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netseeker

@verizon.net

Setting up WiFi for a large home

I need help setting up a wifi network for a large house in Delhi. The house is 4 floors, including the basement, concrete roofs, brick walls, and basement is built like a concrete bucket (like all houses in delhi). Each floor has about 1000-1400sq ft area.

We had some kind of idea and have installed LAN cables throughout the internal wiring of the house. However, now as we are getting closer to the move in, I'm not sure how the wireless setup will actually be done. I'm moderately technically intelligent, and would love to hear some ideas and suggestions on how this can be done. I would also be willing to hire someone in Delhi who can set this up and maintain this for me.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
The easy-peasy way to do it is to install a number of APs in your house in the areas you want to service.

In my house (3 levels, ~4,000 sq.ft.) I have 4 APs. The power is set low so that they service just that area and are on different channels. I use Ch. 1 & Ch. 11 since Ch. 6 is trashed in my area.

The SSIDs are different...the laptops and tablets automatically connect to the appropriate AP when I am in the area.

Works well...no particular issues.
--
Nothing makes an American want to do something more than telling them they can't.



netseeker

@verizon.net
Just so i can confirm i'm understanding this right..
You're recommending i put in a Wireless Router in a central location and then set up AP's (i'm assuming you mean wireless ones) all around the house?

a few questions if you dont mind?
1. how do i configure the AP's to connect up to the wireless network broadcasted by my the Router?
2. Do you actually mean that i'll have multiple networks in the home, and then the device will switch between saved networks, as i move around?


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
Click for full size
This is how I have mine set up...

Internet > modem > router (w/ DHCP) + switch > wire to location > AP

The connection between the router (which has a swtch in it, probably) and the APs is by the Cat5 you installed previously.

Question #1: There will be a configuration menu to set up the AP.

Question #2: Short answer is yes.

--
Nothing makes an American want to do something more than telling them they can't.



Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to netseeker
You probably need one AP per floor as a very rough start.
The router need not be one of the APs (could be a straight router).
I would put the router where it makes sense for you in terms of access for troubleshooting and control (I have mine in my office next to two modems (cable and dsl), and wiring closet is in garage.

The ideal location for your router may or may not be an ideal location for one of your APs. Best thing to do is get your router, hook up a single AP and then go around doing a mini site survey to discern signal strength and throughput from a portable device (netbook, smartphone etc). In this way you should be able to determine coverage, and where you need more or less APs. Then purchase more APs. You will need a switch in the central location of all the wires (usually terminate at a wiring closet).

APs are connected via LAN cable back to a switch which is connected to a lan port on the router. You have two choices on the AP, set it up to get LANIP automaticallly by dhcp or you can set them manually within the subnet of the router.

Check out the 30. section
»Wireless Networking Forum FAQ
--
Ain't nuthin but the blues! "Albert Collins".
Leave your troubles at the door! "Pepe Peregil" De Sevilla. Just Don't Wifi without WPA, "Yul Brenner"

LlamaWorks Equipment


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to John Galt
said by John Galt:

This is how I have mine set up...

Internet > modem > router (w/ DHCP) + switch > wire to location > AP

The connection between the router (which has a swtch in it, probably) and the APs is by the Cat5 you installed previously.

Question #1: There will be a configuration menu to set up the AP.

Question #2: Short answer is yes.

Johns wiring is piss poor, see those sharp 90deg turns in the wire. You want to avoid that. Hopefully your house is wired properly. ;-P
--
Ain't nuthin but the blues! "Albert Collins".
Leave your troubles at the door! "Pepe Peregil" De Sevilla. Just Don't Wifi without WPA, "Yul Brenner"

LlamaWorks Equipment


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to netseeker
By the way, expect any minute for a poster who doesnt quite know who he is, Clark Kent (aka superman) or Super Nova. He goes by ClarkNova. I predict he will state you need a red PFsense computer box with which to program your own router. Minimal cost.

Tis a good plan if you like to tinker and have time on your hands. Max Flex and growth potential and heck learning is FUN. Otherwise you need to ascertain your current, and a tad into the future, needs for the router bit and buy the right toy.
A top consumer wifi router is the netgear R6300. If you want a more robust router and fidelity you need to spend at least a few hundred bucks (200-500).
--
Ain't nuthin but the blues! "Albert Collins".
Leave your troubles at the door! "Pepe Peregil" De Sevilla. Just Don't Wifi without WPA, "Yul Brenner"

LlamaWorks Equipment


netseeker

@verizon.net
Thanks for all the great advice.

While i still have you here i was wondering if you could recommend a mid-range router and perhaps 400-500ft AP's.

I was wondering if you guys could also comment upon the Amped Wireless Router, will this actually work, it claims 10,000ft (»www.amazon.com/Amped-Wireless-Wi···sim_pc_1)

Thanks a ton, I'm slowly but surely starting to think i understand what needs to be done. =)
I hope that the guys who did the wiring didn't do it at right angles, but i cant say for sure, heh heh.


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
I would recommend avoiding outlandish advertising claims. Go to smallnetbuilder.com for test results for current equipment and read anecdotal evidence from posters in the forums. Some are experts in actual installations so they have valuable experience.


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer, AB
reply to netseeker
Like stated, setup multiple AP's in corners of the house. Unlike what's been stated, I would suggest having them all on the same SSID and password, just different channels, or even let them auto choose a channel. This way there's only one SSID being broadcasted. This is what I've been doing for a few years and worked flawlessly.

On a side not, I got tired of having multiple AP's, so I buckled and got the d-link DAP-2553 and have been blown away. Tons of options and features, and the range is wicked. I've got it in the most center part of my house and sitting at the start of the drive-way, which is a good 350FT, I get 3-4 bars and can stream a 1080p video on my macbook air perfectly. If you don't mind spending ~150, this device should have no issues doing your whole house. I believe me house is 2,000SQFT per floor. Sits in middleish of house, mounted on a floor joist.



Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to netseeker
»www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless···rts/view

To compare Access Points including the 2553 and its sibling 2555.
In any case I doubt rustydusty that you actually read the post where it mentioned the structure material so results will vary. I suspect that the OP will need a minimum of two radio devices, ie one for the basement and maybe only one for the rest.

I would probably use an AP in the basement and try something like the R6300 on the second floor and see what the coverage is like on floors 1 and 4 and in all corners. If insufficient consider more APs or wifi routers acting as APs. Depends on budget too.

The only reason to have a different SSID is if you want to partition users such as guests as typically one can assign separate security parameters and lan access to different SSID setups. Depnds on the flexibility required. Otherswise as stated same SSID but different channels best. For a 3 radio house 1, 6, 11 for example. For a four radio house, 1 basement, 7 first floor, 11 3rd floor and 4 top floor, or something like that and unless your in part of the world with larger freq range and can spread it out more.
--
Ain't nuthin but the blues! "Albert Collins".
Leave your troubles at the door! "Pepe Peregil" De Sevilla. Just Don't Wifi without WPA, "Yul Brenner"

LlamaWorks Equipment


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to netseeker
In general, new AC technologies and due to frequencies used are not significantly increasing range, in fact the older B technology at lower freq was decent. What changed is the midrange throughput has greatly increased, decent peformance for todays multitude of devices.


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer, AB

1 edit
reply to netseeker
Well, considering the price of 4 AP's, you will over the price of the 2553 which will provide better coverage than most consumer grade access point. Like I stated, I'm getting better range out of this single corporate grade AP that 4 of the consumer grade AP's. I'm posting this standing in my garage, which is ground level is about 5 feet lower than main level floor and has a 10" concrete foundation and I'm still getting 3 bars. Like stated, I've tried a variety of brands of consumer routers and tried them as an AP only and nothing compares to this one device. You really do pay for quality, though. Wish I would of spent the ~150 from the start for this device, I would of saved myself a ton of time walking around my house with a laptop determining signal strength, power levels and channel ranges.

Also, it's not that I don't trust online reviews, my experience with the device is real life and have only seen similar ranges out of some extremely expensive Cisco AP's that cost as much as some vehicles.

meowmeow

join:2003-07-26
Helena, MT
reply to John Galt
You should make the SSID's and security settings the SAME on all your AP's, NOT different. Dunno why people make them different, I see it a lot at cafe's, the library, the mall here. Dunno who the local company that set these up all wrong is. The same network use the SAME SSID, but different channels. The device will the be able to roam between AP's smoothly by handing over to the strongest AP as you move around instead of hanging on for dear life to a weak signal.

emsp32

join:2009-03-02
Chicago, IL
reply to netseeker
Adding onto a thread since the subject line is similar, details are a bit different. Good advice here.

Thoughts/advice in having no cat5 installed between floors? I have 3 floors, and would likely need 2-3 total AP's. Would you recommend a powerline solution to bridge, or use wireless bridge/extendeer features?


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
Myself I would use poweline of the 500 series or later. See smallnetbuilder.com for reviews and charts. I would actually make the effort to wire. Best bet is through closets (less obtrusive).

You can also do the same thing through coax cable if you have that between floors and rooms.

meowmeow

join:2003-07-26
Helena, MT
reply to emsp32
I'd strongly recommend for maximum reliability just pulling CAT5.