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mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to oh LOOK

Re: New Quebec Class Action against Bell, Rogers, Telus, Fido

So are there Quebec laws which would cover this? Because the way it's laid, yes agreed the fees are excessive but wireless prices aren't regulated. As they are private businesses don't they have free reign over pricing or is it different in Quebec?



oh LOOK

@videotron.ca

said by mlerner:

So are there Quebec laws which would cover this? Because the way it's laid, yes agreed the fees are excessive but wireless prices aren't regulated. As they are private businesses don't they have free reign over pricing or is it different in Quebec?

Not sure. Gouging and excessive payables is open for action in all cases as far I know in Quebec. Pretty sure it's the same in the rest of Canada.

Also, with the thousands of similar cases across Canada as documented by the CRTC for the wireless code, it sort of bolsters this.

Court will still have to grant class action status before it continues. It could die at that stage for all we know. Could take a year to 2 years for it to reach class standing. If we follow other Class cases against the Telco's in Quebec (ie. Bell Throttle class action, Videotron Class Action changing unlimited to 100-gigs).

So stay tuned in 2015.

Meanwhile, This one seems only open for Quebeckers as far as I understand it (I could be wrong, or they can change direction). So nothing lost by adding your names.


mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5

Would be nice to get a lawyers take. I've just never seen a lawsuit or class action of this type so I'd like to find out what is applicable in the law and what type of class action cases are allowed.



oh LOOK

@videotron.ca

Just realized the original post states why this started:

"exploitative and abusive fees"

That is indeed actionable, as stated. Not the first time I see this.

Price gouging in this manner (as described above) is indeed against the law.

During the ice-storm back around 1998, I also recall someone being dragged to court because he raised the price of his firewood (logs) from 60$ per cord to 150$ per cord to take advantage of the situation to profit more.

said by mlerner:

I've just never seen a lawsuit or class action of this type so I'd like to find out what is applicable in the law

So getting back to what you said, yup this is actionable. Seen it before. But the court will have to agree with what they wrote up to allow it to get standing.