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awwdad

@comcast.net

York GY8S furnace turns on but does not light.

My furnace turns on at the thermostat however the fan does not kick on and there is no heat from the furnace.

I have a York GY8S gas furnace. Installed 7 years ago and it has run impeccable until today. I checked the indicator LED and it blinks "3 RED FLASHES". According to the Service Manual this indicates 4 things.

1. Faulty inducer.
2. blocked vent pipe.
3. broken pressure switch hose.
4. faulty pressure switch.

Can anyone enlighten me on where these may be located and possibly the simplest fix?


alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Socket Internet ..

In the diagram on the top of page 2 of the manual you posted, you'll see the inducer fan, the hose, and the pressure switch. I imagine either that hose is blocked/loose/disconnected, or (more likely) the inducer fan is siezed and not running.

I would contact an HVAC tech to check the flue for blockage (birds nest,etc) and check the inducer motor and impeller. It's VERY unlikely, but the pressure switch could also be bad.
--
"When the hammer drops, the bullshit stops"



awwdad

@comcast.net
reply to awwdad

Thanks for the info.

Than Fan is not seized. It is running very well. I checked the hose to the pressure switch and the hose is not blocked. I am going to clean the flue later this morning to see what is in there.

The frustrating thing is when I reset the system and turn it on the LED blinks green showing all systems are "normal operation". After 4 green flashes it begins the 3 blink red error code.

Could this mean something more conclusive?



awwdad

@comcast.net
reply to awwdad

I should be more clear. The 'inducer fan' is running just fine.



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to awwdad

You're saying that on a call for heat the inducer motor starts running but then the system goes into lockout and quits with nothing further happening?

The correct way to troubleshoot this fault is to measure the actual "pressure" the switch is sensing with a suitable (very-low pressure) gauge.

If the pressure reading is within the mfr. specs, then the switch is faulty, if the pressure is too low, that indicates there is a vent blockage or the inducer is faulty.

There is not much anyone can do without the correct diagnostic tools, except exchange various parts with the hopes of getting it right the first time.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~


walta

join:2001-05-22
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to awwdad

Go to the exhaust point when the inducer fan is running and see if you can feel it moving air.

Walta



awwdad

@comcast.net

Great info. Thanks Jack b.

Walta: Forgive the silly question... The exhaust point would be the vent where the inducer fan leads to the flue?

I was going to take that plate out to see if that was clogged which would lead me right to the flue pipe.

This all seems to be leading toward a new pressure switch or clogged flue.



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

said by awwdad :

This all seems to be leading toward a new pressure switch or clogged flue.

or inducer assembly.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~

bassnguitar

join:2003-09-11
Imperial, MO
reply to awwdad

I have been dealing with the same type unit. I have read that the original pressure switches are not all that great. York has a better replacement out for them now. Sometimes tapping lightly on the switch will make it work once or for a few days.



awwdad

@comcast.net

If anyone is curious of the results. After tapping on the (What I deduced as the pressure switch nothing happened and I felt much like the dupe. All good though... I am not an HVAC tech so if that was a joke... I was laughing at myself.

I exposed the flue and nothing was inside which needed cleaning (but I vacuumed residue anyway.)

Pulling off the rubber hose that leads from the inducer fan to the switch I noticed I could blow air into the switch but not into the inducer. Aaaaaah????

Taking the plunge I decided to get my hands dirty and completely remove the entire inducer fan. with a sewing needle (the quickest thing I could find) I poked through the post that holds the hose and (as I could only describe) what looked like plumbers putty clogging the hole that held the rubber hose on the inducer. After reassembling this "thing" I knew absolutely nothing about 10 hours ago I cranked up the furnace and low and behold...

I didn't need a new inducer fan.
I didn't need a new pressure switch.

I needed a sewing needle.

To make a short story really long... Thanks everyone... you were a huge help.



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

Good to hear it turned out to be something relatively simple.


bassnguitar

join:2003-09-11
Imperial, MO
reply to awwdad

said by awwdad :

If anyone is curious of the results. After tapping on the (What I deduced as the pressure switch nothing happened and I felt much like the dupe. All good though... I am not an HVAC tech so if that was a joke... I was laughing at myself.

It wasn't a joke. But thanks for posting that info!