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vaxvms
ferroequine fan
Premium
join:2005-03-01
Wormtown
kudos:3
reply to systemq

Re: Ready to dump Windows, is Mac or Linux better for me?

You might be able to find a Mac at a public access location (library, school/college) you can use to see what it's like.
--
CMKRNL


itguy05

join:2005-06-17
Carlisle, PA

1 recommendation

reply to systemq

Mac.

I'm a Linux server admin by day and my desktop is Mac. Why? Just as reliable but way easier to use and get support for. Yes, Linux is getting better but Mac is there today and will be there going forward.

I have a Red Hat Desktop for work and it works well, but things are just harder and take more work to do. Since it has an Nvidia card whenever there is a kernel update I have to re-install the video drivers to get X to work. With my Mac it just works.

That being said, I've got Linux Mint on an old Netbook at home and it's quite good. However upgrades are more of a rip and replace rather than a true upgrade like OS X.

Don't get me wrong, I love Linux and it's rock stable and flexible for the server side. It's getting there but not ready yet for the Desktop.

Macs come with great photo management out of the box - iPhoto is good, Aperture is paid but great. You can do Photoshop or another great app called Pixelmator. GIMP is about all there is for Linux and, IMHO Sucks the big one.

Yes, Macs can be expensive as they really don't compete at the bottom of the barrel. But like everything else you get what you pay for. I'm typing this on a 2008 Macbook Pro that still works as the day I bought it and will most likely for another couple years.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to systemq

Just a thought OP, but I couldn't understand if you were dead set on a desktop or if you would be considering a laptop from your initial post. Do you have an preference? I know thinkpads are very robust. You could dual boot windows and linux on one, if you wanted to. Just a thought like I said.

Expand your moderator at work


J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
reply to systemq

Re: Ready to dump Windows, is Mac or Linux better for me?

Linux is by far cheapest route, but you need some learning. Especially when installing apps.

Mac is more pricey, but there are way more apps for it, and it's very easy to learn, no need to learn terminal commands like in Linux.

I've used all 3, I prefer Mac. Just way more software choice than Linux. Your hardware will outlast your software, but I think that's true with any OS.

Mac Mini if you're budget oriented.
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein



mromero
Premium
join:2000-12-07
The O.C.
kudos:1
reply to systemq

Mac Mini - Baseline, no upgrades except the CPU and GPU to your taste. DO NOT BUY THE RAM AND HARD DRIVE upgrades from Apple go the NewEgg route and DIY.

If you have a legit registered copy of Photoshop, you can do a crossgrade. Call up Adobe CS tell them you want to do a crossgrade since you will be switching from Windows to OS X. Youll pay a small fee and they will mail you the discs and give you a new serial for OS X.



Mike
Premium,Mod
join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to systemq

Linux will be ok but a lot can go horribly wrong quickly. It is still not "old personable" yet.

OS X however is. The downside is the upfront cost.

For photoshop you'd have to trade the license to OS X or emulate PS on linux.

Find a college student and buy a mac through them. There is a pretty good discount. Maybe throw the college kid a few bucks for their time and such.



Joey1973

@verizon.net
reply to systemq

It's less about the OS and more about the applications you need or want to use. If you have to use Office (because Excel really is the best spreadsheet, for example), then you'd either use Office for an Apple OS or maybe install it with Wine on Linux (can you do that? ). I think GIMP does a great job compared to Photoshop, but others don't agree. However, most of the alternatives to what you use now you can try out on your current system. The OS differences you should be able to learn in short order. Having said that, I'd go with a Linux distro--any one of them, all of which you can try out for free (unlike crApple*).

(*As you can see, I'm no fan of Apple. They're even more "controlling" than M$.)



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to systemq

Most of the reviews here are pretty accurate.

If you're willing to pay through the nose for a minimal maintenance computer, go with the Mac. You'll buy your hardware and your software, but you won't have to screw with it.

If you want to set this up yourself, save yourself a ton of cash, and still have a pretty solid out-of-box experience, go with Linux Mint.

Just because you'll need some help, doesn't mean you'll be left alone. I would strongly recommend Linux Mint for yourself if you go the Linux route. I would also strongly suggest staying away from the big box retailers and price the stuff out yourself (but not by yourself).

We have a Hardware forum that is fantastic at finding out exactly what you need and hitting a price point that works for you. Even though you don't game, there are still a lot of cheapo free games for Linux and there are some more serious ones that work under an emulator with some work.

There are tons of support forums on the Internet that help people like you out. Linux Mint was built literally for the uninitiated. Software like Libre Office and photo editing software exist on the initial install.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
reply to J E F F

I bought a Windows 8 laptop two months ago. i7 processor, 8 GB RAM, 1 TB HD... Cost was $830. The equivalent Macbook would have been $2000.

So for the cost of a Macbook, I could have had TWO Win8 laptops, with enough money left over for a few gourmet meals!

Sorry, but I don't see the justification in charging a 140% premium.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO

You get a shiny aluminum body and a light up apple logo! AND you get to support the company that lead the charge in making unlocking phones illegal. How is that *not* worth $1170 more? /sarcasm.



Mike
Premium,Mod
join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1
reply to Bob4

uh, no?

13" public pricing is $1,600. No one pays retail at Apple.

$1,450 edu or business.


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

15" was $2000 Black Friday sale. Normal price was $2100.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to Mike

Still about 75% more. Not to mention only a 13 inch screen vs a 15 inch screen.



intok

join:2012-03-15
reply to systemq

Go with Linux, you can run it on yor existing computer. I personally prefer Linux Mint with the Mate desktop.


praetoralpha

join:2005-08-06
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Mike

said by Mike:

Linux will be ok but a lot can go horribly wrong quickly. It is still not "old personable" yet.

I disagree. In over two years since I installed Linux on my parent's desktop, fewer things have gone wrong than ever did with Windows.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19

said by praetoralpha:

said by Mike:

Linux will be ok but a lot can go horribly wrong quickly. It is still not "old personable" yet.

I disagree. In over two years since I installed Linux on my parent's desktop, fewer things have gone wrong than ever did with Windows.

I thought the same thing for quite a while. After running Red Hat, SuSE, Oracle Linux, and a handful of other flavors at work, I thought it was just too complex at work.

I installed Linux Mint at home and it's a completely different OS. Under the hood, everything is the same. But they've made such drastic improvements to the UI that it seemed cleaner and easier to use than Windows was. For the basic user, there is no actual need to fire up a terminal to do anything.

The only reason keeping me from running Linux on my PC at home is gaming. I was able to get WoW to work flawlessly via WINE. I could have probably gotten SC2 to work as well, but I just don't think I could have gotten many of the other games to work.

Valve and a handful of other companies are changing direction in a course that favors Linux. It wouldn't take long for a generation of games to be working on both platforms. If M$ screws people over any further, I could see Linux become a gaming platform.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
join:2008-04-28
Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

said by Archivis:

Valve and a handful of other companies are changing direction in a course that favors Linux. It wouldn't take long for a generation of games to be working on both platforms. If M$ screws people over any further, I could see Linux become a gaming platform.

Considering PC gamers tend to be fairly technically savvy, if Valve et al. can make Linux a viable gaming platform then a lot of gamers would make the switch.

I'm already running Linux for almost everything but gaming, and I'm sure a lot of other gamers are doing the same.
--
Support Bacteria -- It's the Only Culture Some People Have


joetaxpayer
I'M Here Till Thursday

join:2001-09-07
Sudbury, MA

1 recommendation

reply to systemq

said by systemq :

Hi.

I've been using Windows since version 3.1. My current OS is Windows 7. I have zero knowledge about Mac's and zero knowledge about Linux. I know about them, just never used them.

If your current PC functions, download the latest Ubuntu Linux and try it. I had a work PC laptop that was slow as anything, and when it was replaced, I took the old one, wiped it, and put Linux on it. Funny, I have a house full of Macs. iPad, iPhone, too. But the laptop is Ubuntu, and the truth is, for the browsing, and few other things, it's great. It boots in 15 seconds, and updates itself to keep the OS fresh.


PhoenixDown
FIOS is Awesome
Premium
join:2003-06-08
Fresh Meadows, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to systemq

Mac ....

1 -- I am busy enough while I loved to tinker around with the PC back in the day (and still do to a degree) I just need it to work consistently without trying to figure out why something wont compile or some driver wont play nice with some other component of the system.

2 -- Apple is leading the way toward an integrated environment.

I'll start off by saying I am a windows user and I am NOT an apple fan boy by any means but my iphone is rock solid. My ipad is rock solid. Apple TV does everything I want and more. Adding a MAC just seems like a natural extension of that. Plus I like the way things are started to pull together ... facetime between MAC and Apple Devices for instance. Shared calendar and notes. And other little things that make the experience better.
--
Add a signature here



Boricua
Premium
join:2002-01-26
Sacramuerto
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

I thought the same thing for quite a while. After running Red Hat, SuSE, Oracle Linux, and a handful of other flavors at work, I thought it was just too complex at work.

I installed Linux Mint at home and it's a completely different OS. Under the hood, everything is the same. But they've made such drastic improvements to the UI that it seemed cleaner and easier to use than Windows was. For the basic user, there is no actual need to fire up a terminal to do anything.

The only reason keeping me from running Linux on my PC at home is gaming. I was able to get WoW to work flawlessly via WINE. I could have probably gotten SC2 to work as well, but I just don't think I could have gotten many of the other games to work.

Valve and a handful of other companies are changing direction in a course that favors Linux. It wouldn't take long for a generation of games to be working on both platforms. If M$ screws people over any further, I could see Linux become a gaming platform.

I just finished installing Linux Mint on a desktop at work that I am going to surplus. I agree with your assessment. I will probably install it on old desktops that have been collecting dust at home. Install this and give them away and have less clutter .
--
Illegal aliens have always been a problem in the United States. Ask any Indian. Robert Orben


systemq

@dslextreme.com

Is it possible to install Ubuntu and then Linux Mint without messing up my current system? In other words just to preview it? I only have one hard drive and don't want to mess around with partitioning.

Also what is the difference between 32 bit and 64? Why does Ubuntu recommend 32 on their page? I have a 64 bit system right now with Windows.

Also does Linux install secured out of the box or does it require add-ons? Do I need any virus scanner for Linux? I'm running Microsoft Security Essentials now.

Thanks again for all the feedback.



joetaxpayer
I'M Here Till Thursday

join:2001-09-07
Sudbury, MA

1 edit

It starts by burning a disc with the Ubuntu image. At start up you have an option to run from the disc to try it. At installation, you have an option to install as a second boot partition.

My suggestion was based on your saying you were getting a new PC, before trashing any old PC, I'd load Linux and see if it's worth keeping.

If your processor is 64 bit, that should work fine, they suggest 32 bit just to be safe.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to PhoenixDown

said by PhoenixDown:

Mac ....

1 -- I am busy enough while I loved to tinker around with the PC back in the day (and still do to a degree) I just need it to work consistently without trying to figure out why something wont compile or some driver wont play nice with some other component of the system.

Then dont compile stuff on linux, seriously just use the software center(different distros call it different names) pretty much everything is there. Then you don't need to compile software unless you choose to of course. I've not had any driver problems, but I know people who have had issues with some wifi and amd cards.


systemq

@dslextreme.com
reply to joetaxpayer

I found a Windows installer for Ubuntu and used that. It installed easily and now there is dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu when I restart. I'm typing this on Ubuntu now.

I'll give it a chance but so far I'm not really liking it. It's slower than Windows 7, I click something and takes forever to trigger. The screen doesn't look as sharp as Windows. Text looks funky, scroll bar tiny.

Several times Firefox froze and flickered while typing this. I'
ll play around with it some more in the next few days since I have the option to boot into it. Maybe I need to chance some settings.



dcurrey
Premium
join:2004-06-29
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Cincinnati Bell
·ViaTalk
reply to systemq

I have installed different Linux distributions in past from Red Hat, Fedora, Opensuse and kubuntu .

Kubuntu was my favorite for desktop applications and Opensuse for server. Granted they both can do the same but for Some reason Opensuse was always easier to figure out installing bind, imap, postfix, apache and such.

Don't really use linux much anymore. My server got way past its prime and never replaced it.

Did test the mint mentioned in this thread installed the MATE version and was surprised. Even off the boot dvd without installing all hardware and sound worked. Kubuntu never could get sound working on boot dvd. I am sure if I actually did full install I would be able to get it going but that doesn't bold well for anyone not familiar with linux to see dead hardware.



joetaxpayer
I'M Here Till Thursday

join:2001-09-07
Sudbury, MA
reply to systemq

There are many things that can affect performance, at least you tried it.

I wanted it to run the browsers more than anything, and found it runs both Firefox and Chrome with no issue. No pausing, and in the year or so I've used it, not blue-screened even once. With this stuff, it's always YMMV, I suppose.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to systemq

Try linux mint. I put it on my dads old laptop and its noticeably faster than w7.



systemq

@dslextreme.com
reply to joetaxpayer

After shutting down my computer. Then restarting it, guess what. Everything looks sharp and everything opens fast! I guess Ubuntu was doing something in the background to optimize it. Maybe that's the mystery why Linux isn't as mainstream if people abandon it after the first boot.

I still don't like Firefox, text looks strange and tiny along with the scroll bar, but I suppose it's something I can get used to after staring at a Windows program for years. But the operating system is totally fine. Really can't complain about it. If the word/excel/photoshop alternatives mentioned in this thread suits my needs, I think this is a fine alternative to Windows without spending so much money on a Mac. Actually the top area kind of looks like a Mac from the display models I remember seeing at Best Buy.

Am I safe using Ubuntu as is? I have firewall enabled on my router and have Security Essentials in Windows. Is there a MSE alternative? Also anything I should be aware of security wise? I don't want this experience to be ruined by getting hacked and identity stolen.

Thanks again for all the help.