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bull3964

@verizon.net
reply to MURICA

Re: Ultra HD at CES

said by MURICA:

As it stands now everything shot on 35mm film is 4k ready and everything on 70mm is 8k ready.

It isn't really true though because a lot of the intermediate and post work is done in 2k or even 1080p due to cost.

For example, your previous linked list of Sony 4k movies lists Spiderman 2. Yes, Spiderman 2 was mastered in 4k, but nearly ALL of the special effects work was rendered in 2k and upscaled to 4k for the final master.

There are hundreds of movies that have used a digital intermediate for some if not all of the movie and 4k for the whole process is still exceedingly rare. The final mastering is usually done in 4k so they can strike a good 35mm print, but a good chunk of the process can (and often is) done at lower resolutions and upscaled.

We're basically going to have the same problem we have now with TV series that were edited on SD video in the 80's and 90's. The source elements could be rescanned at the higher resolutions, but to get the final product at that resolution the whole work would have to be re-edited with special effects re-created when necessary. There will be a few things here and there that will warrant and get that treatment, but a good chunk will not.

Older movies with significant cultural importance will likely get the full 4k treatement since they didn't use any sort of digital intermediate and indeed some are already ready (such as Blade Runnner.) But there are going to be a LOT of post 2000 era movies that will be struck from the 4k master and will offer some improvement over 1080p, but they will not be TRUE 4k products through and through.

Basically, the workflow is going to have to change to mastering in 8k and keeping all steps in-between at a minimum of 4k in order to have a real 4k movie and we are a ways away from that.


aaronwt
Premium
join:2004-11-07
Woodbridge, VA

said by bull3964 :

said by MURICA:

As it stands now everything shot on 35mm film is 4k ready and everything on 70mm is 8k ready.

It isn't really true though because a lot of the intermediate and post work is done in 2k or even 1080p due to cost.

................................

1080P (1920x1080P) is considered 2K. Even though it's not quite at 2000 and only 1920. Just like the 3840x2160 resolution of UHD is considered 4K even though it's only 3840 lines of resolution.


bull3964

@stargate.net

said by aaronwt:

1080P (1920x1080P) is considered 2K. Even though it's not quite at 2000 and only 1920. Just like the 3840x2160 resolution of UHD is considered 4K even though it's only 3840 lines of resolution.

I was making the differentiation on aspect ratio, but yes, 1080p is technically 2k.

The point still stands though. Most feature films since around 2000 have been using 2k digital intermediates (especially when special effects are involved) and the practice continues even today depending on budget. Those movies, even with a 4k master, are never going to benefit fully from a 4k display unless the movie goes back to the source 35mm footage and is re-edited and gets re-created special effects (if there are any.) They will be barely better than the 1080p blu-ray copy otherwise.

Older movies that were edited on film can be easily re-scanned at 4k, but there's the question of how many are going to be done.

Let's face it, the only reason why we have blu-ray copies for some movies is that they did an HD master when they did the original DVD release. It's very unlikely that the studios are going to see the value in doing a 4k rescan of their back catalog for anything other than their top gems. It's just not going to be economically viable.