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bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks

fixing honeycomb defect on basement wall

Click for full size
cold patched honeycomb spot on concrete wall
This is brand new construction with partial walkout basement. I recognized too late that the contractor had cold patched a honeycomb area on basement wall with about a 5" swath from top to base of wall. Patch looks like frosting on a cake. The location of defective area doesn't appear to be a threat to the structure necessarily but honeycomb is patched both inside and on the same spot on exterior side.

The problem. The patch got wet during torrential rains last night starting about midway down to the base of wall. Please see photo.

The contractor came over last night and did not seem shaken by the discovery. He assured me he could fix it. But I worry just how he plans to do it. Slathering on more concrete sealant outside isn't the answer imho. The house is only 6 months old and there's plenty of sealant on the exterior walls already albeit below grade.

Thanks for any comments. I suspect that this guy will only want to dig out the earth next to exterior patched honeycomb and slather on more black sealant crap and call it a day. What do you say?
--
"in flagrante delicto"


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

Regardless of whether the patch is permeable, the exterior of that below-grade poured wall should have been waterproofed to begin with. What's on the outside of it now?

Also, do you have water pooling near the foundation? Make sure your gutter system and the grade near the foundation walls prevent water from accumulating next to the house.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

1 recommendation

reply to bcool

Is that just honeycombing? The large vertical almost perfectly straight line would seem to be more like a crack than just honeycombing.

I can't offer any advice really, other than you need to give the contractor a chance to fix it. However I would find out exactly what he's planning to do prior to him doing it, and then possibly retain the expertise of a engineer or at least a expert with concrete repair even if it cost you a few hundred dollars.



bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks
reply to PSWired

First (PSWired), the exterior below-grade portion of wall is waterproofed for sure. I was there when it was done. Apparently the water intrusion started on a portion of the patch just above the black waterproofing line. The patch work is visible right up to the beginning of the sidding. So maybe somewhere just a hair below grade BUT just before the waterproofing an intrusion spot opened??

Secondly, I do have a good storm drain system installed all around the house and so far as I can tell the water should move right on by the foundation due to nice slope in grade.

When the dirt is pulled away, we will also double check the storm drain there to make sure there's no problem with the underground portion.

CDRU: Well I was told this is honeycomb defect from top to bottom.... unfortunately (and I'm still scratching my head how I missed this), I did not notice it until more recently. The fact is that at some point just after the pour, somebody patched it up. Good grief, if it is a concealed crack that would be a worse thing for me I think.

Thanks folks!
--
"in flagrante delicto"



bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks
reply to bcool

Good News!

It appears that the so called "honeycomb" defect on exterior concrete wall did not extend very far below grade---in fact it looks to be in the range of about 12 inches below grade. The defect was cold patched with concrete as I mentioned. So this should make waterproofing the patched area a lot less of a hassle even if the area needs to be retreated in a few years.

That is all. Thanks!
--
"in flagrante delicto"