Nothing but the regular stuff for MoCa).

I'll see if I can't get some more info out of the VZ guys on twitter or by email.

Good show. Back to the shadows.


Webcobbler

@verizon.net
What exactly is DLNA renderer? Server? And controller? I never truly fully understood the difference. Etc.

And what does that mean in terms of the Xbox? is it bc of its FiOS steaming app that it has?

If so, Samsung TVs and iPads have the same streaming app. What about those becoming renderers or whatnot ?

Can someone shed some light in that.

Thank You.

UnnDunn
Premium
join:2005-12-21
Brooklyn, NY
DLNA is a protocol for streaming media around your home from one device to another using standard IP.

There are two ways for this to happen:
1. A DLNA Client (a device that can play media) requests ("pulls") media from a DLNA Server (a device that has access to lots of media), or
2. A DLNA Controller (a device that has access to lots of media) sends ("pushes") media to a DLNA renderer (a device that can play media.)

In both cases, there is the storage device (where the media is stored) and the player device (where the media is played.) The key difference is which device initiates the streaming transaction.

Older DLNA devices only supported the first method, where a Client pulls from a Server. This was how it used to work on Xbox 360 and Windows XP--the 360 was the client, and Windows XP was the server.

Newer devices support the second method, where a Controller pushes to a Renderer. This is how it works now with Xbox 360 and Windows 7 or 8--360 is a Renderer and Windows 7/8 is the Controller; this is known as "Play To" in Windows Media Player.

The twist is that the DLNA Server doesn't have to be on your network. There are plans in the works for cable companies such as Verizon to establish DLNA Servers on their networks which any subscriber would be able to access using a DLNA Client (such as a standard 360 or PS3) in order to stream live TV. There would be no special app or device certification needed; the device would merely need to be a standard DLNA Client with support for a to-be-determined DRM overlay (so that you can only stream the channels you've paid for, naturally.)


Webcobbler

@verizon.net
reply to Webcobbler
Question:

If one is to get the Media Server, which requires a new upgrade to the GigE / rev. I router and a new GPON ONT... is that person then required to switch their internet to either the 150/65 or 300/65 speed? Given that the Media Server to me, requires a 150/65 connection. Or can they still have the internet speed that they currently have? (ex. I have 75/35)

Thanks


Webcobbler

@verizon.net
reply to UnnDunn
Thanks for the explanation, UnnDunn.

I assume that this would work on iPads as well?

I would personally stream to my iPad, which would be free ass it is now, rather than pay 50 bucks for xbox live Gold, to do the same thing.


Webcobbler

@verizon.net
Does anyone know if the Media Server will have HEVC? I assume it will because it is ready to be ratified as an international standard this month.

So, better picture at 1/2 the Bandwidth to support future Ultra HD TVs and Tablets etc . It is a must have, IMHO

tennisman94

join:2010-02-18
Palm Harbor, FL
kudos:2
said by Webcobbler :

Does anyone know if the Media Server will have HEVC? I assume it will because it is ready to be ratified as an international standard this month.

So, better picture at 1/2 the Bandwidth to support future Ultra HD TVs and Tablets etc . It is a must have, IMHO

Doubtful, production silicon was only announced at CES, and it's usually at least a year before it appears in any shipping products


Webcobbler

@verizon.net
That's too bad. I would be willing to wait longer for them to have the HEVC codec in the Media Server.