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jamesonnorth

join:2012-12-22
Modoc, IN

1 recommendation

reply to flxuser

Re: Getting frontier to upgrade regional network

Assuming they're being truthful and have knowledge about it, the techs might know what kind of backhaul Frontier has feeding your area. Anyone higher than a tech usually isn't willing to give out specific information. The most you could probably hope to pry out of them is whether it's a fiber or copper backhaul, but that doesn't do much for you.

Knowing if your CO is fed with fiber or copper will tell you if it has more or less than 45mbps per connection. To my knowledge (Net+ and a full time Geek) long distance copper backhaul maxes out at 45mbps T3 lines, and Fiber backhaul almost never feeds at speeds less than 45mbps T3, usually starting at least 150mbps up to several gigabits.

Knowing what kind of backhaul the CO has is only useful if you know how many people are using the internet during peak times. If there are 100 people using the internet when it slows down, and it slows to around 1mbps per person, odds are you have two T3 lines feeding your CO or remote connection point and you should definitely complain POLITELY until your CO is upgraded.

This is all pure speculation though, as even with gigabits of backhaul from your CO to the regional connection point, if there's congestion from that regional connection point out to the internet, you will still experience slow speeds.

If you want to know if the congestion is at your CO or in your region, open a command prompt in windows and ping your internet gateway address (it's the first hop outside your modem) with a "-t" after the address. The "-t" sends pings continuously until you stop it or close the window. It'll look something like this: "ping 74.42.148.105 -t" If your ping times vary a lot or you don't get responses, the congestion is probably between your CO and the regional connection point and one of the ends or the connection in the middle might need to be upgraded. If you DON'T experience changes in ping times or dropped packets, the problem is likely beyond the regional connection point on Frontier's backbone network or on the internet itself. You can also do this in Mac using Network Utility's Ping tab and check the "Send an unlimited number of pings" box.

If you don't experience significant changes in ping times, ping times over 150ms, or many dropped packets over a period of 1-6 hours, the problem is likely beyond the scope of what Frontier is willing to do for you, and you'll simply have to wait for them to upgrade their backbone network in your area, which could be a 6 month wait or more, as they have to lay new fiber or lease bandwidth from other companies like Verizon, AT&T, Level 3, etc.

Please forgive this long post, but I feel it could benefit you
--
CompTIA Net+ Network Administrator - I know networks!
Professional Photographer - www.jnphoto.biz - Weddings and Senior Photos
Nice and comfy with Frontier DSL: I can help with your issues!
»speedtest.net/result/2472459013.png


flxuser

join:2013-02-05
Naples, NY

Thank you, this is extremely helpful!


slopoke

join:2012-05-20
London, OH
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to jamesonnorth

That's good. Explains a lot. Our tech is a cool, and serious guy and explains all the upgrades. We have rural CO right in town (pop. 800) and still experience peak drops in speed. But they are working, like you said on feeds etc. WE good here (Central Ohio) for DSL, never drops hardly ever. (2 yrs. twice) I appreciate your explanation. Lot's better than Verizon.
--
Just Me and My Acer. And a bag of chips.


flxuser

join:2013-02-05
Naples, NY
reply to jamesonnorth

Can anyone recommend a free, easy-to-use piece of software that would GRAPH packet loss or just overall network speed, to visually document the almost-daily outages that happen for a number of local users? Most of them will be even less techy than I am so I am looking for something easy to use that they can understand and share with CSRs.


gozer
Premium
join:2010-08-09
Rochester, NY

Simple tracert that shows loss
»winmtr.net

This can do speed monitoring
»testmy.net/


jamesonnorth

join:2012-12-22
Modoc, IN
reply to flxuser

I agree with gozer. Keep it simple. But if you're willing to do a little work...

I use a pfSense server, which keeps records of packet loss, ping times, and network throughput for 8 hours up to 4 years. If you set up a pfSense box as a simple router and get links to the RRD graphs, you'll be all set. It's a pretty easy way to keep track, but does require a little work to get it up and running.
--
CompTIA Net+ Network Administrator - I know networks!
Professional Photographer - www.jnphoto.biz - Weddings and Senior Photos
Nice and comfy with Frontier DSL: I can help with your issues!
»speedtest.net/result/2472459013.png