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jaberi

join:2010-08-13

Super Bowl contest winner denied entry to U.S.

A Vancouver Island man who won an all-expenses-paid trip to the Super Bowl in New Orleans has been refused entry into the U.S. because of a marijuana possession conviction dating back to 1981.

Victoria resident Myles Wilkinson won the trip in a fantasy football league contest, competing against nearly four million other players for the chance to attend the National Football League championship, featuring the Baltimore Ravens and the San Francisco 49ers.

»ca.news.yahoo.com/super-bowl-con···994.html


elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
Anal Americans....

Oh he smoked dope and got caught, he might try to influence our citizens. ENTRY DENIED

jaberi

join:2010-08-13
reply to jaberi
he was convicted in vancouver was he not?


milnoc

join:2001-03-05
H3B
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to jaberi
Nothing new here. Any criminal conviction, no matter how minor and/or how long ago, is grounds for denied entry into the United States. This has been standard policy for decades.

Why is anyone so surprised?
--
Watch my future television channel's public test broadcast!
»thecanadianpublic.com/live

resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
reply to jaberi
He should've gotten a pardon years ago...
Then never spoken of his conviction again.

The US doesn't recognize our pardon system.. :\
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP


The Law

@videotron.ca
reply to jaberi
Law is the law. He's a criminal with a criminal conviction.

Maybe kids will read this story and learn that crime doesn't pay.

That is all.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to milnoc
said by milnoc:

Nothing new here. Any criminal conviction, no matter how minor and/or how long ago, is grounds for denied entry into the United States. This has been standard policy for decades.

Why is anyone so surprised?

Canada is similar. The law matters.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

reply to milnoc
said by milnoc:

Why is anyone so surprised?

I was wondering the same... title of the thread left out "criminal record". That's pretty much a done deal for caring.


Mike2009

join:2009-01-13
Ottawa, ON
kudos:3
reply to jaberi
Who cares?


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to resa1983
said by resa1983:

He should've gotten a pardon years ago...
Then never spoken of his conviction again.
The US doesn't recognize our pardon system.. :\

Exactly. Once you have a pardon the Americans will never find out you had a criminal conviction even if they run a check (and in turn, you can answer "no" if they ask you), but once the Americans find out and download the conviction to their own immigration database you're SOL even if you get a pardon later on. In other words, one should not travel to the US until the get a pardon.

This has become a big issue for older people who had convictions when they were young, crossed the border throughout their entire lives and then suddenly get called on it later in life. This isn't the first time I've seen this happen, and no doubt it won't be the last.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

Canada is similar. The law matters.

It is far far easier to be admitted to Canada with an old (as in, ten year plus) record than it is to the United States.


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

said by resa1983:

He should've gotten a pardon years ago...
Then never spoken of his conviction again.
The US doesn't recognize our pardon system.. :\

Exactly. Once you have a pardon the Americans will never find out you had a criminal conviction even if they run a check (and in turn, you can answer "no" if they ask you), but once the Americans find out and download the conviction to their own immigration database you're SOL even if you get a pardon later on. In other words, one should not travel to the US until the get a pardon.

This has become a big issue for older people who had convictions when they were young, crossed the border throughout their entire lives and then suddenly get called on it later in life. This isn't the first time I've seen this happen, and no doubt it won't be the last.

Fact...It was quite ironic, living in a border town and nitzguy's dad would cross the border on a way too frequent basis....at least once every couple of weeks, hey to buy cheap milk and gas it was worth it but without getting into another thread about US vs Canada prices....

On a recent trip when the question was asked if they had a convincition in the US, nitz's dad replied no....was hauled in for secondary inspection and found that there was a drug related charge back in 1973....that's right, 1973...and he must have crossed the border at least 1000 times in that span if not more and was never questioned...

I hope for one never to be turned around at the border, but he was, and Canada Customs was waiting for him...thankfully with relatively open arms, but he cannot go to the US again...at least that's what the border inspector said....

So, having a criminal record in the US is a bad idea kids...regardless of situation. He should have realized that when he entered the contest...

I guess nitz's dad forgot to get his pardon, but he has said its not worth it now...which I guess is fine...

Its too bad though, some older memories that I wanted to have with my father will never happen now. Going golfing in South Carolina he used to do that every February with his brothers and his father...now I won't be able to share in that.

Oh well, that's the rules, that's the rules.

resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
said by nitzguy:

Fact...It was quite ironic, living in a border town and nitzguy's dad would cross the border on a way too frequent basis....at least once every couple of weeks, hey to buy cheap milk and gas it was worth it but without getting into another thread about US vs Canada prices....

On a recent trip when the question was asked if they had a convincition in the US, nitz's dad replied no....was hauled in for secondary inspection and found that there was a drug related charge back in 1973....that's right, 1973...and he must have crossed the border at least 1000 times in that span if not more and was never questioned...

I hope for one never to be turned around at the border, but he was, and Canada Customs was waiting for him...thankfully with relatively open arms, but he cannot go to the US again...at least that's what the border inspector said....

So, having a criminal record in the US is a bad idea kids...regardless of situation. He should have realized that when he entered the contest...

I guess nitz's dad forgot to get his pardon, but he has said its not worth it now...which I guess is fine...

Its too bad though, some older memories that I wanted to have with my father will never happen now. Going golfing in South Carolina he used to do that every February with his brothers and his father...now I won't be able to share in that.

Oh well, that's the rules, that's the rules.

There still is a way for him to get in..
It just requires a US Entry Waiver.

Its something like $500, takes 4-12 months to get, and requires a DHS background check.
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
said by resa1983:

There still is a way for him to get in..
It just requires a US Entry Waiver.

Its something like $500, takes 4-12 months to get, and requires a DHS background check.

Thanks for the info, I'll pass it along, see what he says.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to resa1983
It is my understanding that you need a separate one for each and every entry you make.

If it were a blanket exemption this would pretty much be a non-issue.

peterboro
Avatars are for posers
Premium
join:2006-11-03
Peterborough, ON
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

Exactly. Once you have a pardon the Americans will never find out you had a criminal conviction even if they run a check (and in turn, you can answer "no" if they ask you), but once the Americans find out and download the conviction to their own immigration database you're SOL even if you get a pardon later on. In other words, one should not travel to the US until the get a pardon.

This has become a big issue for older people who had convictions when they were young, crossed the border throughout their entire lives and then suddenly get called on it later in life. This isn't the first time I've seen this happen, and no doubt it won't be the last.

And with the advent of the internet you have to change your name as well.

resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

It is my understanding that you need a separate one for each and every entry you make.

If it were a blanket exemption this would pretty much be a non-issue.

I dunno.. We saw the price and decided he'd avoid the US in any vacations we took in the future.

Also: Keep in mind, that YOU don't need to be the one crossing the border to have your record pop up. A family member can cross and have your record pop up. Hubby's brother crossed prior to the pardon completion, and that's how the US knows about his pardoned offense. Total invasion of privacy, but hey its the US gov. Its to be expected.
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP


nitzguy
Premium
join:2002-07-11
Sudbury, ON
said by resa1983:

said by Gone:

It is my understanding that you need a separate one for each and every entry you make.

If it were a blanket exemption this would pretty much be a non-issue.

I dunno.. We saw the price and decided he'd avoid the US in any vacations we took in the future.

Also: Keep in mind, that YOU don't need to be the one crossing the border to have your record pop up. A family member can cross and have your record pop up. Hubby's brother crossed prior to the pardon completion, and that's how the US knows about his pardoned offense. Total invasion of privacy, but hey its the US gov. Its to be expected.

Well, it hasn't been mentioned and I've gone across the border a few times (1 by air as previously mentioned, and about 4 by ground in the past 12 months)...this happenned to nitz's dad back in 2008, so its been a few years....and I'm sure the record hasn't gone away...

Maybe because I live in a different city, or something to that effect they don't call me on it?

Had they asked me though, I would have said no at the time as I didn't know until just recently that this happenned, they had just never told me...I guess to keep me naieve about my father? I don't know...


bluebaron2
Stuff Happens
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-01
North of 44
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

It is my understanding that you need a separate one for each and every entry you make.

If it were a blanket exemption this would pretty much be a non-issue.

" A US entry waiver can be granted for a period of one (1), two (2) or five (5) years by the US Government and can be renewed. "

»www.commissionaires-ottawa.on.ca···r-V2.pdf
--
bb2

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want. ~Bill Watterson

peterboro
Avatars are for posers
Premium
join:2006-11-03
Peterborough, ON
Looks like someone in here had to get one.

jaberi

join:2010-08-13
reply to bluebaron2
they kept a record for 32 years?

didn't colorado and some states decriminalize marijuana, so what happens in this case?...and what about the 2 grams, would they even arrest someone today for that?


Xstar_Lumini

join:2008-12-14
Canada
kudos:2
reply to jaberi
I see all these flyers at TTC bus stops about U.S. waivers/pardons for $500, but that's bullcrap the price you pay is around $1,800 to $3,000, you need a lawyer. My coworker was charged with drunk driving in 2007 and has a criminal record, he cannot enter the USA or get a canadian passport at that. That's what he's going to pay to get the pardon, around $3,000 for his lawyer.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to jaberi
said by jaberi:

didn't colorado and some states decriminalize marijuana

... it's a legal mess is what it is. When it comes to immigration though, federal law applies.


TLS2000
Crazy Canuck
Premium
join:2004-02-24
Mississauga, ON
reply to Xstar_Lumini
If he doesn't have charges pending and isn't on parole, he can certainly get a passport. That doesn't mean that anyone will let him into their country though.
--
Tom

resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
reply to Xstar_Lumini
said by Xstar_Lumini:

I see all these flyers at TTC bus stops about U.S. waivers/pardons for $500, but that's bullcrap the price you pay is around $1,800 to $3,000, you need a lawyer. My coworker was charged with drunk driving in 2007 and has a criminal record, he cannot enter the USA or get a canadian passport at that. That's what he's going to pay to get the pardon, around $3,000 for his lawyer.

Pardons can be done without a lawyer, for MUCH cheaper than 3k, and as long as you follow the instructions properly it'll be done in the same time period as if you went with a lawyer.

As for entering the US - its up to the border guard, but if all it was was a DUI, they can let you in as the US gov doesn't consider that 'serious' (go figure).

quote:
At this time, driving under the influence, breaking and entering, disorderly conduct and simple assault are not considered crimes that make a person inadmissible to the U.S., although if there are multiple convictions and or other misdemeanors, you could be denied entry.
»help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/···,-waiver
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
Go figure, as impaired driving is one of the things that the CBSA won't screw around with and will typically disqualify you on the spot.


hmm

@videotron.ca
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

This has become a big issue for older people who had convictions when they were young, crossed the border throughout their entire lives and then suddenly get called on it later in life. This isn't the first time I've seen this happen, and no doubt it won't be the last.

It's not only criminal convictions (or felonies).

People who have attempted suicide have also been refused entry into the states. Been many a story where Mom tried to get on a plane with her family and she is refused while dad and the kids continue.

Did your suicide attempt require an ambulance and that got a cop involved to make a report? Then you are prone to be stopped and refused entry at any time to the states (or flying through their air space for that matter).

I do believe suicide is still a crime in American books even if it's not in Canada.

I recall reading that there is some fed place you have to write to, and maaaaybe pay as well to have this removed so it doesn't end up in American hands should you and the family decide to go to the states, but I no longer recall the routine, or where I read this. But a google search should bring it up. Think it might be on PrivComs's site as well.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
Suicide has nothing to do with any of that. Rather, it is an ongoing history of involuntary admission to a mental health facility that can be an issue.

Either way, those are far easier to deal with than being denied entry because of a criminal record.


hm

@videotron.ca
reply to resa1983
said by resa1983:

There still is a way for him to get in..
It just requires a US Entry Waiver.

Its something like $500, takes 4-12 months to get, and requires a DHS background check.

Hmm
I've had friends with felonies in the states come to Canada and Canadian friends with convictions go to my summer place in the states. Both DUI's.

In the Canadian case I called the American border to find out the info and was told no problem and given a reference number should there be some issue crossing in the states. Had to give them the story of his DUI.

In the American case. Nothing. I was told the guy has to fill out a form and give something like 500$ to some place in Boston to get some sort of waiver to cross into Canada. Canadian border told us to just take a chance and cross in with him. If anything they will just refuse him entry and we can drive him back home heh. And that's what we did. No issue. Don't ask, don't tell.


hmm

@videotron.ca
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

Suicide has nothing to do with any of that. Rather, it is an ongoing history of involuntary admission to a mental health facility that can be an issue.

Either way, those are far easier to deal with than being denied entry because of a criminal record.

Nothing to do with history. All to do that you tried to commit suicide.

However, I seem to recall in this one instance with that women who was stopped on her way to disney land with her family had to then produce medical records (or something like that), which again is an invasion of privacy. But it had something to do with suicide being illegal in the states.

Same amount of paperwork, no clue about fee's though. Either way it's a border stopper. If someone did this, best to do the paperwork to get it removed or you will then be required to submit medical records etc.