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LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Juggernaut

Re: Jailbreaking cell phones to become ILLEGAL at midnight

said by Juggernaut:

said by LazMan:

The lock is to prevent consumers from ripping off cell phone carriers...

If you pay the device off, who cares? You have a right to have it unlocked, and the normal contract termination fee will apply anyway.

But, telco's don't even want to play by those rules.

I agree with you, but I'm not aware of any carrier that won't unlock a device after it's paid off... Rogers does it for free; TELUS charges $25 - dunno about Bell or any of the new entrants...

If a carrier won't unlock it (and this is a US law, and I'm not up on US cell carrier policy) - after it's paid off, that's a whole different deal, and completely wrong, IMO...


Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to DarkSithPro

said by LazMan:

The lock is to prevent consumers from ripping off cell phone carriers...

If you pay the device off, who cares? You have a right to have it unlocked, and the normal contract termination fee will apply anyway.

But, telco's don't even want to play by those rules.
--
"I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots." ~ Albert Einstein


DarkSithPro

join:2005-02-12
Tempe, AZ
kudos:2
reply to LazMan

said by LazMan:

There are some pretty assinine laws out there - this is one I kind of agree with... It's pretty unfair to expect someone else to pickup the bulk of the cost of your phone, don't you think? And just 'cause it's a big, faceless company, doesn't change the basic principal...

If you don't want your phone to be locked to a specific carrier, then pay full freight up front, and buy an unlocked one outright.

What difference does it make if you buy it subsidized, or not? You're still under contract and if you breach the contract you pay a hefty early termination fee. Either way the end result will be the same. The carrier still gets it's money. Also A lot of people root their phone to avoid additional tethering fees. It's absolutely ridiculous that the phone carrier charges you extra to use your limited data as you choose. I think people should fight back and demand roll-over unused data and unreasonable charges, along with unreasonable bloatware the carrier puts on their phones.

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to NormanS

Yes, indeed...



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

reply to OZO

said by OZO:

It looks like we slowly but surely become a country, where The Corporations have all the rights, and The People are left with nothing, except the right to make profit for corporations. This is one more step in that direction, BTW

Somebody in another post, in another forum said:
quote:
Welcome to the Corporate States of America; one nation, under greed.

--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to LazMan

said by LazMan:

Your handset is subsidized...

Is there a cancellation fee, if it's subsidized? It looks like it doesn't matter for the law?

And second, minimum $2,500 punishment for unlocking $200 phone is way too much, don't you think? My "non-subsidized" phone cost me $400, but it was a top model at the time I've bought it... Lot of phones were cheaper than that.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to Cartel

I couldn't believe this. Is this a joke? If it is - it's a bad one. And it's too earlier to make April 1st jokes now.

Questions:
1. Since when U.S. Copyright Office and Library of Congress can change the law? Who had voted for the new law?
2. If customer buy a phone, who is the owner of the phone? Sorry, but the dumb laws are causing the dumb questions... If the owner is the customer (which is obvious here), then why a corporation can dictate what the owner should do with his properly?
3. What is "copied" here, that U.S. Copyright Office should protect from?
4. When we will finally recognize, what that DMCA doing for us, consumers, and when we finally start demanding to trash it?

It looks like we slowly but surely become a country, where The Corporations have all the rights, and The People are left with nothing, except the right to make profit for corporations. This is one more step in that direction, BTW
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Cartel

The lock is to prevent consumers from ripping off cell phone carriers...

Your handset is subsidized... To buy a iPhone 5 outright, for instance, is about $700 - not the $50 that your carrier charges you, when you sign up for a 3 year deal. They count on that 3 year period to recoup the subsidy. Once your contract is expired, some carriers automatically unlock it, some allow you to unlock it for free or a nominal ($20-25) fee.

There are some pretty assinine laws out there - this is one I kind of agree with... It's pretty unfair to expect someone else to pickup the bulk of the cost of your phone, don't you think? And just 'cause it's a big, faceless company, doesn't change the basic principal...

If you don't want your phone to be locked to a specific carrier, then pay full freight up front, and buy an unlocked one outright.



Snowy
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Kailua, HI
kudos:6

1 recommendation

reply to Cartel

Additional discussion found in news.
»Unlocking Your Phone Becomes Illegal on Sunday



sivran
Opera ex-pat
Premium
join:2003-09-15
Irving, TX
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to Cartel

Unlocking is not jailbreaking.

Another law bought by telco lobbyists.



Cartel
Premium
join:2006-09-13
Chilliwack, BC
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Shaw
·TELUS

1 recommendation

A new law that makes it illegal to 'unlock' your cell phone and switch carriers goes into effect today and will carry fines between $2,500 and $500,000, and in some cases, prison time.

The change made by the U.S. Copyright Office and Library of Congress to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act will make it illegal for consumers to unlock mobile devices without the permission of their carrier.

The lock feature on mobile devices essentially allows carriers a way to prevent customers from switching to a new plan with a different company. Unless your phone came unlocked and are grandfathered in under the law, you're device is legally chained to your service provider.

»www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article···J8ScdCQq

wow wth?