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Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

Intel lied at CES about TDP?

said by SemiAccurate :

Was Intel purposefully deceiptful at CES?

CES 2013: Not quite lies surround a single bright spot

Intel logo Was Intel purposefully decieptful at CES?With one exception, Intel’s press conference at CES was depressing and a lawyer’s signature short of outright lying. It was not just the usual content free and painfully dull hour long slog, they went as far as possible to deceive the press, and it worked.

--- snip ---

You know Intel is up to something sleazy when they don’t pre-brief anyone, don’t give out specs, and don’t answer questions. It is a sure sign that the products both suck and don’t live up to the meager promises they are making. The new “7W” Ivys do both, they suck and are most abjectly not 7W parts. No specs were give, no nothing, but that didn’t stop everyone from proclaiming the awesome technical achievement that Intel had just made.

The one journalist who mildly called them on it was Anand of Anandtech fame, and his article on the subject has a nice table listing all the -Y parts that Intel even failed to mention the name of at the CES keynote. The problem is that Intel invented a new power measurement mechanism called SDP, and only mentioned it in the keynote in passing. By that, we don’t mean calling it out as a new measurement and moving on, they just said roughly, “7W, pulled in, we are teh awsum! Go us. 7W, no one else can do a 7W SDP part, and we pulled it in. We are so cool, 7W, yay us!”.

The problem is that the cTDP that they invented to make a part lower wattage than it really was was simply not producing good enough numbers so they made up a new test that was easier. Voila, 7W. Go Intel! Yay team! Unfortunately it is a 13W TDP CPU, a mere 85+% whoopsie. A 13W Ivy Bridge part would be a good thing, but Intel had to go and screw it up to get headlines. And headlines they got, at the cost of their honesty. If they didn’t mention SDP in the keynote, I would call them outright liars, but they did, so on a technicality, they are only purposefully deceiving the press, analysts, and anyone else watching. Technically not lying this time, but they are being abjectly dishonest.

Sadly, this didn’t stop them from congratulating themselves until they got bored of it, then the majority of the press took over from there. Sadly, they didn’t have to do this, instead of purposefully deceiving, they could have just been honest and called it a 13W part. That would have been both accurate and technically correct, plus it would have grabbed headlines just as effectively. Honesty seems right out at Intel now, so they had to make up a complete BS measurement scheme that tracks absolutely nothing remotely real so they can technically not have a senior executive lie on stage. Only technically mind you, the intent to lie was still there. Shame on Intel. Shame on the press for not asking about it and repeating the deception. Shame on everyone but CNET, but you know that story by now.

The whole post is a damning indictment on Intel. It says that while tThey may own the desktop market, that is shrinking, and Ultrabooks are failures. But Intel is declaring Victory! and Innovation! over modest or made-up milestones.

I think the lack of real competition in the desktop and mobile markets is starting to show.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
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The article cited is here - »www.anandtech.com/show/6655/inte···ystified

It appears SDP is used as a tablet estimated power consumption measurement. It is unlikely a tablet will be stressed the same way a PC or laptop would be. Note also, the range in TDP is 10 watts to 13 watts, not 13 watts. 7 to 10 watts SDP to TDP is a big deal, but 7 to 13 watts is the outlier not an average.

I agree with the sentiment, Intel should have been more upfront about changing it's measurement. At the same time, Intel may have a legitimate basis for doing so. As tablets, and eventually cell phones are unlikely to be driven as hard as desktops.

From the above link -

The best comparison I can make is to the data we saw in our last power comparison article. Samsung's Exynos 5 Dual (5250) generally saw power consumption below 4W, but during an unusually heavy workload we saw it jump up to nearly 8W. While Samsung (and the rest of the ARM partners) don't publicly specify a TDP, going by Intel's definition 4W would be the SoC's SDP while 8W would be its TDP if our benchmarks were the only ones used to determine those values.

If Intel is taking it's CPU with integrated GPU to places beyond it's normal market, using a similar measurement to chips in that market may make sense.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to Krisnatharok

Both off-topic and on-topic at the same time, and of course, highly opinionated on my part:

The problem is a universal one -- the driving force for things these days is often not technological innovation (as in TRUE innovation, i.e. human beings, specifically engineers, saying "we need to improve thing X to solve problem Y"), but rather marketing innovation. The driving force is now stock market share price and what company shareholders want -- and if the company doesn't make a bunch of fat cats happy, they cry and whine anyway (usually threatening to sue the company which they've invested in, citing "company did not meet X/Y/Z demands/expectations").

Nothing pisses me off more than people who invest in something that's hit-or-miss but always want it to be hit -- it's 100% akin to a gambler going to a casino and throwing a hissy fit because he didn't walk out with more money than came in with. I wish I had saved all the news articles about this in the past 5-10 years, but it's becoming more prevalent. Too many people want to "get rich", rather than just live reasonably.

ENTJ-type personalities, usually bordering on psychopathic combined with greed, capitalist focus, and "f*** everyone else" thought process will be the destruction of our country, if not our planet. Marketing folks often fall into the same category -- they skew/manipulate/deceive in any way/shape/form to meet some kind of goal (which is usually not set by them). It saddens me how so much of the world today lacks moral fibre, or at least that classic socially-enforced "don't be a dick" belief. I'm not Mr. Morals myself, but I'm almost Japanese in the sense that I think of how my actions affect other people before thinking about how my actions benefit (or affect) myself.

--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

Uh oh, I used to be an ENTJ until I graduated college, at which point I became an INTJ. Your Executive Officers description sounds like scenes from American Psycho.
--
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

said by Krisnatharok:

Uh oh, I used to be an ENTJ until I graduated college, at which point I became an INTJ. Your Executive Officers description sounds like scenes from American Psycho.

*grin* Well, everyone is different. For example I come off as an extrovert (fairly talkative and can deal with social situations) but am actually highly introverted. I'd probably be classified by Jung as ISTJ. What can I say, I just hate seeing self-centred bastards thinking about nobody but themselves, then patting themselves on the back for their efforts. Disgusts me.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.