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d_l
Barsoom
Premium,MVM
join:2002-12-08
Reno, NV
kudos:7
reply to smbtamu

Re: Traffic Shaping for SharedBand Traffic

If you can prove gateway congestion to Direct, then they can initiate the switch process.

Frankly, I don't know how you could do it with bonded lines or if it is even possible. If you had just a single line, you would use Wireshark to prove it: »SBC DSL FAQ »How to measure throughput speeds on individual packets?
--
TCE Weather -- Mt. Rose Cam

smbtamu

join:2009-08-11
Well, I had assumed based on d_l's post that I had hit a wall over here, so I asked Sharedband to switch me from their Dallas aggregation server to their Atlanta aggregation server.

I did a speed test before making the switch and got 600 Kbps down over 2 bonded lines. After pointing the Sharedband routers at the Atlanta server (5 minutes later) I got 5 Mpbs down over 2 bonded lines. I have gotten 5 Mpbs consistently over the past 12 hours.

Based on this information, is gateway contention still the likely issue or am I back to square one?


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
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said by smbtamu:

Based on this information, is gateway contention still the likely issue or am I back to square one?

I've been looking at the Sharedband site, and trying to sort out how it works. On their "technology" page, they show multiple routers on the customer premises. Each has a separate WAN connection, which can be a mix of DOCSIS (cable), DSL, and fiberoptic services. It looks like they do load balancing tricks on their servers at step 4. Even with multiple DSL connections from the same provider, as you have, packets traveling between the CPE and the Sharedband aggregation servers may take different routes.

d_l See Profile can probably explain the AT&T transit better than I, but you have four DSL modems on four lines. They ride ATM from the DSLAMs (could be as many as four; one port on each) to the AT&T aggregation routers. They are switched from ATM to TCP/IP there, and ride AT&T TCP/IP transit to the Sharedband aggregators. Those could easily be four different routes, and even complicated more if Sharedband is not peering directly with AT&T; your packets could be running on Level 3, or XO, or Cogentco between AT&T and Sharedband. I can't begin to guess how many peering choke points could introduce congestion which isn't on a gateway.

I am sorry, this is complicated beyond my expertise.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum