dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1534
share rss forum feed


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

What can be a reason for slow ripping?

I have an older P4 Dell (280) with a PATA DVD-ROM/CD-RW drive running under XP Pro, and is capable of about 4x - 5x ripping.

A somewhat newer Dell with Core 2 Duo (755), SATA DWD-RW (Optiarc 7200) under Win 7 Pro (very recent install) rips DVDs only at 1x. Ripper is DVD Decrypter in both cases.

I'd expect the newer HW to be equal or better, but looks to me something is slowing down the DVD rips to normal playback speed.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



rusdi
American V
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-28
Flippin, AR
kudos:2

1 edit

2 recommendations

Try this.
Open device manager, and find the DVD drive. Uninstall it, then reboot the computer.
upon reboot it should reinstall with any pio/DMA settings corrected.

EDIT: Also, be sure the media is actually capable of being burned @ the speed(s) of your DVD burner.
Good luck!


royhandy

join:2012-11-05
USA
reply to aurgathor

Riplock?

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riplock



Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to aurgathor

Test the same disc in both PC's. Then you will have a true baseline.

As noted by rusdi, it sounds like the slow drive is in PIO mode.

I assume you are also using another tool in conjunction with decrypter as it's no longer updated and can't rip newer discs.
--
Google is your Friend



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

It was probably the case of incorrect settings since the uninstall/reinstall seem to have fixed it -- ripping at 7.5x right now.

As for other tools -- while I do have AnyDVD, it is not installed on this PC due to certain undesirable side effects.

Thanks for all who replied.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

Issue in question almost certainly has nothing to do with "settings" -- it most often has to do with what the CD/DVD drive firmware determines is a safe speed (i.e. if the drive finds that there's too much disc vibration it can/will limit the speed -- quite possibly for the entire rip). This can also be limited by the underlying disc itself (I forget how this works, but it's some sort of vendor data that's stored somewhere on the disc; also includes things like who manufactured the disc and a bunch of other stuff). Some CD/DVD drives also store in an EEPROM lists of disc IDs/models/brands that have specific capabilities or set other such limiting features. Nope, not making any of this up -- all true. Just stuff to keep in mind in the future.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to royhandy

I'm thinking that might be it as well. I found some modified firmware here, it seems that the RPC-patched firmware also includes riplock patches.
--
KI6RIT



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to koitsu

said by koitsu:

Issue in question almost certainly has nothing to do with "settings" -- it most often has to do with what the CD/DVD drive firmware determines is a safe speed (i.e. if the drive finds that there's too much disc vibration it can/will limit the speed -- quite possibly for the entire rip).

Unfortunately, I no longer have the original DVD to verify this theory, but since I have a ghost image of the previous state, it shouldn't be too difficult to restore the system to its previous state and test to see if it happens with other DVDs.

Normally, rips start out kinda slow (2x - 3x, then go up to 4x - 5x, sometimes maybe more). When it failed, it started out at 0.8x and then went up to 1x. I rebooted around the 5 mins mark, started anew, and at the 10 mins mark I concluded that it's better to use the other PC, which ripped the DVD just fine in little less than 20 mins.
--
Wacky Races 2012!

spud

join:2007-03-24
Constantine, MI

He means That Many DVD-writers have a learning feature that use the 'Disc ID' being used. These are the unique codes of the disc that allow us to tell who made then (or rather who made the dye used on them) and what speed they're designed for, be it 4x, 8x, 16x etc.The learning feature allows the drive to collect empirical data from its actual usage.
I do not think that is your problem
DID you check the Direct Memory Access
check that DMA settings are all set to DMA if available.



rusdi
American V
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-28
Flippin, AR
kudos:2
reply to aurgathor

Glad to hear that fixed it for you!

I always like to try the easy things first. Many times, something as simple as a "uninstall/reinstall" corrects a lot of hardware troubles, (not always) but it's a good starting point for trouble shooting.

Happy ripping!



runnoft
Premium
join:2003-10-14
Nags Head, NC
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

It was probably the case of incorrect settings since the uninstall/reinstall seem to have fixed it -- ripping at 7.5x right now.

A Dell that shipped with incorrect settings???

/shockface

Enjoy!

n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to aurgathor

Whoops, somehow I missed that post. Good to hear it's working now .
--
KI6RIT



mmainprize

join:2001-12-06
Houghton Lake, MI
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to royhandy

Interesting, i did not know about this.
That must be because i always check customer reviews of the DVD burners before i buy one to make sure it is the best model without these kind of problems.
»www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers