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anon anon

@charter.com
reply to Scatcatpdx

Re: Netflix Thug like Behavior.

Well maybe Netflix wouldn't have to go this route if ISP didn't have caps. Only 2 hours and 45 minutes of SuperHD streaming per day would put one over a 250 GB cap.

Also Netflix already pays for it's bandwidth.

And the reason why these ISP have customers paying $50+ month for high speed broadband is BECAUSE of companies like Netflix. If all I'm doing is checking e-mail, weather and sport scores and paying bills online I don't need high speed broadband. In fact I don't need my ISP at all because I can do all of that from my smartphone.

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA
The caps have nothing to do with it. This will still count against caps.

Netflix isn't paying for this bandwidth or at least very little. That is part of the point to this program. To benefit Netflix. It doesn't really benefit ISPs. Customers are going to subscribe regardless of if they can get super HD. It may save ISPs some bandwidth in their core, but it will greatly increase the traffic in the last mile.

Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO
Netflix wouldnt be paying for "this" bandwidth to begin with.

They have their peering agreement with Level 3, whom is the biggest provider of bandwidth in the world and the cost of the added traffic for higher resolution is marginal.

They dont need to have any agreement with ISP's and can send all the traffic they need over the consumer's ISP that they consumer wants to consume and there is not a single thing the ISP can do or say. Netflix is trying to save themselves money with Level 3, but they are also saving the ISP money as well as they too have peering agreements affected that the traffic will transit if they dont have caching servers. They are also allowing the ISP to provide better service to a very popular application that 20+ million people use. That makes the ISP's customer happy and makes them look good for doing the very thing they should do.... deliver the packets you request.

elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink
reply to anon anon
said by anon anon :

Well maybe Netflix wouldn't have to go this route if ISP didn't have caps. Only 2 hours and 45 minutes of SuperHD streaming per day would put one over a 250 GB cap.

Also Netflix already pays for it's bandwidth.

And Netflix is getting the bandwidth it paid for.

But if they want to see their customers happy with "Super" HD, they're going to have to buy some more bandwidth. Evidently, they figured out that last-mile caching is the optimum way to go given the effects of Network Neutrality.

Time Warner is probably willing to go along and allow Netflix to pay to place their caches, but I don't think they're appreciative of Netflix' publicity stunts.

lonon

join:2012-12-21
reply to Skippy25
Yes and because it saves ISPs money it makes any argument against net neutrality bunk. ISPs have been whining that Netflix cost them too much. Now they have no excuse to complain.

Netflix traffic shouldn't count against our caps, but we know that's not going to happen.


RARPSL

join:1999-12-08
Suffern, NY
reply to Skippy25
said by Skippy25:

Netflix wouldnt be paying for "this" bandwidth to begin with.

They have their peering agreement with Level 3, whom is the biggest provider of bandwidth in the world and the cost of the added traffic for higher resolution is marginal.

They dont need to have any agreement with ISP's and can send all the traffic they need over the consumer's ISP that they consumer wants to consume and there is not a single thing the ISP can do or say. Netflix is trying to save themselves money with Level 3, but they are also saving the ISP money as well as they too have peering agreements affected that the traffic will transit if they dont have caching servers. They are also allowing the ISP to provide better service to a very popular application that 20+ million people use. That makes the ISP's customer happy and makes them look good for doing the very thing they should do.... deliver the packets you request.

The way I understand it (I might be wrong) Netflix's peering with Level 3 is not an issue since the session never goes through Level 3 in the first place. Netflix is placing servers on the ISP's network and thus the complete session is on the ISP's network with no part of it being on the Internet.


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon FiOS
reply to elray
said by elray:

said by anon anon :

Well maybe Netflix wouldn't have to go this route if ISP didn't have caps. Only 2 hours and 45 minutes of SuperHD streaming per day would put one over a 250 GB cap.

Also Netflix already pays for it's bandwidth.

And Netflix is getting the bandwidth it paid for.

But if they want to see their customers happy with "Super" HD, they're going to have to buy some more bandwidth. Evidently, they figured out that last-mile caching is the optimum way to go given the effects of Network Neutrality.

Time Warner is probably willing to go along and allow Netflix to pay to place their caches, but I don't think they're appreciative of Netflix' publicity stunts.

Apparently you don't quite realize how bandwidth works for non-residential customers.

Companies pay X amount for X amount of speed, with a guaranteed 99.999% uptime regardless of the bandwidth used (1MB or 1TB a month). Netflix has the bandwidth capacity to run it via traditional streams, but then there is issue with latency and QoS. Putting it in the middle of the network eliminates outside congestion sources, and reduces the strain on the ISP and CDN networks.

Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO
reply to RARPSL
I believe you would be understanding wrong.

Unless Netflix has every major ISP running lines to the main server(s) that deliver the content to consumers and the caching servers they have to be running over whomever they have as an ISP (level 3) to reach those networks.


RARPSL

join:1999-12-08
Suffern, NY
said by Skippy25:

I believe you would be understanding wrong.

Unless Netflix has every major ISP running lines to the main server(s) that deliver the content to consumers and the caching servers they have to be running over whomever they have as an ISP (level 3) to reach those networks.

Please reread my comment. I stated that it was my impression that Netflix is placing their caching servers on the ISP's network so Level 3 is not involved in serving the content to the user since it is coming from a server that is already on the user's ISP network. The only involvement of Level 3 is when Netflix wants to connect to the ISP Hosted Server to add new content.