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NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

3 edits
reply to MrMazda86

Re: Disable NAT on Vonage V-Portal

On the assumption that your "modem' is actually a DSL router, what you describe should work with no problems if you just setup your Vonage ATA to use DHCP and allow your "modem" to assign it a private IP address. Under those conditions, the Vonage ATA will get a NAT connection through the "modem", and the rest of your network will be free to use the static IP addresses that are earmarked for your use. I have done that with AT&T DSL service, and with Comcast cable service with no problems.

However, the number of IP addresses you describe is not typical for a routed IP address block, so perhaps TekSavvy is doing something non-standard (such as allowing multiple PPPoE sessions, each with a different IP address). A typical way for an ISP to assign a block of static IP addresses is to use a CIDR block. For example: 12.34.56.0/29 which would provide for a network address (12.34.56.0), 5 user addresses(12.34.56.1 - 12.34.56.5), an address for the "modem" (12.34.56.6), and a broadcast address (12.34.56.7). There would also be a totally separate WAN IP address for the "modem", that is often dynamic (instead of static), and can be supplied via DHCP or PPPoE. If that is actually what you have, then allowing the modem to assign your Vonage ATA a private IP address using DHCP should work, and the Vonage ATA should get a NAT connection that uses the "modem's" (probably dynamic) PPPoE WAN IP address (worst case...the Vonage ATA would get a NAT connection that shared the "modem's" static IP address depending on how the "modem" handled providing private DHCP IP addresses to its LAN).

If you want specific instructions that are reasonably guaranteed to work (instead of a generic guess), you will need to supply some specific information about what equipment is being used, how TekSavvy is actually assigning your static IP addresses, and how your modem/router is configured.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

MrMazda86

join:2013-01-29
Kitchener, ON
Therein lies the problem. The modem itself does allow for this, however if you read my original post, what you would see is that I want to bridge the modem to have it serve only as means of allowing the PPPoE passthrough because of the way the house is setup. There are 5 usable IP Addresses and 5 computers. The problem is that I have the Vonage adapter on ONE of these IP addresses, but would rather have it establish the PPPoE connection so that I can link all 5 of the computers together on the LAN. This is currently not possible with the NAT enabled on the Vonage V-Portal.

This is why I want to disable NAT on the Vonage V-Portal so that the V-Portal would still have it's direct connection to the internet using the IP Address for the PPPoE link, while leaving the 5 other IP Addresses accessible to the internet.

As I said, what I need to do is DISABLE THE NAT on the Vonage V-Portal in order to accomplish this. I have the SSH login to do this, but have not been able to stumble on the actual command to disable NAT. Without doing so, I would only be able to expose the IP address for the PPPoE link, effectively rendering the other IP addresses as useless.

As for assigning the IP Address through DHCP using the modem, this again will NOT work because it would leave me in the same boat that I'm in currently where I have one of the 5 usable IP addresses, reserved for the Vonage V-Portal, thereby not allowing me to directly connect all 5 computers. I think what you're doing is trying to guess at what I want to do, rather than actually fully reading my post. I thought I was very clear to specify that the ONLY way in which to accomplish the task of setting up the Vonage V-Portal to establish the PPPoE connection and allow the 5 IP addresses with the ability to be directly exposed to the internet is to disable the NAT.... THAT is what I'm trying to do.

The only difference between your suggestion and what I'm doing currently is that I would use DHCP to assign the same bloody IP address to the Vonage V-Portal that it already currently has assigned to it as a static IP. Besides, the flaw to DHCP is that when you have *STATIC* IP addresses to assign to your devices, using DHCP would only make those *DYNAMIC* across the network, which defeats the whole purpose of a STATIC IP address.


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
I don't know of anyway to have the Vonage box behave as a simple bridge device. If your ISP is assigning all five of your public static IP addresses via a different PPPoE session instead of using a CIDR block, then what you want to do is not possible (unless you can purchase another static IP address from your ISP). Perhaps that is not what you are describing, but that is what I interpret from your last post. It would help to know exactly what kind of "modem" you are using and how it is configured, but lacking that information, all I can do is try to interpret your somewhat conflicting description of your connection.

The closest you can come to achieving your goal (assuming that you really do have to have a separate PPPoE session for each device), would be to have the Vonage box be a PPPoE client, and put the PC behind it into the Vonage box's DMZ. That should allow bidirectional interaction to/from the Internet from the PC behind the Vonage box (it will still be NAT, but the effects should be minimized).
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

MrMazda86

join:2013-01-29
Kitchener, ON
The problem is the Simmens SpeedTouch 516 is the only device that establishes a PPPoE connection, as it will only allow for one connection. It then has the NAT disabled and is assigned the first IP address in the block. The modem's one and only LAN port is then plugged directly into a switch with 4 of the 5 computers attached to it. The Vonage V-Portal also has its WAN port connected to the switch, with the 5th computer plugged into the V-Portal's LAN port. The more "juicy" details of the configuration can be found in this forum thread.

If I had the command to use in the SSH terminal to disable the V-Portal's NAT, I could then switch the modem over to bridge mode and wire it directly to the V-Portal's WAN port. From there, the V-Portal would establish the PPPoE session, thus allowing me to use the 76.10.xxx.xxx IP address and assign the 173.xxx.xxx.225 address to the V-Portal's LAN connection, thereby allowing me to plug the V-Portal's LAN port and the computer that once plugged into it into the switch and assign the 173.xxx.xxx.230 IP address to the 5th computer. In this configuration, all devices would be able to be acknowledged as being directly connected, without the need for an additional IP address.

I'm hoping there is a way to do this and that it's just a matter of digging deep enough to do it, but it seems Vonage doesn't seem to have much support for anything to do with the SSH sessions with the V-Portal, which seems a little unusual.


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
OK, that clarifies things a bit. I seems that your ISP is indeed using a traditional CIDR IP address assignment instead of using individual PPPoE sessions (as you previously seemed to be saying).

Is the switch behind the SpeedTouch 516 only a 5 port switch? If that is the case, you may want to just get an 8 port switch, or cascade another 5 port switch. I have setup many CIDR block static IP circuits, and unless your SpeedTouch 516 is really brain dead, you should be able to do public static IP assignments for the PCs that you want to be publicly exposed, and just allow the SpeedTouch 516 to do a NAT DHCP assignment to the Vonage box. I have done this on multiple occasions, and it has always worked for me (but I have never tried it with a SpeedTouch 516, so certainly, YMMV).

One thing I am pretty sure of is that Vonage is not going to give your the root authentication for your Vonage box to allow you SSH access (and that is not unusual at all; they have never officially allowed customer SSH access to their ATA boxes). And even if they did, and you could disable NAT inside the Vonage box, I am pretty sure that the Vonage box would then require that its VoIP controller would need one IP address, and any connected devices would have to have a separate IP address. I have worked with ATAs that could be setup as bridge devices, and also with IP phones that were bridge devices, that that was always how they worked.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.