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thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

Fibre Installers

Hi,

I'm looking for somebody or a company that can install an outdoor 200m run of fibre between two buildings. The piecework of cat5e and booster hubs/switches is proving to be to unreliable. So if anybody knows a good installer in the St-Jerome, Qc. area, please let me know.

Thanks



rocca
Start.ca
Premium
join:2008-11-16
London, ON
kudos:23

For others reading/considering this - just FYI, using cat5e between buildings often creates a ground differential during storms which will blow out the ports on the switches attached. Depending on your bandwidth requirements and line of sight, you may want to look at wireless as well, but fibre will definitely resolve the issue too.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to thestealth

Running the Cat5e through surge protectors (like a UPS) on either side might help with that, as would running better cable (like shielded cat6a).

Another option is VDSL2-based extenders, which you would use over a single 200m cat6 segment, and should be able to easily do 100 megabit over that length. Here is one such example, rated at up to 1000m (although you'd not get full speed at that distance):

»www.amazon.com/StarTech-com-VDSL···02CLKFTG

Also there is the possibility of coax-based extenders, such as this one that is rated for 112 Mbps at 900m and 64 Mbps at 2400m:

»ca.startech.com/Networking-IO/Me···~EOC110R

Fiber would definitely simplify things in that there would be no electrical continuity, no possibility of noise from the environment...
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
reply to rocca

This is exactly another reason why...blew 3 switches last summer and a UPS.

Shielded cat 6 paired with a vdsl adapter sounds good.

I do have a longer run using RG6 and a pair of these (»www.veracityglobal.com/products/···ire.aspx) that were previously installed by somebody else, but I am extremely disappointed with them. On top of that, the person who installed them did not put grounding blocks so one of the pair was also destroyed last summer. (There are now grounding blocks). Maybe I'll switch to the startech and give that a try. Has anybody used this product?

WIFI is out of the question, too many trees.

How much could a run of fibre this length cost? (disregarding actual network equipment)



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to thestealth

I should put a disclaimer that the two products I linked to are just things that turned up in Google that fit the type of product I had in mind, I'm not recommending those specific products. If you did decide to go a certain route, I'd encourage to you do some research in that direction on your own. Although having Amazon reviews is nice.

Remember that shielded ethernet cables are not very useful unless they're grounded (only on one side, to avoid a ground loop). I'm not actually sure what the procedure to do this is, though. I would imagine most standard ethernet jacks aren't grounded, some PoE devices are, and that you would normally run your ethernet through something like a ProtectNet and then wire that to the TVSS screw on a UPS or surge protector that has one.

EDIT: It looks like APC has gotten rid of the TVSS screws on all consumer UPS models. My Back-Ups RS 1500 (BR1500) has a TVSS screw between the input/output ethernet ports, but my Back-Ups Pro 1500 (BR1500G) which replaced that model in their product lineup does not.

It's possible that the ethernet ports in the BR1500G themselves support metal grounded RJ45 connectors, so the ProtectNet and TVSS screw wouldn't be necessary, but I'm really not sure.

--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to thestealth

said by thestealth:

How much could a run of fibre this length cost? (disregarding actual network equipment)

»store.cablesplususa.com/dx006dslx9kaa2.html

1000' direct burial 6-strand single mode $870
That and a Ditch-Witch rental for a 1/2 day gets you building to building

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

said by MaynardKrebs:

That and a Ditch-Witch rental for a 1/2 day gets you building to building

No need for a Ditch-Witch, we got a backhoe on site

Zed071

join:2010-09-16

said by thestealth:

said by MaynardKrebs:

That and a Ditch-Witch rental for a 1/2 day gets you building to building

No need for a Ditch-Witch, we got a backhoe on site

No matter which way you go, run it through some bright-orange painted conduit. Neither copper nor fibre can survive the John Deere Cable Locator, but the conduit may buy some breathing room.

Been there, done that.

Z

Toastertech
Premium
join:2003-01-05
Trenton, ON

1 edit
reply to thestealth

You may want to consider installing warning tape above the buried conduit (detectable or not your choice). If an operator is digging in the area and starts pulling up warning tape they will know to stop digging.

edit: cause english not so good late at night



alex3324

join:2000-08-03
West Des Moines, IA

Excellent point. Utility locator companies generally only locate commercial utilities, and not private utilities like data comms between buildings on a campus.


thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

Thanks for all the tips. I'm going to have to do some in depth research.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

said by thestealth:

Thanks for all the tips. I'm going to have to do some "in depth" research.

18" in the case of a/c power

Yes, use conduit for both mechanical protection of the cable and the ability to easily pull new cable should you ever need to.
And definitely use warning tape above the conduit, and install a tracer wire to the conduit.

If you have a property survey, attach a note with a sketch showing where the buried services are.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
reply to rocca

said by rocca:

For others reading/considering this - just FYI, using cat5e between buildings often creates a ground differential during storms which will blow out the ports on the switches attached.

Good NICs and switches have isolation transformers between the cable and electronics which can handle 2-5kV ground potential difference and eliminate the associated common-mode voltage spike so unless there is a lightning discharge through/near the grounding point or building wiring exceeding the transformers' rating, the likelihood of blowing up ports in a storm is low - DSL modems have ~1km of wiring to the DSLAM and millions of them have no trouble surviving thunderstorms.

Cheap equipment on the other hand may use capacitive coupling between chips and wiring, which would send a common-mode voltage spike directly to the chip. Thankfully, equipment cutting such dangerous corners is very uncommon.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
reply to thestealth

I think I will go with the coax option (RG6 with integrated messenger wire so I can install it on the poles that are already in place). It seems easy enough to find this wire, but I am having a hard time to finding messenger clamps online in small qty's. Does anybody know of a good place to get this type of product? (either online or from a local shop in MTL)


prairiesky

join:2008-12-08
canada
kudos:2
reply to thestealth

should still be 18" minimum. oddly enough fiber is still covered under the electrical code