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BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

And cable...

is still using MPEG-2. Maybe they will jump on the HEVC bandwagon, and start to bring the quality up. If it's really 4x as efficient as MPEG-2, they could run 8 HD's per QAM without losing quality over the original.


anon anon

@charter.com
OTA still uses mpeg-2. The FCC would love for broadcasters to switch to h.265 so then you can fit all the stations in market on 2 channels maybe 3 in a really large market. Then they can take away more OTA spectrum.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
OTA (ATSC, specifically) added support for h.264 in 2008. It's not clear to me that anybody is actually using it yet, however. TVs have supported h.264 for quite some time now (definitely any "smart TV" should), but even when they do, it's not guaranteed that their ATSC support has been updated to actually use their h.264 decoders.
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Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


anon anon

@charter.com
said by Guspaz:

OTA (ATSC, specifically) added support for h.264 in 2008. It's not clear to me that anybody is actually using it yet, however. TVs have supported h.264 for quite some time now (definitely any "smart TV" should), but even when they do, it's not guaranteed that their ATSC support has been updated to actually use their h.264 decoders.

They may support it but no one uses it. As I said H.265 could easily allow for 4 or 5 720p/1080i networks on one channel. Hmmmm ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, CW. All on one channel. Oooh the FCC's wet dream. There 4 more channels freed up. Actually 12 since usually the channel before and after is reserved as a guard band.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to Guspaz
said by Guspaz:

OTA (ATSC, specifically) added support for h.264 in 2008. It's not clear to me that anybody is actually using it yet, however. TVs have supported h.264 for quite some time now (definitely any "smart TV" should), but even when they do, it's not guaranteed that their ATSC support has been updated to actually use their h.264 decoders.

Broadcasters have the same issue cable/satellite providers do with their STBs/TVs in that their are OTA TVs/STBs that do not support H.264 so if they start transmitting with this codec not everyone will be able to receive the channel. Which sucks because all of these methods of distributing content whether it is cable/satellite or OTA could really gain from switching to H.264 on all channels.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
OTA has a real problem, because people own the equipment, and it can't do MPEG-4AVC or HEVC, so you'd break millions of TV, and those converter boxes.

Cable, however, owns the equipment, so they just need to be willing to pony up the money to do the switchover. Much of the equipment already support MPEG-4AVC, although if they're going to do a switchover, it's almost worth it to go HEVC at this point. TiVo and MCE support MPEG-4AVC, and MCE should be able to support HEVC, since you can install a codec for anything in Windows. That leaves TiVo, and I don't know if it can be software upgraded to new codecs, or through some sort of dongle or something.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by BiggA:

Cable, however, owns the equipment, so they just need to be willing to pony up the money to do the switchover. Much of the equipment already support MPEG-4AVC, although if they're going to do a switchover, it's almost worth it to go HEVC at this point. TiVo and MCE support MPEG-4AVC, and MCE should be able to support HEVC, since you can install a codec for anything in Windows. That leaves TiVo, and I don't know if it can be software upgraded to new codecs, or through some sort of dongle or something.

That's a blanket statement which is an assumption and frequently wrong. Cable providers do not own all of the equipment at the customer premises. No, it doesn't make sense to go HEVC at this point. The infrastructure won't exist for their use for a few years and they sure as hell won't want to have to go out and buy new encoders and swap millions of STBs / cable cards, etc. (yet). It'll happen eventually but not for quite some time.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
They could roll out hardware that runs MPEG-4AVC that's software upgradable to HEVC. Their current video quality is atrocious, and MPEG-4AVC or HEVC is one way that they could improve the quality.