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thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

Squirrels destroying my Cedar - Help

I've seen the squirrels taking branches off my Cedar tree to build a nest at the top of the Ash tree in the left of the picture. I saw that the Cedar was starting to look sparse, but did not realize how bad it was until the most recent thaw. With less snow I could see that most of the branches that were removed were never used for the nest but left on the ground. My question is does anybody have an effective method to help prevent the squirrels from destroying my Cedar further?




Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL

1 edit

1 recommendation

Get rid of the feeders and don't give them a reason to come to your yard.


HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink

1 recommendation

reply to thestealth

Click for full size
Bait a rat trap with peanut butter. Carefully place trap in a small box, laying on its side, with the business end facing the opening. This assures that the curious tree rat approaches from the proper direction and is dispatched quickly. Put it near the base of the tree.

Repeat as required.


Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL

Cause killing them is always the answer.


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:2
reply to thestealth

BB gun, end of issues


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus

1 recommendation

reply to Jon

said by Jon:

Cause killing them is always the answer.

It's effective and low cost, so yeah, it's at least AN answer. His tree is being destroyed, now, and so action is warranted.

Trap and release may be another answer, with the risks attendant of near contact with a live, very upset wild mammal. Rabies, fleas and other diseases may be present in these critters, plus it can take more time and be less effective in the short term.

What other "answers" can you think of that will work well, quickly and with little risk to the people that have to put up with them?


norton

join:2005-08-03
Howard City, MI
reply to thestealth

perhaps you could offer them substitute material, straw, leaves, etc. put in box at base of tree where squirrels nest is. At least cedar is not next to house - those trees burn very well even when green.



Jon
Premium
join:2001-01-20
Lisle, IL
reply to garys_2k

said by garys_2k:

said by Jon:

Cause killing them is always the answer.

What other "answers" can you think of that will work well, quickly and with little risk to the people that have to put up with them?

Quickly? I dunno. But as I said get rid of the feeders. I can see two in the pic. If there's nothing in you're yard they want, they wont go there. Though I'm not convinced the problem with the tree is Squirrels anyway. You're not gonna get multiple Squirrels nesting in one tree and one squirrel isn't gonna strip a tree for it's nest.

We have plenty here too and I see them picking up stick and leaves from the ground rather than pulling them off of trees. It's too much work.


davidg
Good Bye My Friend
Premium,MVM
join:2002-06-15
none
reply to thestealth

that tree is diseased, the squirrels may be using some of it but they did not do all that.

if you do kill the squirrels, skin/batter/fry them. they are wonderful, especially the red ones. greys have less meat, but still tastey.
--
Lack of Preparation on YOUR Part does NOT Constitute an Emergency on Mine!


harald

join:2010-10-22
Columbus, OH
kudos:2
reply to thestealth

Remove both trees. The cedar is diseased, and the ash will be unless you treat it for emerald ash borers. Even with treatment, which you will have to repeat regularly (it's not cheap) you may still lose it. In Columbus and vicinity all untreated ashes on public areas are being removed and replaced with other species, whether or not they are currently diseased.


boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC
reply to davidg

Some good info already given - as a rule, squirrels do in fact come to a place that has some attraction for them - food (esp bird feeders), water, whatever. If there IS something attracting them, then killing them will not do much long term good as other squirrels will take their place. No issue with killing squirrels as they are basically rats and do as much (or more) damage as rats. A good pellet gun will kill a squirrel easily but will the neighbors take kindly to you shooting 'those cute things'?

I agree, it appears that the amount of debris beneath the tree looks to be more than squirrel damage. Looks more like a hail storm hit the tree.



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

1 edit
reply to thestealth

Squirrels are nothing but rats that live in trees. Sure, they're "cute" and sometimes fun to watch, but they're destructive little buggers and nearly impossible to keep out of your yard. Think "herding cats". You cannot eradicate them. All you can do is discourage them a little. Bird feeders are a huge attraction for them.

If you know someone with an indoor cat, you might try asking for used litter box contents. Cat urine is pretty much a "no trespassing" sign for most squirrels.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!



pike
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to Jon

said by Jon:

Cause killing them is always the answer.

+1

How dare these audacious squirrels come in to OUR habitat and destroy OUR trees?

There are better ways to co-exist with the "nuisance" species around us than killing them. Besides you're not likely to make much of a difference in the 1.2+ billion North American squirrel population by taking them out one at a time with a rat trap.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC

The Cedar is not diseased, I have actually watched the rodents do this damage. Gnaw off a branch, start moving towards the nest, drop the branch. Repeat. Just with the snow, I did not realize how much the suckers dropped.

So far the only "good" solution would be to get rid of the bird feeders. I do not wish to kill them, maybe just force them to live elsewhere. Is there anything else I can do to discourage them?


Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
reply to boaterbob

said by boaterbob:

A good pellet gun will kill a squirrel easily but will the neighbors take kindly to you shooting 'those cute things'?

Then make some squirrel gravy and give it to them as a peace offering. But one squirrel doesn't make a big meal, the more the merrier.

harald

join:2010-10-22
Columbus, OH
kudos:2
reply to thestealth

I have a small-scale version of your problem with a sweet gum. I used to shoot them, but then a pair of red-shouldered hawks moved in across the street. Over three years they fledged 7 young, and they exterminated most of the squirrels and chipmunks. They are just now coming back after the departure of the hawks. We don't have trouble with ash trees - they are almost all gone, and the city has several crews working full-time to remove what's left.

Are there other trees suitable for squirrels besides the ash? Are you treating it? If both answers are no, then get rid of the ash.



norton

join:2005-08-03
Howard City, MI
reply to norton

i did some googling and here is more info on subject
»www.urbanwildliferescue.org/huma···rels.htm



linicx
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2002-12-03
United State
Reviews:
·TracFone Wireless
·CenturyLink
reply to thestealth

Squirrels do like to chew on wood. They regularly chew the bottom of wooden garage doors. I don't know why, but the new metal door stopped it.

The guy who removes trees for a living can tell in a heartbeat if the tree is damaged from squirrels, if has been attacked by an insect, if it has other issues, and if it can be saved. I managed to save an old elm that not diseased, an ancient male mulberry with an enormous canopy, and a fir that was in danger of falling onto a neighbors building. Over the years I paid for a lot of crowning and controlled growth. It was good advice as the trees are still standing and healthy with new growth every year. The crowned fir will grow taller but it does have new growth.
--
Mac: No windows, No Gates, Apple inside



toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Portland, OR
reply to thestealth

You are providing them food, that is why they are in your yard.

Take away the food source, easy really.


TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to thestealth

You can stop squirrels from climbing up the tree by wrapping a smooth plastic or metal sleeve around the trunk wide enough so they can't climb past it.

However, keep in mind they might still be able to jump to the tree from other nearby trees or tall objects (fence, etc).