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mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
reply to tonyl

Re: WiFi signal Strength

If you don't mind leaving the 2wire as the main router, it's really easy to add something to just extend the WiFi range...

1) Buy new router with better WiFi.
2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.
3) Plug a cable between one of the new routers LAN ports and one of the 2wires LAN ports. Leave the WAN port on the new router unconnected.

Done. No need to mess around with port forwarding or DMZ+ or anything.

/M



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

said by mackey:

2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.

Then my wired machines won't work unless I give them static addresses. The way around that would be to simply create a separate DHCP range on the WiFi AP but within the same 192.168.1 subnet as the RG.

Now I'll have to look into a good but cheap Wireless router.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

said by Wily_One:

said by mackey:

2) Before hooking it up to the 2wire, log in to the admin interface (on the new router) and disable the DHCP server and make sure its IP address is different then the 2wires'.

Then my wired machines won't work unless I give them static addresses. The way around that would be to simply create a separate DHCP range on the WiFi AP but within the same 192.168.1 subnet as the RG.

Now I'll have to look into a good but cheap Wireless router.

What are you talking about? Step 3 causes everything behind the new router to get an IP from the DHCP server on the original router. I said LAN port to LAN port, not LAN port to WAN port.

/M


Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

What I have hard-wired will remain as it now, plugged into the RG. I took your post to mean plugging everything into this new router, which would be down-level from the RG.

Are you saying the RG will pass DHCP requests from machines hard-wired to it on to this other router?



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

When connected LAN to LAN, everything is on the same network/level (they're both equal; one's not "down-level" from the other). This is why you need to disable the DHCP server on the new router. Everything connected to the new router, both wired and wireless, will simply be passed along to the existing RG.

The WAN port on the new router should be left not connected to anything.

With the DHCP server disabled and nothing connected to the WAN port, the new "router" is now nothing more then a dumb switch and wireless access point.

/M



Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA

Yeah see I was thinking of mounting an AP up high, so don't want all but one network cable attached.