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MineCoast
Premium
join:2004-10-06
127.0.0.1

Dryer Connection

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I moved into a new apartment and the electric connection for the dryer is a 3 prong instead of a 4 prong. The dryer currently has a 4 prong (two hots, nautral, ground) but the apartment has a 3 prong outlet which from my understanding is two hots and a nautral but no ground.

I've watched a few YouTube videos and it seems that the ground is supposed to be connected to the nautral but to me that seems wrong? Anyway... any suggestions on how to connect this? Thanks in advance.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
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If the dryer plug is 3 prong, then the neutral and ground must be bonded together at the dryer. This is usually done with a metal "tang" included on the dryer. Unfortunately, most of the delivery monkeys from appliance stores either break it off or remove it and pitch it if they are installing a 4 prong plug.
You may have to make a jumper.

The LL should really check to see if the old 3 prong receptacle can be upgraded to 4 prong. If the building is less than 40 years old, there's a pretty good chance the ground wire is there waiting to be utilized.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


MineCoast
Premium
join:2004-10-06
127.0.0.1
reply to MineCoast
Thanks for your reply. That was my thinking too. If you notice in the picture, there are two green wires connected to the ground screw, one of the wires being the power cord. I am thinking that other green wire should be disconnected from the screw and connected to the nautral screw instead or am I wrong in this thinking?

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota
The last time I connected a cord to a dryer, the jumper you mentioned was the bond and had to be disconnected for four-wire connection. Check to see if the other end terminates at the neutral on the block.
--
Zach


MineCoast
Premium
join:2004-10-06
127.0.0.1
reply to MineCoast
Wow. Interesting. I think really screwed up when I connected the 4 prong I think.

I followed the green wire that is connected to the case and it is connected to the nautral terminal, so I had the ground from the 4 prong cable connected to the nautral which I don't think would have been right.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
neutral -- that's how you spell it


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to MineCoast
said by MineCoast:

Wow. Interesting. I think really screwed up when I connected the 4 prong I think.

I followed the green wire that is connected to the case and it is connected to the nautral terminal, so I had the ground from the 4 prong cable connected to the nautral which I don't think would have been right.

As long as everything is working as it should, you didn't hurt anything. However the problem with how you had it was that if the neutral should open, instead of the dryer motor stop running, it would use the equipment ground conductor as the neutral. Under the right circumstances, it also could be possible that other household current could use the dryer as a path to ground which is a bad thing.

The band or strap should only be screwed to the frame if you don't have a equipment ground conductor (aka the 4th green wire). With a 3 wire cord, the neutral and equipment ground are the same. It's not as safe as a 4 wire plug with a dedicated equipment ground conductor, but is permitted by code and is normally only a danger if the unit is miswired or a hot touches the dryer frame and there isn't a neutral/ground available to trip the breaker.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

If the dryer plug is 3 prong, then the neutral and ground must be bonded together at the dryer.

I understand this is how it was done in the past.
This is out of curiosity, but I know that it's a big no-no to have a second N/G bond, and in this case, this would be one.
What's the risk for the rest of the house at this point?


MineCoast
Premium
join:2004-10-06
127.0.0.1
reply to MineCoast
Thanks for all your help The dryer is now connected and I done 3 loads last night without any issues.


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to alkizmo
said by alkizmo:

said by nunya:

If the dryer plug is 3 prong, then the neutral and ground must be bonded together at the dryer.

I understand this is how it was done in the past.
This is out of curiosity, but I know that it's a big no-no to have a second N/G bond, and in this case, this would be one.
What's the risk for the rest of the house at this point?

If there is only 3 wires, it's not a 2nd neutral-ground bond. It's just the neutral touching itself.

It would be a problem if it was a 4-wire plug and the strap/wire was connecting the neutral and ground at the dryer. The problem is the same problem that would affect a sub panel that didn't have the bonding jumper removed between the neutral and ground buss bars.

A possible scenario would be if equipment grounds and neutrals are tied to different buss bars at the panel. The equipment ground buss bar is directly attached to the wire headed to the ground bar. The main bonding jumper between the ground and neutral buss bar becomes loose or otherwise separates. If the dryer was 4-wire with the N-G bonded at the dryer, any current from the neutral bus bar would flow through the dryer's neutral, back to the panel with the dryer's equipment ground, and then to the ground rod. Well, it would do that until the wire melted or the house burned down.

Farfetched example, but it could happen. And I'm sure there are many homes that are improperly installed. The only saving factor is that in order for the problem to show itself, something bad has to happen elsewhere.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by cdru:

If there is only 3 wires, it's not a 2nd neutral-ground bond. It's just the neutral touching itself.

Damnit, yes yes, it's so obvious, but only when you think clearly