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themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN

Laying hardwood flooring

I'm looking at laying 140sqft of solid hickory flooring. It will end up being a total of 500+ sqft once the complete project is done. Are the manual floor staplers a pain to use? I can rent an air operated one but I can buy a manual for the same price. Also, for face nailing the first row, will a finish nailer go threw hickory? Thanks


shdesigns
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join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
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I found they are near the same as I rented both on my floor. The manual one was easy to move but you had to hit it hard.

The air one was heavier to move and you still had to hit it fairly hard or it would misfire. It was also tall so you had to resort to manual nailing far from the opposing wall.

Both got me is a hot sweat trying to go at a good speed to get the job done.

Mine was oak and had no issues using a finish nailer.

Edit: if you have a compressor, check Craigs list for a nailer. You might finda used one you can use then resell when you are done.

--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder

tberg

join:2001-08-23
Greenville, SC
reply to themagicone
I'm assuming you mean an 18g finish nailer. That may be a bit small. They recommend a 16g nailer.
I started my first hardwood room with 18g. I don't see problems, but I now have a 16g, so the last two rooms have been done "properly".
Picked up a set of three nailers (16g, 18g, and crown stapler) at Home Depot for $69. Not the highest quality, but they handle my projects. I already had a compressor. Check out Harbor Freight for a cheap ($40) compressor. Again, not high quality, but it will get you through handyman projects.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to themagicone
I seem to remember a thread years ago here whe someone had real problems fastening Hickory. It is hard.

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota
reply to themagicone
Hickory is very hard and depending on the grain will have a tendency to curl back finish nails so they end up coming out of the face. Been there, done that and said a few choice words over it. In harder woods such as Hickory, I now opt for trim screws even though there is slightly more work involved with pre-drilling and filling the holes. The upside is a tighter hold and no chance of a nail through the face of the board.

»www.grkfasteners.com/index.php/e···fin-trim

Our flooring nailer is the old manual style.

--
Zach


cdru
Go Colts
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join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
said by Zach1:

In harder woods such as Hickory, I now opt for trim screws even though there is slightly more work involved with pre-drilling and filling the holes.

Trim screwing down a wooden floor? That sounds like it would take a weekend job and making it a lifetime project just to get it down.

Badonkadonk
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join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Reviews:
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I imagine he probably means for the last few rows where a nailer won't fit.

As for the OP's question, I'd go pneumatic nailer all the way. Renting probably isn't a cost effective solution, but buying a relatively cheaper floor nailer would probably work just fine for the limited project being described. I have a Porter Cable nailer that has been used to put down thousands of square feet over the last 10 years. It's probably over kill for a few hundred square feet.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
said by Badonkadonk:

I imagine he probably means for the last few rows where a nailer won't fit...

Agreed. Facenailing the last row (or two depending on wall clearance and width of planking).

I pre-drilled for finish nails on oak and it went well. Tedious but well. Some I had to use nailer (air). Never thought of screws...Maybe if I had a plug-bit, then make it real nice!

Go with air nailer for flooring. I had a PorterCable one. Put in 400sqft of 1/4sawn oak. Loved doing that work. Get some earplugs (BAM!) as it can (BAM!) get loud in a (BAM!!) small room. Also, go through all your pieces and preset your layout with piles. Don't have any ends line up across from other joints by atleast 3-4 rows (or at all).
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Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Reviews:
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I use a Porter Cable palm nailer with finishing nails to get in an additional row or so of toenailed wood. Then I face nail the remainder.

Good advice on the install.
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chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
reply to themagicone
Staple down as much as possible. Beyond that a finish nailer should be able to blind nail though the tongue depending on the flooring width for a few rows. Top nail the last few. I use subfloor glue on anything past where I can't get a staple.
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