dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
731
share rss forum feed


FF4m3

@rr.com

MS May Be Seeking Protection From Linux With Dell Loan

From InfoWorld:

Microsoft's $2 billion loan to Dell is a sign that the software maker wants to influence hardware designs in a post-PC world while protecting itself from the growing influence of Linux-based operating systems in mobile devices and servers, according to analysts.

It may also be an attempt to secure the partnership and to stop the PC maker from looking toward alternative operating systems like Linux, analysts said. Dell offers Linux servers and in late November introduced a thin and light XPS 13 laptop with a Linux-based Ubuntu OS, also code-named Project Sputnik. Major PC makers in recent months have also introduced laptops with Chrome OS.

The investment could help Microsoft ensure that Dell doesn't drift toward Linux-based operating systems such as Chromebook or Android, said Al Hilwa, program director at IDC. "For them it's a little investment, but it allows them to put strategic influence" behind the device designs and software implementations, Hilwa said.

Microsoft's Windows 8, which shipped in October, so far has failed to lift PC shipments, which fell by 6.4 percent in fourth quarter of 2012 compared to the same quarter in 2011, according to research by IDC.

Dell's PC offerings are mainly based on Windows, but the company has been adding Linux to its server offerings. The company has also been increasing its profile in the open-source community with contributions to the OpenStack cloud OS and efforts like Crowbar, which is a software framework for systems management on Linux servers.

While Microsoft's loan isn't a major part of the deal, it is large enough to ensure Dell's commitment to Microsoft's products and keep its struggling PC business alive, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

There could also be more touch-based laptops, tablets and even smartphones based on Microsoft's Windows operating systems in the future, King said.

However, a Microsoft-imposed limit on Linux-based product development would not necessarily be in Dell's best interests, King said. Despite Microsoft's loan, Dell will likely remain committed to Linux as it remains important to the company's enterprise offerings.

"I hope for both Dell's and Microsoft's case that the investment was made without strings attached," King said.


garywk

join:2001-03-06
Clarkston, WA
said by FF4m3 :

From InfoWorld:

Microsoft's $2 billion loan to Dell is a sign that the software maker wants to influence hardware designs in a post-PC world while protecting itself from the growing influence of Linux-based operating systems in mobile devices and servers, according to analysts.

It may also be an attempt to secure the partnership and to stop the PC maker from looking toward alternative operating systems like Linux, analysts said. Dell offers Linux servers and in late November introduced a thin and light XPS 13 laptop with a Linux-based Ubuntu OS, also code-named Project Sputnik. Major PC makers in recent months have also introduced laptops with Chrome OS.

The investment could help Microsoft ensure that Dell doesn't drift toward Linux-based operating systems such as Chromebook or Android, said Al Hilwa, program director at IDC. "For them it's a little investment, but it allows them to put strategic influence" behind the device designs and software implementations, Hilwa said.

Microsoft's Windows 8, which shipped in October, so far has failed to lift PC shipments, which fell by 6.4 percent in fourth quarter of 2012 compared to the same quarter in 2011, according to research by IDC.

Dell's PC offerings are mainly based on Windows, but the company has been adding Linux to its server offerings. The company has also been increasing its profile in the open-source community with contributions to the OpenStack cloud OS and efforts like Crowbar, which is a software framework for systems management on Linux servers.

While Microsoft's loan isn't a major part of the deal, it is large enough to ensure Dell's commitment to Microsoft's products and keep its struggling PC business alive, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

There could also be more touch-based laptops, tablets and even smartphones based on Microsoft's Windows operating systems in the future, King said.

However, a Microsoft-imposed limit on Linux-based product development would not necessarily be in Dell's best interests, King said. Despite Microsoft's loan, Dell will likely remain committed to Linux as it remains important to the company's enterprise offerings.

"I hope for both Dell's and Microsoft's case that the investment was made without strings attached," King said.

Hoping for MS to have made an investment like this one without major strings attached is like sticking your bare hand in a large bonfire and hoping you won't get burned.
--
"Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent a mere number.... socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude."

de Tocqueville


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to FF4m3
quote:
While Microsoft's loan isn't a major part of the deal, it is large enough to ensure Dell's commitment to Microsoft's products and keep its struggling PC business alive, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.
He also noted that the sky was blue. Duh.

quote:
"I hope for both Dell's and Microsoft's case that the investment was made without strings attached," King said.
That seems really naive. Here's two billion dollars - you go do whatever you want. Yeah.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to FF4m3
This sounds like yellow journalism. Is there any indication at all that Microsoft's loan is a move against Linux? There are a million reasons why Microsoft may have loaned Dell the money. Any journalist could pick one out of a hat and write a story about it. This random reason is provocative and is likely to get people riled up, which is probably why he chose it.
If one wants a good Microsoft attacks Linux story there's a lot of real stuff out there. There's no reason to go making them up.
--
"Padre, nobody said war was fun now bowl!" - Sherman T Potter

»maxolasersquad.com/

»maxolasersquad.blogspot.com

»www.facebook.com/maxolasersquad


FF4m3

@rr.com
said by Maxo:

This sounds like yellow journalism.

More yellow journalism follows:

Microsoft looking to release Office for Linux in 2014:

This rumor stems from a source in Brussels, Belgium, who spoke to Phoronix’s Michael Larabel at FOSDEM, one of Europe’s larger open source conferences. According to this source, who is presumably one of Microsoft’s open source developers, Microsoft is taking a “meaningful look” at releasing a full Linux port of Office in 2014. The sudden change of heart is apparently due to Linux showing “commercial viability,” and because Microsoft is reportedly already working on Office for Android.

Until now, Microsoft has never released a piece of desktop software for Linux (with the exception of Skype, but that was an acquisition). Microsoft does have a Linux department, though, which has mainly been tasked with maintaining Hyper-V (virtualization) compatibility with Linux OSes under Windows. Presumably, with the development of Office for Android, Microsoft has beefed up its number of Linux developers, and those developers will then also work on Office for Linux.

The other possibility is that Microsoft might be reacting to increased uptake of Linux and cloud-based productivity suites by large institutions, such as universities and governments.



DarkSithPro

join:2005-02-12
Tempe, AZ
kudos:2
reply to FF4m3
Microsoft would be stupid NOT to have any influence after investing 2 billion bucks. It' pretty pathetic when the Linux community cries foul play when Microsoft makes an "investment" and somehow because it's Microsoft it's wrong that they can make profit, or gain market share. This makes no sense. It's like saying you can buy the majority of the stock, but cannot make any decisions, or you place a money bet on a team, the team wins but you don't get any money.


Bill_MI
Bill In Michigan
Premium,MVM
join:2001-01-03
Royal Oak, MI
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WOW Internet and..
reply to FF4m3
I thought it obvious, since Apple's huge success, that Microsoft wants to expand to the total product like Apple. They're adding hardware and Dell is part of that direction.

Does it threaten Linux? Of course. The same it threatens anything with pieces of whole products, software and hardware alike. It's no different than Apple trying to take over all of computing, locking down their devices, and going for the proprietary gold.

Just my 2 cents.


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to FF4m3
The more obvious explanation is that sales of Windows is tightly linked to the health of the PC market. The health of companies like Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc. is crucial for Microsoft. It absolutely does make sense for Microsoft to try to help keep these companies strong without meddling too deeply into their internal affairs. In fact, it could be argued that if investing in Linux is good for Dell then that strength for Dell can also be translated in strength for Microsoft.
We don't need to pull stories nefarious anti-Linux motives out of our arse to explain this move by MS.
--
"Padre, nobody said war was fun now bowl!" - Sherman T Potter

»maxolasersquad.com/

»maxolasersquad.blogspot.com

»www.facebook.com/maxolasersquad


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
said by Maxo:

The more obvious explanation is that sales of Windows is tightly linked to the health of the PC market.

Currently tightly linked. It's pretty obvious they're trying to unlink that, also just like Apple. ("We are a devices and services company")
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

1 recommendation

said by JohnInSJ:

said by Maxo:

The more obvious explanation is that sales of Windows is tightly linked to the health of the PC market.

Currently tightly linked. It's pretty obvious they're trying to unlink that, also just like Apple. ("We are a devices and services company")

Very true. However their current bread and butter is the desktop OS, and software and services that run on top of their desktop OS.
Their attempts to compete in the newer spaces, i.e. mobile, are only going mediocre. They still need the PC market to thrive while they try to reinvent themselves.
--
"Padre, nobody said war was fun now bowl!" - Sherman T Potter

»maxolasersquad.com/

»maxolasersquad.blogspot.com

»www.facebook.com/maxolasersquad


FF4m3

@rr.com
said by Maxo:

They still need the PC market to thrive while they try to reinvent themselves.

Yes, you can run Linux on your Microsoft Surface Pro - February 6, 2013:

Reddit user Nygmatic asked the question:

"For the Surface Pro….is the boot loader unlocked? Can I do what I want with my (potential) property? Or am I locked in to Windows 8?"
Panay [Microsoft VP Panos Panay] and the Surface team answered, simply and briefly, that it is indeed possible:
"Like other Windows 8 machines, you can access BIOS settings and turn off secure boot, enabling you to load other OSes."
The reply proved popular, quickly garnering 448 upvotes, and resulting in Nygmatic saying that Panay “may have just sold me one,” and replies from other redditors like this: “Why not advertise this heavily!!!! This is a great feature for tech enthusiasts out there.”

Linux on Surface RT is not possible, or at least not easy, because Microsoft has used the UEFI Secure Boot system to lock down the firmware and only allowed signed binaries (applications) to run. It can’t be turned off, and while it is a security measure to ensure malicious software cannot run and damage your machine or steal your data, it can also be an anticompetitive tactic to stymie operating system competition.

However, Microsoft has obviously decided that the “Pro” part of “Surface Pro” is actually meaningful, not just a marketing designation, and has provided the ability for enthusiasts to fiddle, potentially damage or even brick, but ultimately customize their devices exactly how they see fit.