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AnonFTW

@reliablehosting.com

That's not what the study says at all ...

More hair on fire reporting on the Internet. Here is the text from the Ars article:

said by Ars :
The average American on a peer-to-peer network has a music library of almost 2,000 songs. Of these, 760 (38 percent) are reported to be legitimately purchased. In contrast, those who say they are not P2P users (but do collect digital music files) have an average library size of 1,300 songs. Of those, 582 (roughly 45 percent) were purchased from legitimate sources. Most of the others were ripped from CDs or copied from friends and family. [...] So as we might expect, a larger fraction of the music collections of non-P2P users come from legitimate sources.
So as a percentage - no - pirates do not buy more music. Once you factor in the lost sales due to the media the P2P user didn't buy, the percentage is even more skewed.

Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

So if the legit ones purchased 582 and the pirates purchased 760, who contributed more to the industry?

This is a simple word math problem I am sure you can figure out.

If you want to go with % as you do above lets do that as well. However, I wont try to skew the point as you do.

If pirates purchased 30% of all music sold and legit people puchased 23%, which group contributed more money to the industry?

You can only assume anything is a lost sale. For all you know the 760 files the pirates has are the only ones they would have paid for period. You can't assume that the other 1240 songs are songs they would have purchased if they couldnt download them.

Lastly, if the legit ones that you try to use the percentages on only purchased 45% of their collection, where did the other 55% come from? Oh that's right... they PIRATED IT!

Now move on.



tln

@rockwellcollins.com
reply to AnonFTW

So they consider "ripped from CDs" to be mutually exclusive with "purchased from legitimate sources"? Interesting.

It's funny, Amazon has recently upgraded their cloud player service... now when you purchase a CD from Amazon, they automatically place the songs from it in your MP3 library (I think they call it "directrip" or something like that). Exactly how is that different from taking a purchased CD and ripping it yourself?



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
reply to AnonFTW

I do have maybe 3,000, or more tracks ripped from CDs. Is the ripping a problem? But I am not on a P2P network.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to AnonFTW

well a ripped CD does mean at some point it was purchased. I guess a question is, if one borrows a CD from a friend and rips it does it count towards piracy or a legit rip? Because people have been swapping music via sneakernet for decades.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


funny

join:2010-12-22
reply to tln

said by tln :

So they consider "ripped from CDs" to be mutually exclusive with "purchased from legitimate sources"? Interesting.

It's funny, Amazon has recently upgraded their cloud player service... now when you purchase a CD from Amazon, they automatically place the songs from it in your MP3 library (I think they call it "directrip" or something like that). Exactly how is that different from taking a purchased CD and ripping it yourself?

they control it and know everytime you play them

Androidian

join:2012-12-14
Purcellville, VA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to AnonFTW

Let's do the math quickly.

Person on P2P:
2000 songs * 38% = 760 purchases.

Person not on P2P:
1300 songs * 45% - 582 purchases.

760 is indeed greater than 582. This would naturally lead to the conclusion that the average person on P2P spent more money on his/her collection than the average non-P2P user. The does, of course, start getting murky if the study considers used CD/DVD shops to be legitimate sources - as the MPAA and RIAA don't see any profit from sales in those places.

On the surface, though, it would appear that the average P2P user has spent more money overall than the average non-P2P user.


Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

in the eyes of the MAFIAA the used media shopper is worse than a pirate. Mainly because they can sue a pirate, buying used CDs is not illegal........ Yet.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports



tln

@rockwellcollins.com
reply to funny

OK, when I've purchased MP3 albums from Amazon, I've been able to download them via cloud player to local storage. I was under the impression that the same was possible for "autorip" tracks, but maybe that isn't the case.